Species Description – Result


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Mammillaria albicans

  • First description by Kakteen (Berger) 308 (1929)
    Basionym : (Briton & Rose , Neomammillaria albicans -The Cactaceae 4: 138 (fig. 152)1923)

  • Body: Plants branching basally to form clusters with spines nearly obscuring the stem. Stems columnar, pale green, to 20 cm (7.9 in) high and 6 cm (2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: fleshy root system but sparse branches
  • Sap: no latex
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules broadly conical, without latex.
  • Axil: wooly, dense wool in the flowering zone and a few bristels, white with dark brown tips.
  • Radial spine: 14 – 21, white, 5 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 8, straight or sometimes one hooked, white with brown tips, 8 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: broad with funnelform, white to pale pink, with pinkish midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, orange to red, 10 – 18 mm (0.4 – 0.7 in) long.
  • Seed: Nearly round, black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): July, August.
  • Minimum temperature: -1°C
  • Habitat Substrate: limestone
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California Peninsula and various islands, Mexico. Altitude 10 ? 200 m.
  • Comments: In culture, mineral substrate. Needs a high grit content. Not an especially easy species to grow. Should be carefully watered, especially in light of its small root system. Strong light is required for flowering.
  • Bibliography: -Mammillaria Postscript 6 -S.5 – 1997 -David R. Hunt
    -Mitteilungsblatt des Arbeitskreises fur Mammillarienfreunde-16(5)-184.1992-J. Luthy
  • Synonymes: M. albicans fa dolorensis
    M. albicans fa slevinii
    M. slevinii

Mammillaria albicoma

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt.-Ges. 1:241 (1929)

  • Body: Plants branching basally, often forming flat mounds with spines obscuring the stems. Stems flattened globose to short cylindrical, to 5 cm (2 in) high, 3 – 5 cm (1.2 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: fleshy branching
  • Sap: without latex
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules conical to cylindrical, bright green, truncate apically, without latex.
  • Axil: with felt and bristels.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 40, hairlike, fine, white, 8 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long, radiating and overlapping to completely hide the plant body.
  • Central spine: 3 – 4, sometimes absent, straight, white with reddish brown or yellowish brown tips, 4 – 5 mm long, thicker than the radials, just discernable among the dense radials
  • Flower: wide funnelform, pale greenish yellow to cream, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: red, small.
  • Seed: black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): from May until September
  • Minimum temperature: -2°C
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 1.400 to 1.700 mtr.
  • Comments: In culture, organic substrate. As with all species with long hair-like spines, having water remain for long periods of time in the spines can be a problem. Watering from the side is best. It is a slow grower, but with patience it will form small clumps.
  • Bibliography: John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – Page 31
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria albiflora

  • First description by (Wedermann) Backeberg 1937
    Mammillaria herrerae var. albiflora Wedermann 1931

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, sometimes forming clusters with the stems obscured by the spines. Stems somewhat cylindrical, slender, to 5 cm (2 in) or mire in hight, 1 – 2 cm (0.4 – 0.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: taproot
  • Sap: sans latex
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: small, without latex.
  • Axil: naked.
  • Radial spine: 60 – 80, short, white, interlacing, fine.
  • Central spine: none.
  • Flower: white with pale pinkish flush, to 35 mm (1.4 in) long and 25 mm (1 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: retained beneath the spines, but not within the plant body.
  • Seed: black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): April
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Mexico. Altitude 2.160 to 2.200 mtr.
  • Comments: In culture, mineral substrate. Considered one of the most difficult species to grow, it is best to avoid much organic material in the soil; limestone added to the soil may help, and a light hand with watering. Maximum light is needed to induce flowering.
  • Bibliography: <br>Hunt (1997) – Mammillaria postscript N?6 – page 3
    <br>John Pilbeam (1998) – Mammillaria Handbook 6 – page 32
  • Synonymes: <br>M. herrerae var albiflora

Mammillaria albilanata ssp albilanata

  • First description by Backeberg 1939

  • Body: Plants usually solitairy, sometimes several stemmed with age. Stems globose to short cylindrical, sunken apically, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high and 8 cm (3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: fibrous.
  • Sap: with latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules gray-green, firm.
  • Axil: coarsely woolly.
  • Radial spine: 15 – 26, stiff, straight to slightly curved, chalky white, 2 – 4 mm long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, stiff, straight, white to cream, with brownish tips, 2 – 3 mm long.
  • Flower: Carmine to purplish pink to pink, to 7 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Fruit: pink to red.
  • Seed: pale brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): April
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guerrero, Puebla, Chiapas, and Colina, Mexico. Altitude 500 to 2.200 mtr.
  • Comments: In culture, mineral/organic substrate. Slow growers that shouldn?t be rushed, otherwise their tight spination and compact forms will be lost. As with most white spined species, high light levels are needed to produce the best specimens. Some plants will cluster with age, others will remain single.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 33.
  • Synonymes:
    M. fuauxiana

    M. igualensis

    M. igualensis var palmillensis

Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana

  • First description by Reppenhagen, Gatt. Mamm. 126 (1987) – as M. ignota

  • Body: Plants depressed globose, 3 to 7 cm tall, 4 – 7 cm wide.
  • Roots: fibrous.
  • Sap: with latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil:
  • Radial spine: 20 to 22, 2 to 4 mm long, bristle-like, glassy white.
  • Central spine: 1 to 4, 4 to 7 mm long needle-like, glassy white, tipped brown.
  • Flower: Carmine-pink, stigmas greenish.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): from March to June.
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxacana and Puebla, Mexico. Altitude 700 to 2.400 m.
  • Comments: Expanding the description to take account of the synonyms calls for stems 10 or 12 cm at most tall, to 8 cm wide; radial spines 13 to 27; central spines 1 to 6.
    <br>In culture, mineral/organic substrate.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 290.
  • Synonymes: M. ignota – M. lanigera – M. lanigera var juxtlahuacensis – M. monticola – M. noureddineana

Mammillaria albilanata ssp reppenhagenii

  • First description by Hunt, Mamm. Postscripts 6: (1997); Kakt. and. Sukk. 28(6): 129 (1977) – as M. reppenhagenii

  • Body: Plants simple or rarely offsetting, globose to shortly columnar, to 9 cm (occasionally to 15 cm) tall, about 6 cm in diameter.
  • Roots: fibrous.
  • Sap: with latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: With persistent, short white wool.
  • Axil: With persistent, short white wool.
  • Radial spine: Mostly 22 or 23, varying from 19 to 26, white, 2 to 3 mm long, longer at the sides.
  • Central spine: 2 to 5, usually 4, 3 to 6.5 mm long, pinkish or reddish brown at first with darker tips, later paler towards the base.
  • Flower: Carmine with lighter edges, small, 10 to 12 mm long, 5 to 8 mm wide.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): April, May.
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Colima, Mexico. Altitude 900 to 1.300 m.
  • Comments: In culture, mineral/organic substrate.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 35.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. reppenhagenii

Mammillaria albilanata ssp tegelbergiana

  • First description by Gates ex Lindsay, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 38(6): 196 (1966) – as M. tegelbergiana

  • Body: Plants solitary stemmed, depressed-globose to subcylindric, to 7 cm tall, 6 cm wide.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: At first with white wool.
  • Radial spine: 18 to 24, white, 2 to 4 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4 (sometimes 6), white to straw coloured, 3 to 7 mm long, with dark brown tips.
  • Flower: Purplish pink, 13 mm long, 5 mm wide. Stigmas yellow.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): April
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C.
  • Habitat Substrate: Crevices of limestone rock.
  • Geographic Distribution: Chiapas, Mexico. Altitude 700 to 2.200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 36.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. tegelbergiana

Mammillaria amajacensis

  • First description by Brachet, Lacoste & Otero, Mamm. Soc. J. 31(1): 6(1991), nom prov.

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems globose to short cylindrical, 9 – 10 cm (3.5 – 3.9 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules conical, dark blue green.
  • Axil: Densely woolly, especially near the apex.
  • Radial spine: Absent.
  • Central spine: 2 (occasionally 4), straight, pinkish gray with blackish tips, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long, lower ones longest.
  • Flower: Pinkish cream with darker midveins.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Mexico. Altitude 1.800 m.
  • Comments: Slow growing.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 37.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 405.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria angelensis

  • First description by Craig, Mamm. Handb. 165, fig. 146 (1945)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, sometimes clustering. Stems globose to short cylindrical, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high and 6 cm (2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: fibrous.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical, blue green.
  • Axil: Densely woolly and with white bristles to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 20, straight, smooth, stiff, white, 5 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 4, straight, purplish brown with lighter base, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long, lower one hooked and longer.
  • Flower: There are distincly two colour forms recorded, the first, as originally described is white, with pinkish midstrips at the tips of the outer petals, often narrow and quite widely separated; the second form is much more deeply coloured, with deep pink petals and maroon midstripe, stigma-lobes on both forms are yellowish olive-green. Size to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and 30 mm (1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): from Arpil to July.
  • Minimum temperature: -2° C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Angel de la Guarda and Ventana Islands, and the region of Bahia de Los Angeles on the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico. Altitude near sea level to 300 m.
  • Comments: In culture, mineral substrate. Requires an open soil with excellent drainage. Clustering if the plant can be kept alive long enough. Like many Baja California species, difficult in cultivation, but a careful hand with watering will help.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 38.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 406.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. dioica ssp angelensis

Mammillaria anniana

  • First description by Glass & Foster, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 53(2): 79 (1981)

  • Body: Plants usually many-stemmed. Stems globose to flattened globose, apple green, to 3 cm (1.2 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots: fleshy branching.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tapering gradually, round in cross section.
  • Axil: With tufts of wool and twisted hairs.
  • Radial spine: 13 – 14, yellowish white, stiff, thin, straight, 6 – 11 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 5 – 9, needle-like, yellow to golden amber, stiff, 9 – 12 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) long, mostly straight, one hooked.
  • Flower: Not opening widely, pale witish yellow, 8 – 12 mm (0.3 – 0.5 in) long; pericarpels unusually long.
  • Fruit: Red, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): from May to September.
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 350 – 800 m.
  • Comments: In culture, organic substrate. Easy in cultivation.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 39.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 406.

  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria armillata

  • First description by K. Brandegee, Zoe 5: 7 (1900)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later clustering. Stems slender cylindrical, to 30 cm (12 in) high, 4 – 5 cm (1.6 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: fibrous.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules blue-green, conical to cylindrical, firm, without latex.
  • Axil: With wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 9 – 15 mm, interwoven, whitish, thin and bristle-like straight, 7 – 12 mm (0.3 – 0.5 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, stout, yellowish gray, becoming darker with age, 10 – 20 mm (0.4 – 0.8 in) long, one strongly hooked.
  • Flower: Funnelform, pinkish creamy yellow, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): from April to July.
  • Minimum temperature: +2° C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Wide spread in the cape area of Baja California, Mexico. Also reported from Isla Cerralvo. Altitude near sea level to 200 m.
  • Comments: In cultivation it presents the usual problems of this Series, needing extra gritty compost (mineral), care not to pot in a larger container than needed for the sparse roots, and never receiving more water than can be absorbed within a few days. Full light is needed for best spine development and for maximum flower production.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 40.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 406.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria aureilanata

  • First description by Backeberg, Beitr. Sukk. u.-pflege 13 (1938)

  • Body: Plants solitary, tuberous basally, depressed globose, glossy dark green, to 7.5 cm (3 in) high.
  • Roots: Fat taproot.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules cylindrical, widely separated.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 25 – 30, bristle-like, transparent white to yellowish.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Bell shaped, white to pale pink, 15 – 30 mm (0.6 – 1.2 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, pinkish white.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): March, april.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 1.400 to 1.900 m.
  • Comments: In cultivation it will make a much larger showing, to about 6 or 7 cm wide, and a little less tall, although by no means is it rapid growing. It will need a pot with sufficient depth. <br>mineral substrate.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 41.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 406.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. aureilanata var/fa alba

Mammillaria backebergiana ssp backebergiana

  • First description by Buchenau 1966

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, cylindrical, to 30 cm (12 in) high, 5 – 6 cm (2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: with latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Short pyramidal, not angled.
  • Axil: naked or with a few bristles.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 12, yellowish white with brown tips, becoming darker with age.
  • Central spine: 1 – 3, straight, needle-like, yellowish brown to brown, 7 – 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: Freely produced in several rings. Purplish red, 18 – 20 mm (0.7 – 0.8 in) long, 10 – 13 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in), in diameter. Stigmas green.
  • Fruit: dull green above, whitish below, tinting purplish red in maturity.
  • Seed: brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2° C
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guerrero, Michoacan and Mexico, Mexico. Altitude 1.400 – 1.600 m.
  • Comments: Probably the greatest problem with growing this species is that it will become a tall column with age, and tend to lean or tip over its pot. Easily flowered, backegeriana doesn?t present any special challenges.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 42.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 406.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria backebergiana ssp ernestii

  • First description by Fittkau Cact. Succ. Mex. 16(2): 36 (1971)

  • Body: Distinctly smaller than the type and more easily offsetting, shining dark green.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil:
  • Radial spine:
  • Central spine: 1, darker than type
  • Flower: darker than type.
  • Fruit:
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2° C
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Mexico and Guerrero, Mexico. Altitude 1.900 m.
  • Comments: A considerably smaller plant than backebergiana ssp backebergiana, this plant is easier to manage as it does not make tall solitary columns, but is more apt to form clusters with age. Otherwise, cultivation is the same as for backebergiana.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 43.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 407.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. backebergiana var ernestii
    <br>M. ernestii
    <br>M. isotensis

Mammillaria barbata

  • First description by Engelmann 1848

  • Body: Plants solitary or many-stemmed and forming dense clusters. Stems depressed globose to short cylindrical, 3 – 4 cm (1.2 – 1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Fairly poor root system.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Soft, globose to cylindrical.
  • Axil: naked.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 60, in more than one series, most hairlike, whitish to yellowish, sometimes with darker tips, 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, stiff, erect, brown to reddish-brown, to orange-brown, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long, 1 – 2 strongly hooked.
  • Flower: Pale pink to yellowish pink to orange to brownish to greenish, 15 – 30 mm (0.6 – 1.2 in) long and in diameter; outer perianth parts fringed.
  • Fruit: Oblong, green to purplish red to dark red, to 10 mm (0.4 in) in diameter.
  • Seed: Dark reddish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua and Durango, Mexico
    <br> Arizona and New Mexico, USA
    <br> Altitude 1.800 to 2.500 m.
  • Comments: This species is very sensitive and should be grown in a pot just big enough to accomodate the roots, in its correct potting mixture, containing important quantity of grit to assure free drainage. Overwatering should be avoided and exposure to strong light will favour spine development and flowering potential.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 44. <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 407.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. chavezei
    <br>M. garesii
    <br>M. morricalii
    <br>M. orestera
    <br>M. santa-clarensis
    <br><a href="http://www.mammillarias.net/gallery/syn_specie.php?searchstring=viridiflora&lg=uk">M. viridiflora</a>

    <br>M. wrightii var viridiflora

Mammillaria baumii

  • First description by Boedeker, Zeitschr. Sukkulentenk. 2:238 (1926)

  • Body: Plants forming dense clusters with the stems obscured by spines. Stems subglobose to ovoid, 5 – 7 cm (2 – 2.8 in) high, 13 – 15 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Soft, cylindrical to short conical.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 50, very thin, flexible, interlacing, white, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 5 – 11, slender, needle-like, straight, whitish yellow, 10 – 18 mm (0.4 – 0.7 in) long.
  • Flower: Broad funnelform, bright yellow, scented, 25 – 30 mm (1 – 1.2 in) long and in diameter. Stigmas green.
  • Fruit: Oblong to ovoid, gray-green.
  • Seed: Brown, pitted.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): May, June
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C
  • Habitat Substrate: Usually under bushes, also in shady rocky fissures on densely wooded hills.
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 700 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments: In spite of its preference for shade in the wild, in culture, good exposure to shunshine will favour good spine development. An easy grown species which will benefit from high levels of light and temperature. If grown correctly, it will reward the grower with generous displays of yellow flowers. Clumps will be formed quite readily over a few years.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 46. Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 407.
  • Synonymes: <br>Dolichethele baumii
    <br>M. radiaissima

Mammillaria beneckei

  • First description by Ehrenberg, Allg. Gartenz. 12: 401 (1844)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later forming large clumps to 50 cm (20 in) or more wide. Stems depressed globose to short cylindrical, green to greenish brown, to 10 cm (3.9 in) high and 7 cm (2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Broadly conical, soft, often becoming reddish or purplish.
  • Axil: with sparse bristles and little wool.
  • Radial spine: 12 – 15, fine, needle-like,white or yellow, with darker tips, 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 6, needle-like, brown or black, 8 – 12 mm (0.3 – 0.5 in) long, 1 – 2 longer and hooked.
  • Flower: Salverform, deep yellow, 20 – 25 mm (0.8 – 1 in) long, to 30 mm (1.2 in) in diameter. Stigmas orange.
  • Fruit: Slender, club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Very large, dark brown, rough.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Southern Mexico in Michoacan, Sinaloa, Colima, Jalisco, Mexico, Oaxacana and Guerrero. Altitude 50 to 1.600 m.
  • Comments: Very sensitive to low temperatures. Turns brown or reddish in intense light, which is needed to induce flowering.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 47. <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 407.
  • Synonymes: <br>Dolichothele aylostera
    <br>D. balsasoides
    <br>D. beneckei
    <br>D. nelsonii
    <br>Mammillaria aylostera
    <br>M. balsasensis
    <br>M. barkeri
    <br>M. beneclei var multiceps
    <br>M. colonensis
    <br>M. guiengolensis
    <br>M. nelsonii
    <br>Oehmea beneckei

Mammillaria berkiana

  • First description by Lau, Kakt. and Sukk. 37(2): 30 (1986)

  • Body: Plants solitary or clustering with up to 40 stems, globose, 4 to 6 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: naked.
  • Radial spine: 35 to 38, 6 mm long, the upper to 4 mm, white, fine, needle-like.
  • Central spine: 5 to 8, one more central, 2 to 4 hooked and 10 mm long, the others 4 to 5 mm long and straight, red-brown, whitish at base.
  • Flower: Deep purple pink, not widely opening, to 10 mm in diameter. Stigmas purple.
  • Fruit: Whitish to pink.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Jalisco, Mexico. Altitude 1.800 to 2.400 m
  • Comments: In culture, it needs good drainage (up to 50% grit content). Water should be carefully applied, as fits this cliff-dwelling species, and not too large a pot. This rarely found species is slow growing, but rewards the patient grower with displays of small dark pink flowers. Winter rest is important to stimulate flowering.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 49.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria blossfeldiana

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt.-Ges. 3: 209 (1931)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, occasionnally forming small clumps. Stems globose to short cylindrical, gray-green, to 5 cm (2 in) high, 3 – 4 cm (1.2 – 1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Short conical.
  • Axil: with scanty wool.
  • Radial spine: 15 – 20, yellow with dark tips, 5 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4, dark brown to black, 10 – 12 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) long, lowermost one erect and hooked, upper ones straight.
  • Flower: Funnelform, white with rose to carmine red midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long, 20 – 40 mm (0.8 – 1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, orange-red.
  • Seed: Black, pitted.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Flat, hot, dry desert, in decomposing granite and gravelly soil.
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California, Mexico. Altitude below 50 m.
  • Comments: Like most hooked spined species from Baja California, this species is prone to rotting if watering is not conservative. The careful grower will be rewarded with generous numbers of large white and pink flowers. Use very open potting soil to extend the life of this species.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 50.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 408.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. blossfeldiana var shurliana
    <br>M. shurliana

Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana

  • First description by Poselger, Allg. Gartenz 21: 94 (1853)

  • Body: Plants usually forming clusters. Stems globose, sometimes becoming somewhat cylindrical.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: some with bristles.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 50, white, hairlike, 8 – 20 mm (0.3 – 0.8 in) long, one, occasionnally two, hooked.
  • Central spine: 1 – 7, reddish brown, 5 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, creamy white to pinkish,, 13 – 22 mm (0.5 – 0.9 in) long, to 15 mm (0.6 in) in diameter
  • Fruit: Cylindrical, red.
  • Seed: Reddish brown, with partially lateral hilum.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 1.750 – 2.300 m.
  • Comments: One of the easiest species to grow and flower, this commonly available plant comes in a wide range of spination, flower color and hair. Easily clustering and easily flowered. Most plants will offset readily, and clumps can be produced in a very few years.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 51.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 408.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. bocasana var splendens <i>Hort</i>
    <br>M. bocasana var multilanata <i>Hort</i>

Mammillaria bocasana ssp eschauzieri

  • First description by Coulter, Contr. US Nat. Herb. 3: 104 (1894)

  • Body: Plants solitary or clustering from the base or higher, globose to short cylindrical, to 12 cm tall, 8 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: with fine white bristles.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 30, 4 to 15 mm long, white, slightly brown at tips, smooth.
  • Central spine: 1 – 7, one hooked, 15 to 25 mm long, the straight spines somewhat shorter and slightly, dark reddish brown, paler at the base, minutely pubescent.
  • Flower: Yellowish white with variable pink midstripe, 1.5 cm long, 1.5 to 2 cm wide. Stigmas yellow.
  • Fruit: Long, clavate, red, about 20 mm long, 5 mm wide.
  • Seed: Light reddish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi and Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 1.900 to 2.550 m.
  • Comments: same as M. bocasana ssp bocasana
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 52.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 408.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. eschanzieri
    <br>M. hirsuta
    <br>M. hirsuta var grandis
    <br>M. knebeliana
    <br>M. kunzeana
    <br>M. longicoma

Mammillaria bocensis

  • First description by Craig, Mamm. Handb. 56, fig. 38 (1945)

  • Body: Plants mostly solitary, occasionnally clustering with age. Stems depressed globose to short cylindrical, dark green with reddish to purplish tinge, 8 – 9 cm (3.1 – 3.5 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: with latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13, but also 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Firm, pyramidal, keeled.
  • Axil: With some white wool or naked.
  • Radial spine: 6 – 8, needle-like, chalky white to reddish with darker tips, 5 – 14 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1, reddish brown with dark tip, straight to slightly curving, 8 – 15 mm (0.3 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Wide funnelform, pale pink to greenish, with brownish midveins, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long.
  • Fruit: Thick, club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Light brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C.
  • Habitat Substrate: In salty flats of coastal plain, deep-seated under bushes and adjacent to the beach
  • Geographic Distribution: Sonora, Sinaloa, Jalisco and Nayarit, Mexico. Altitude from almost sealevel to 900 m.
  • Comments: Capable of forming large clumps, this species has no particular special demands, except patience. Growth is enhanced by repotting at regular intervals, but the grower should not try to force faster growth with too frequent watering and fertilizer. Does not require the very strongest light in the greenhouse, but flowering will benefit from high light levels.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 53.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 409.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. bocensis var movasana
    <br>M. bocensis var rubida
    <br>M. neoschwarzeana
    <br>M. rubida

Mammillaria boelderliana

  • First description by Wolschlager, Kakt. and Sukk. 39(4): 78 (1988)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globose, blue-green, 1 – 3 cm (0.4 – 1.2 in) high, 2.5 – 5.5 (1 – 1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Tuberous, long, thick.
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Widely separated, conical.
  • Axil: naked.
  • Radial spine: None.
  • Central spine: 4 – 5, needle-like, yellowish brown, 4 – 7 mm (to 0.3 in) long, the lower longer, straight or slightly curving, grey-brown with darker tips.
  • Flower: Funnelform, witish with pinkish midveins, 18 – 20 mm (0.7 – 0.8 in) long, 20 – 24 mm (0.8 – 0.9 in) in diameter. Stigmas yellow.
  • Fruit: Pear shaped, red, 7 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Seed: Dark brown or black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: 0° C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 2.300 m.
  • Comments: This species has a root at least five times the height of the stem above the ground.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 54.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 409.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria bombycina

  • First description by Quehl, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 20: 149 with fig. (1910)

  • Body: Plants often forming clumps to 80 cm (31 in) wide. Stems depressed globose to club shaped, bright green, 7 – 14 cm (2.8 – 5.5 in) high, 5 – 6 cm (2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Occasionally latex in tubercules.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules conical to cylindrical, firm.
  • Axil: With dense wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 64, stiff, thin, needle-like, glassy white, to yellowish white to 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 8, yellow with dark tips, or reddish brown, lowermost one hooked and to 20 mm (0.8 in) long, others straight and to 11 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, pink to white, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Pale pinkish green.
  • Seed: Dark reddish brown, with partially lateral hilum.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Aguascalientes and Jalisco, Mexico. Altitude 2.340 to 2.500 m.
  • Comments: One of the most popular and readily available Mammillaria, this species will produce large clumps. One of the easier species to grow, it is an easy bloomer.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 55.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 409.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria boolii

  • First description by Lindsay, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 25(2): 48, fig. 39 (1953)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, occasionally clustering. Stems globose to short cylindrical, pale gray-green, to 3.5 cm (1.4 in) high and 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Round.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: About 20, needle-like, flattened against the stem surface, white, spreading, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: One, awl-like, strongly hooked, yellow to yellowish brown, with darker tip, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long.
  • Flower: Pink or lavender pink, to 25 mm (1 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Long, club shaped, orange.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): May, June , Jully, August, September
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Sonora, Mexico. Altitude sealevel.
  • Comments: Not one of the easiest species to grow in culture. Need extra gritty substrate (abt. 40% grit). Flowering from 3 cm diameter. A difficult species that requires a winter rest from watering to induce flowering. Careful attention must be paid to watering the rest of the year, as Boolii is especially prone to rotting without warning. Warmth even during winter is appreciated.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 57.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 409.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria brachytrichion

  • First description by L?thy, Kakt. and Sukk. 38(12): 294-7 (1987)

  • Body: Plants solitary or clustering. Stems depressed globose to short cylindrical, dark green, 1 – 2 cm (0.4 – 0.8 cm) in hight, 1.5 – 4 cm (0.6 – 1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 26 – 32, whitish to yellowish brown, with dark tips, needle-like, stiff, straight, 7 – 10 mm long.
  • Central spine: 7 – 11, fine, needle-like, reddish brown with yellowish base, to 6 mm (0.2 in) long, one sometimes hooked, others straight.
  • Flower: Broad funnelform, white, sometimes with pink midveins, 10 – 12 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) long, 12 – 14 mm (0.5 – 0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Small, green.
  • Seed: Brownish black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Durango, Mexico. Altitude 1.500 to 1.700 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 58.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 410.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria brandegeei ssp brandegeei

  • First description by (Coulter) K. Brandegee, Erythea 5: 116 (1897)

  • Body: Plants solitary or clustering. Stems depressed globose to short cylindrical, dark green, to 9 cm (3.5 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules firm, square basally, conical above.
  • Axil: Woolly.
  • Radial spine: 8 – 10, whitish to yellowish brown with dark tips, needle-like, stiff, straight, 7 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, reddish brown with darker tips, straight, stout, 10 – 12 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) long.
  • Flower: Greenish yellow, brownish yellow, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long.
  • Fruit: Slow ripening, dull pink.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2° C.
  • Habitat Substrate: Amongst rocks, but also among other vegetation, often at the base of larger plants.
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California Peninsula, Mexico. Altitude at almost sea level to about 200 m.
  • Comments: Don?t expect this species to grow to great size. Patience is required to maintain the slow growth. This species is sensitive to cooler temperatures.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 59.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 410.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. brandegeei var magdalenensis <i>nom. inval.</i>

Mammillaria brandegeei ssp gabbii

  • First description by Coulter, Contrib. US. Nat. Herb. 3: 109 (1894)

  • Body: Stems only 5 – 10 cm
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil:
  • Radial spine: 11 – 15
  • Central spine: 1 – 2
  • Flower: Yellowish.
  • Fruit:
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: The most Northern of this species.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 60.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 410.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. gabbii

Mammillaria brandegeei ssp glareosa

  • First description by Houghton, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 7(6): 88 (1935)

  • Body: Flattened globose, small, pulled down to soil level.
  • Roots: Fleshy roots in the crevices.
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: four-angled
  • Axil: Woolly.
  • Radial spine: 9 – 10, up to 5 mm long, the upper 2 or 3 thin and whitish, the lower thicker and brown.
  • Central spine: 1, 6 mm long, brown.
  • Flower: 12 mm long, pale greenish yellow with reddish brown midstrip on the outer petals.
  • Fruit: Light pink, white below.
  • Seed: Reddish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California, Mexico, at low altitude.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 60.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 410.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. dawsonii
    <br>M. glareosa

Mammillaria brandegeei ssp lewisiana

  • First description by Lindsay, Des. PL. Life 11: 167 (1939) – as M. lewisiana

  • Body: Plants solitary, flattened to globular, to 7 cm tall and 11 cm wide.
  • Roots: Thick.
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With a short tuft of white wool.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 13, 6 to 10 mm long, light grey with brown tips.
  • Central spine: 1 – 3, long and curling over the crown of the plant, the uppermost to 20 mm long, curved upwards, the lower 8 mm, all purple-black.
  • Flower: 2 cm long, 1 cm wide, greenish yellow.
  • Fruit: White to pink.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California, Mexico. Altitude 100 – 150 m.
  • Comments: A collectors' plant with a quite different appearance from the type.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 61.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 410.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. lewisiana

Mammillaria candida

  • First description by Scheidweiler, Bull Acad. Sci. Brux. 5:496 (1838)

  • Body: Plants solitary or clustering. Stems depressed globose to elongated, blue-green, to 30 cm (12 in) high, 6 – 14 cm (2.4 – 2.5 in) in diameter, covered by dense white spines.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Broadly cylindrical, obtuse, not grooved.
  • Axil: With 4 to 7 white bristles.
  • Radial spine: As many as 120, white, spreading, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 8 – 12, white with pinkish tips, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Rose pink or white with greenish red midveins, 2 – 3 cm (0.8 – 1.2 in) in diameter; pericarpels and floral tubes naked.
  • Fruit: Ovoid, red to pink to whitish, juicy, indehiscent, 7 – 14 mm (0.3 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Black, with flat or domed testa, not pitted, 1 mm in diameter.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Well drained, rocky crevices.
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, San Luis Potosi and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 500 to 2.500 m.
  • Comments: In culture, open, free draining substrate. Limestone added to the potting soil is beneficial; watering should be done with care to avoid rotting. To encourage the development of the heavy white spination, light levels should be high.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 62.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 451.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. candida var caespitosa
    <br>M. candida var estanzuelensis
    <br>M. candida ssp ortizrubiona
    <br>M. candida var rosea
    <br>M. estanzuelensis
    <br><a href="http://www.mammillarias.net/gallery/syn_specie.php?searchstring=ortizrubiona&lg=uk">M. ortizrubiona</a>
    <br>Mammilloydia candida

Mammillaria canelensis

  • First description by Craig, Mamm. Handb. 307, fig 279 (1945)

  • Body: Plants solitary, eventually producing several stems. Stems globose, to 5 cm (2 in) or more high and 11 cm (4.3 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules conical.
  • Axil: With dense long wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 8 – 25, fine, needle like, white, 5 – 15 mm (0.2 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, occassionally as many as 10, needle-like, stiff, sometimes straight, but usually curving, orangish yellow to reddish brown, to 30 mm (1.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Yellow or pink, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Purplish red
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua, Mexico. Altitude 1.700 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments: This is an easy species. Care should be taken to retain the heavy wool that forms in the axils. Normally a tough species that can be accustomed to full sunlight if care is given to slowly increase light levels.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 64.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 410.
  • Synonymes: <br>M.auricantha
    <br>M. auritricha
    <br>M. bellacantha
    <br>M. floresii
    <br>M. laneusumma / lanisumma
    <br>M. mayensis
    <br>M. montensis

Mammillaria capensis

  • First description by Gates, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 4(11): 372 (1933)

  • Body: Plants forming small clumps. Stems cylindrical, olive green, to 25 cm (9.8 in) high, 3 – 5 cm (1.2 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With one to three short bristles.
  • Radial spine: 13, needle-like, reddish brown to black with whitish bases, 8 – 15 mm (0.3 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, stiff, needle-like, reddish brown to black with whitish bases, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long, usually hooked.
  • Flower: Funnelform, pink or white, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter. Greenish yellow stigmas. Outer petals have a brownish stripe.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Black, pitted.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Flat, sandy areas near the Pacific Ocean coastline. Often growing at the bases of the trees.
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California Sur, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 65.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 410.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. capensis var pallida

Mammillaria carmenae

  • First description by Castenada, A. Inst. Biol. Mex. 24(2): 233 (1953)

  • Body: Plants clustering. Stems globose to ovoid, 4 – 10 cm (1.6 – 3.9 in) high, 3 – 4 cm (1.2 – 1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules conical.
  • Axil: Woolly and bristly.
  • Radial spine: More than 100, white or pale yellow to 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: White to pink to pale pink, with pink tinge, to 11 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Fruit: Greenish.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 850 to 1.900 m.
  • Comments: In spite of considerable hybridization between this species and M. lauii by specialized nurseries, NOT ALL pink flowering plants are necessarily hybrids ! A pink flowering species really does exist in the wild.
    <br>This is easily grown into clumps, but it does often have an irregular pattern of offsetting. Full light will maintain the colorful and tight spination as long as growth is not forced. Flowering often takes place in winter, or early spring.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 66.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 410.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria carnea

  • First description by Zuccarini ex Pfeiffer, Enum. Cact. 19 (1837)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first but clustering with age. Stems globose to cylindrical to 20 cm (7.9 in) high, 8 – 12 cm (3.1 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules firm, pyramidal, distinctly angled.
  • Axil: Usually woolly.
  • Radial spine: Absent or only bristles.
  • Central spine: Usually 4, rigid, straight to arching, pinkish brown with black tips, 8 – 20 mm (0.3 – 0.8 in) long, uppermost ones longest. Spines reaching nearly 10 cm are not unusual.
  • Flower: Funnelform, pale pink or pale rose, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long, 12 – 15 mm (0.5 – 0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guerrero, Puebla and Oaxacana, Mexico. Altitude 500 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments: A clumping species that takes a long time to grow to good size. No special requirements for successful cultivation, as it is generally an undemanding species.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 68.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 411.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. carnea var robustispina

Mammillaria carretii

  • First description by Rebut ex K. Schumann, Gesamtb. Kakt. 542 (1898)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed globose to short cylindrical, 5 – 6 cm (2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Slightly cylindrical, 7 – 9 mm long, soft.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked, with one to four bristles.
  • Radial spine: 12 – 14, needle-like, slightly curved, yellowish, to 13 mm (0.5 in) long, finely pubescent.
  • Central spine: 1, awl-like, hooked, brownish, 14 – 18 mm (0.6 – 0.7 in) long, finely pubescent, chestnut brown.
  • Flower: Long funnelform, creamy white with rose-coloured midveins, to 25 mm (1 in) long and 15 mm (0.6 in) in diameter. Stigmas greenish.
  • Fruit: Slender, green.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Shaley, barren slopes.
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila and Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Altitude 700 to 1.400 m.
  • Comments: Not particularly easy; losing roots and subsequently a loss of plant mass are problems that can be partially corrected with consistent conservative watering. Benefits from warmth in winter.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 69.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 411.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. saffordii

Mammillaria cerralboa

  • First description by Britton & Rose, Cact. 4: 116 (1923) – as Neomammillaria.

  • Body: Plants solitary, rarely clustering. Stems slender cylindrical, to 20 cm (7.9 in) high, 3 – 4 cm (1.2 – 1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Yellowish green, conical to cylindrical, firm.
  • Axil: With short bristels.
  • Radial spine: About 10, yellow, straight, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, sometimes hooked, stout, yellowish, 10 – 20 mm (0.4 – 0.8 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, white with pinkish brown midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter. Stigmas purplish brown.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, greenish to muddy purplish red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2° C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California Sur, Mexico. Altitude 10 to 200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 70.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 411.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. armillata ssp cerralboa

Mammillaria chionocephala

  • First description by J.A. Purpus, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 16: 41 with fig. (1916)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems depressed globose to short cylindrical, light green, 15 – 20 cm (5.9 – 7.9 in) high, 9 – 10 cm (3..5 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Crowded, pyramidal..
  • Axil: With abundant white wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 22 – 24, bristle-like, white, to 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, rarely as many as 6, white with darker tips, to 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Flower: White to pale rose pink, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Carmine red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4° C
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila, Nuevo Leon and Durango, Mexico. Altitude 1.800 to 2.400 m.
  • Comments: A slow grower that forms columns with alternating bands of heavy white wool with areas of less wool. A cool winter rest period seems to help with flowering.
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 71.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 411.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. caerulea
    <br>M. formosa ssp chionocephala
    <br>M. ritteriana

Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp albiarmata

  • First description by Boedeker, Jahrb. Deutsch. Kakt. Ges. 1: 67 (1935 – 1936)

  • Body: Plants solitary, strongly tuberculate basally. Stems flattened globose, blue-green, to 5 cm (2 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules three-angled in cross section.
  • Axil: Sparsely woolly.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 25, white or creamy white tipped orange-pink, becoming yellowish brown.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Broad funnelform, white with pinkish midveins, up to 20 mm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Dark brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 to 1.230 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 73.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 411.
  • Synonymes:
    M. albiarmata

    M. coahuilensis var albiarmata

    M. coahuilensis var albiflora

    Porfiria schwartzii var albiflora

Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp coahuilensis

  • First description by Boedeker, Zeitschr. Sukkulentenk. 2: 210 – 213 (1926) – as Porfiria.

  • Body: Plants solitary, strongly tuberculate basally. Stems flattened globose, blue-green, to 5 cm (2 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules three-angled in cross section.
  • Axil: Sparsely woolly.
  • Radial spine: About 16, thin, bristle-like, slightly pubescent with darker tips, to 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, straight, needle-like, white, brown-tipped, to 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Broad funnelform, white with pinkish midveins, up to 30 mm (0.8 – 1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Dark brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Cracks in the dry lake at the Laguna de Viesca.
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 to 1.230 m.
  • Comments: Other than care with watering, which all thick rooted species require, and patience to match its slow growth, this species has few special demands. During the winter rest, the plant may pull near the surface of the potting mix.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 72.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 411.
  • Synonymes:
    M. heyderi ssp coahuilensis

    M. schwarzii

    Porfiria schwartzii

Mammillaria columbiana ssp columbiana

  • First description by Salm-Dyck, Cact. Hort. Dyck. 1849: 99 (1850)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, rarely forming clumps, narrow columnar stem, 10 – 25 cm (3.9 – 9.8 in) high, 5 – 6 cm (2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Short conical.
  • Axil: Woolly.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 20, bristle-like, white, 4 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 7, golden yellow, needle-like, straight, 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: Small, deep pink, barely protruding from the wool.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, orange-red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Jamaica, Colombia and Venezuela. Altitude 500 – 2.150 m.
  • Comments: Warmth throughout the year will increase the grower?s success. Subject to sunburn if exposed to direct sun for too long. Seems to tolerate moisture around the roots somewhat better than most species.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 74.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 412.
  • Synonymes:
    M. bogotensis

    M. columbiana var albescens

    M. columbiana var bogotensis

    M. hennisii

    M. soehlemanii

Mammillaria columbiana ssp yucatanensis

  • First description by Quehl, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 15: 173 (1905)

  • Body: Clustering, with erect, cylindrical stem, to 10 – 15 cm tall, 3 – 6 cm wide.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Woolly.
  • Radial spine: About 20, white.
  • Central spine: 4, occasionally 5, yellowish- or reddish-brown, much stouter than the radials, 6 – 8 mm long.
  • Flower: Very small, pink.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Yucatan and Chiapas, Mexico; Honduras, Guatamala.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 75.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 412.
  • Synonymes:
    M. chiapensis
    M. ruestii

    M. yucatanensis

Mammillaria compressa ssp centralifera

  • First description by Reppenhagen, Gatt. Mamm. 153 (1987)

  • Body: Often solitary, but sometimes clumping.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil:
  • Radial spine: 4 – 5, straight or curving, 2 – 12 mm long, whitish with black tips.
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, exceptionally long (to about 6 cm), downwards pointing, chalky white with very dark brown tips.
  • Flower: Bell shaped, purplish pink, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, Tamaulipas and San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 850 – 2.150 m.
  • Comments: In cultivation, full sunshine is need to achieve the spine length.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 77.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 412.
  • Synonymes:
    M. centralifera

Mammillaria compressa ssp compressa

  • First description by De Candolle, Mem. Mus. Nat. Hist. Paris 17: 112 (1828)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later forming massive clumps to 1 m (3.3 ft) wide. Stems club shaped to cylindrical, bluish gray-green, to 20 cm (7.9 in) high, 5 – 10 cm (2 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Close set, firm, bluntly angled, keeled.
  • Axil: With wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 4 – 6, unequal, chalky white with brownish tips, 20 – 70 mm (0.8 – 2.8 in) long, some very short.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Bell shaped, purplish pink, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 2.240 m.
  • Comments: Needs lots and lots of space to grow. A robust species that will form large clumps rather rapidly when compared to other Mammillaria species. To have the best appearance, it should be kept growing on in a regular fashion, with the usual rest in winter. No special requirements.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 76.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 412.
  • Synonymes:
    M. angularis

    M. bernalensis

    M. esseriana

    M. tolimensis

Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita

  • First description by De Candolle, Mem. Mus. Nat. Hist. Paris, 17: 112 (1828)

  • Body: Plants solitary and clustering. Stems globose, dark green, 1 – 8 cm (0.4 – 3.1 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules not compact, conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: Some with bristles, sparsely woolly.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 29, flattened against the stem surface to ascending, radiating, usually awl shaped, sometimes hairlike, white to yellow, variably finely pubescent, 6 – 9 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 0 – 7, occasionally more, sometimes absent, awl shaped, yellowish to red to dark brown, to 16 mm (0.6 in) long, one or two occasionally hooked.
  • Flower: Variable, funnelform, less deep set, yellowish white to white to very pale magenta, rarely magenta, 10 – 20 mm (0.4 – 0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Globose to ovate, green to bright red.
  • Seed: Brownish black coarsely pitted.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Zacatecas, Guanajuato, Michoacan, Queretaro, Aguascalientes and Hidalgo, Mexico. Altitude 1.400 to 2.300 m.
  • Comments: An easy species in cultivation, with offsets formed at irregular intervals. Offsets are easily detached and rooted. Doesn?t tolerate full sun.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 78.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 412.
  • Synonymes:
    M. aureoviridis

    M. aurihamata

    M. brevicrinita

    M. crinita var pauciseta

    M. criniformis

    M. erectohamata

    M. felipensis

    M. leucantha

    M. moeller-valdeziana

    M. painteri

    M. puberula

    M. schelhasei

    M. seideliana sensu Reppenhagen

    M. variabilis

Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii

  • First description by A. Dietrich, Allg. Gartenz. 4: 137 (1836) – as M. wildii.

  • Body: Plants clustering, globose to shortly columnar, 4 to 5 cm in diameter, dark green.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With 0 to 2 bristles to 7 mm, and wool.
  • Radial spine: 11 to 15, whitish, smooth, 4 to 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: 3 or 4, yellow to yellowish brown, one hooked, to 6 mm long, minutely pubescent.
  • Flower: Brownish yellow, to about 14 mm in diameter. Stigmas greenish white.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brownish black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Mexico. Altitude 1.500 to 1.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 79.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – referred to M. glochidiata
  • Synonymes:
    M. calleana

    M. wildii

Mammillaria crucigera ssp crucigera

  • First description by Martius, Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. 16: 340, t. 27 (1832)

  • Body: Plants almost always forking dichotomously into 2 or more heads with maturity. Stems flattened globose to short cylindrical, olive green to gray-green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) high and 5 – 6 cm (2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Tubercules with latex in growing season.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules firm, not sharply angled, keeled.
  • Axil: With sparse white wool.
  • Radial spine: 22 – 30, finely needle-like or bristly, white, to 2 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 5, yellowish or brown, rigid, to 2 mm long.
  • Flower: Small, funnelform, purplish pink, rarely rising above the spines.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Small, brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxacana, Mexico. Altitude 800 to 950 m.
  • Comments: Slow growth is the hallmark of this species. Crucigera ssp crucigera divides dichotomously and also offsets lower on the plant body, while ssp tlalocii forms simple columns without dividing or offsetting.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 80.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 413.
  • Synonymes:
    M. buchenaui

    M. crucigera var grandinosa (?)

Mammillaria crucigera ssp tlalocii

  • First description by Reppenhagen, Gatt. Mamm. 120 (1987)

  • Body: Plants globose, later columnar, curving pipe-shaped, to 20 cm long, 5 to 7 cm wide, seldom clustering.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: White-wooled.
  • Radial spine: 16 to 22, glassy white, 1 to 2 mm long, the longer sideways pointing.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, glassy white with brown tips.
  • Flower: Carmine-pink, 12 to 14 mm long, 8 to 10 mm wide. Stigmas red.
  • Fruit: Carmine.
  • Seed: Small, brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxacana, Mexico. Altitude 800 to 1.000 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 81.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 414.
  • Synonymes:
    M. tlalocii

Mammillaria decipiens ssp albescens

  • First description by Tiegel, Moeller’s, Deutsch. Gaertnerzeit. 48: 260 (1933)

  • Body: Plants forming dense clusters. Stems globose to club shaped, deep green, to 8 cm high, 5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules somewhat soft, cylindrical to obtuse.
  • Axil: With sparse wool and a few bristles.
  • Radial spine: 3 – 5, white, straight, generally shorter than the type.
  • Central spine: Absent, rarely 1, about 15 mm long, whitish with sometimes brownish tips, thin, straight, flexible.
  • Flower: Broadly funnelform, white, sometimes greenish in the lower parts, and with a brownish midstripe on the outer petals, to about 1 cm long. Stigmas yellowish.
  • Fruit: Yellowish green or whitish green.
  • Seed: Brown..
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Under shrubs.
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato and Queretaro, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 82.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 414.
  • Synonymes:
    Dolichothele albescens

    M. albescens

    M. decipiens var albescens

Mammillaria decipiens ssp camptotricha

  • First description by Dams, Gartenwelt 10: 14 (1905/1906) – as M. camptotricha

  • Body: Plants making a large, flattish clump of stems, each about 4 – 7 cm in diameter, clustering from the lower part.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Green, flabby tubercules about 2 cm long.
  • Axil: Sparsely hairy with a few bristles.
  • Radial spine: Usually 4 – 5, but varying from 2 to 8, to 3 cm long, thin, flexible, curling, yellow, or white, or brown, interlacing densely in full light.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Small, white, deeply set in the tubercules, to about 1.5 cm long and wide.
  • Fruit: Pale pink to greenish.
  • Seed: Light brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.700 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments: Common name "bird's nest mammillaria"
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 83.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 414.
  • Synonymes: <br>Dolichothele camptotricha
    <br>M. camptotricha

Mammillaria decipiens ssp decipiens

  • First description by Scheidweiler, Bull. Acad. Sci. Brux. 5: 496 (1838)

  • Body: Plants forming dense clusters. Stems globose to club shaped, deep green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) high, 4 – 7 cm (1.6 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules somewhat soft, cylindrical to obtuse.
  • Axil: With sparse wool and a few bristles.
  • Radial spine: 5 – 11, white, sometimes brown tipped, needle-like, sometimes bristle-like, 7 – 15 mm (0.3 – 0.6 in) long or as long as 30 mm (1.2 in).
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, sometimes absent, slender, needle-like, straight, brown, 18 – 27 mm (0.7 – 1.1 in) long.
  • Flower: Broadly funnelform, white, delicately scented, 15 – 18 mm (0.6 – 0.7 in) long.
  • Fruit: Cylindrical, green with reddish tint.
  • Seed: Light brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Guanajuato and Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.550 to 2.150 m.
  • Comments: Easy to grow, and fairly fast to form clumps. Does better than most species in lower levels of light, but still prefers bright light or morning sun.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 82.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 414.
  • Synonymes:
    Dolichothele decipiens

Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp deherdtiana

  • First description by Farwig, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 41(1): 28 (1969)

  • Body: Solitary in habitat but clustering from the base in cultivation. Stems to 2.5 cm (1 in) in high and about 5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots: fibrous.
  • Sap: sans latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8-13
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly or naked.
  • Radial spine: 33 – 36, fine, needle-like, slightly curved 3 to 6 mm long, yellow becoming white.
  • Central spine: 1 – 6 or more, but they appear with age so they are often viewed without any one, sometimes absent, 3 to 7 mm long, fine, needle-like, nearly erect, reddish brown to yellow.
  • Flower: Long funnelform, bright rose violet to 5 cm in diameter, with a 2 cm long flower tube very distinct. Stigmas are white.
  • Fruit: Globose with 3 to 4 mm diameter, coulour is pale-green, half embedded in stems.
  • Seed: Dark brown to black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): March, April.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: barren rocky soil
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxacana, Mexico.
  • Comments: In culture, organic substrate.
    Slow growing species that will form irregular clumps with time. Be sure to limit water and fertilizers more than with faster growers. Spine formation is enhanced by bright light. Considered more difficult than the average Mammillaria species.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 84.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 414.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii

  • First description by Bravo, Cact. Suc. Mex. 15(1): 3 (1970) -as M. dodsonii

  • Body: stem up 3 cm tall and 4 cm diameter.
  • Roots: fribrous.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: naked.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 21, the lowest longest, to 20 mm long, needle-like white.
  • Central spine: 3 – 5 and 10 to 20 mm long with a reddish-brown colour and stronger than the radial, the form is straight or little curving.
  • Flower: Large and up to 4 cm with a 2cm long flower tube very distinct, colour is purple.
  • Fruit: Globose with 3 to 4 mm diameter, coulour is pale-green.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): March, April.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: from MEXICO in the state of OAXACA. Altitude 3.100 m.
  • Comments: Cultivation is more easy than for species deherdtiana. Organic substrate.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 85.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 414.
  • Synonymes:
    M. dodsonii

    M. deherdtiana var dodsonii

    M. greenwoodii nom. nud.

Mammillaria densispina

  • First description by Coulter, Contr. US. Nat. Herb. 3: 96 (1894)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems globose to short cylindrical, dark green, to 12 cm (4.7 in) high and 6 cm (2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules firm to flabby, conical.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: About 25, unequal, rigid, slender, needle-like, spreading, yellow, 8 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 6, straight, rigid, yellow, often with dark tips, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, pale yellow, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Greenish pink.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate: Thick moss on outcrops of rocks and on steep slopes in the shade of oak woodland.
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Guanajuato, Jalisco, Aguascalientes, Durango, Queretaro and Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 1.750 – 2.600 m.
  • Comments: Well-known, easy to grow, self-fertile species. Dense spination varying from all yellow spines to yellow radials and red-brown to dark brown central spines.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 87.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 414.
  • Synonymes:
    M. buxbaum(er)iana

Mammillaria dioica

  • First description by K. Brandegee, Erythea 5: 115 (1897)

  • Body: Plants solitary to clustering, sometimes branching. Stems cylindrical, blue-green, rounded apically, 10 – 25 cm and up to 33 cm (13 in) high, 3 – 7 cm (1.2 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules firm, short cylindrical.
  • Axil: With wool and 4 – 15 bristles as long as the tubercules.
  • Radial spine: 11 – 22, needle-like, straight, white, 5 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, sometimes absent, brown to brownish-black, needle-like, erect, stout, lowermost one hooked, upper ones straight, ascending, like the radials, 8 – 15 mm (0.3 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, imperfectly unisexual, occuring on functionally dioecious plants, white to yellowish white, sometimes with red midstripe, 10 – 30 mm (0.4 – 1.2 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped or ovoid, scarlet.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: California, USA and Baja California Peninsula and Sonora, Mexico.
  • Comments: Difficult, requiring the very best drainage.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 88.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 415.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria discolor

  • First description by Haworth, Syn. Pl. Succ. 177 (1812)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globose, depressed apically, blue-green, 23 – 4.5 cm (1.2 – 1.8 in) high, 6 – 11 cm (2.4 – 4.3 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules ovoid to conical.
  • Axil: With little wool or naked.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 28, needle-like, glassy white or slightly yellow, 8 – 9 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 7, dark brown becoming lighter with age, stout, straight, needle-like, glassy white or slightly yellow, 8 – 9 mm (.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, not opening widely, white with pink midveins, 20 – 27 mm (0.8 – 1.1 in) long, 12 – 16 mm (0.5 – 0.6 in) in diameter. Stigmas greenish yellow.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, greenish white but pink below.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxacana, Mexico, Hidalgo, Veracruz and Puebla, Mexico. Altitude 1.700 to 2.900 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 90.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 415
  • Synonymes:
    M. discolor var esperanzaensis

    M. discolor var longispina

    M. discolor var multispina

    M. discolor var ochoterenae

    M. discolor var schmollii

    M. esperanzaensis

    M. ochoterenae

    M. pachyrhiza

    M. schmollii

Mammillaria dixanthocentron

  • First description by Backeberg, Descr. Cact. Nov. 3: 8 (1963)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globose to short cylindrical to 20 cm (7.9 in) high, 7 – 8 cm (2.8 – 3 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: With scant wool at first, later with curly wool.
  • Radial spine: 19 – 20, thin, white, 2 – 4 mm long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, yellow, becoming brownish or whitish, with dark tips, upper one to 5 mm long, lower 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Small, light red to pale pinkish red.
  • Fruit: Yellow below, orange above.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca and Puebla, Mexico. Altitude 500 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments: No special treatment is needed, but growth slows down with maturity, and watering and fertilizing should be reduced accordingly. Bright light will encourage the best growth of spines.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 92.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 415.
  • Synonymes:
    M. dixanthocentron var rubrispina

Mammillaria duoformis

  • First description by Craig & Dawson, Allan Hancock Foundation Occ. Papers 1-2:59 with plate (1948)

  • Body: Plants usually forming clumps. Stems cylindrical, to 9 cm (3.5 in) high, 3 – 4 cm (1.2 – 1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Tubercules without latex, but latex present in the stem.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With bristles.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 20, slender, needle-like, straight, chalky white to pale yellow above, orange brown below, 5 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4, pinkish tan below, blackish brown above, 10 – 12 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) long, lowermost one hooked and longer.
  • Flower: Bright crimson, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and 12 mm (0.5 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Pale brownish pink.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
    (‘claviformis’ : 0? C.)
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla, Oaxacana and Morelos, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 2.400 m.
  • Comments: Easy to grow, but care must be taken to avoid sun scorch. Some forms can be fast growers, while others are average in speed. All will form large clumps with time.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 93.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 415
  • Synonymes:
    M. claviformis

    M. duoformis var rectiformis

    M. duaformis var xuchiapensis

    M. erythrocalix

    M. hamata (?)

    M. heeriana

    M. rossiana

Mammillaria elongata ssp echinaria

  • First description by De Candolle, Mem. Mus. Hist. Nat. Paris 17:110 (1828)

  • Body: Thicker stems as the type, 3 cm or so in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil:
  • Radial spine: Much more prominent, porrect radial spines as the type.
  • Central spine: Presence of 2 or 3 central spines, yellow or reddish brown.
  • Flower:
  • Fruit:
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Occuring more in open ground and on slopes.
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro and Hidalgo, Mexico. Altitude about 1.400 m.
  • Comments: In all other respects this subspecies is similar to the type.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 95.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 416.
  • Synonymes:
    M. echinaria

    M. elongata var echinaria

Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata

  • First description by De Candolle, Rev. Fam. Cact. in M?m. Mus. Hist. Nat. Paris 17: 109 (1828)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters of many stemmed plants. Stems elongated cylindrical, finger-like, 1 – 3 cm (0.4 – 1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules slender conical.
  • Axil: Naked or nearly so.
  • Radial spine: 14 – 25, variable in number, white to golden yellow to brown, the degree of brown colouring varying from plant to plant, slender, needle-like, 4 – 9 mm (to 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: Usually absent, sometimes 2, yellow to brownish, with dark tips, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Pale yellow to pinkish, sometimes flushed pink or with pink midstripes, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Pink, becoming red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Guanajuato, and Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.350 to 2.400 m.
  • Comments: This may be the most common Mammillaria to be found. It will form quite large clumps with hundreds of offsets if given time and grown properly. Light requirements include some protection from direct sunlight, but high levels of light will encourage tight growth and flowering. This is among the easiest Mammillaria to grow, and comes in many color and spine variations. It is average in its ability to tolerate low temperatures.
    Popular species, but many forms are hybrids, especially with Microhelia. Care should be taken to ensure that your plant is a true elongata. Elongata occurs in more variations than any other Mammillaria species. With time forms large clumps of recumbent stems.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 94.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 416.
  • Synonymes:
    M. elongata var anguinea

    M. elongata var densa

    M. elongata var echinata

    M. elongata var intertexta

    M. elongata var rufrocrocea

    M. elongata var stella-aura

    M. elongata var straminea

    M. elongata var subcrocea

    M. elongata var tenuis

    M. elongata var viperina

Mammillaria eriacantha

  • First description by Link & Otto ex Pfeiffer, enum. Cact. 32 (1837); & Beschr. u. Synon, 30 (1837).

  • Body: Plants solitary, rarely clustering. Stems narrow cylindrical, 30 – 50 cm (12 – 20 in) high, to 5 cm (2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Naked or slightly woolly in the nonflowering area, densely woolly in the flowering zone.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 24, bristle-like or finely needle-like, pale golden yellow, minutely pubescent, 4 – 5 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2, golden yellow, slightly pubescent, more or less equal, 8 – 10 mm ( 0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Small, greenish yellow, barely rising above the spines.
  • Fruit: Reddish purple.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: +5? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Veracruz, Mexico. Altitude 250 – 850 m.
  • Comments: Easy species to grow, but considered frost tender by some. Slow growth rate, but will form clusters of green stems. Flowers are unusually small and greenish yellow in color, so hand pollinators must be careful to look for flowers opening.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 96.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 416.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria erythrosperma

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 28: 101 (1918)

  • Body: Plants forming large clumps. Stems globose to short cylindrical, dark green, 4 – 5 cm (1.6 – 2 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules cylindrical.
  • Axil: With hair-like white bristles.
  • Radial spine: 15 – 20, thin, white, 8 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 3 , yellow with brownish red tips, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long, lowermost one hooked.
  • Flower: Carmine red, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Pinkish red, long.
  • Seed: Dark red to blackish.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Limestone rocks.
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 97.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 416.
  • Synonymes:
    M. multiformis

Mammillaria estebanensis

  • First description by Lindsay, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 39(1): 31 (1967)

  • Body: Plants solitary or clustering, sometimes branching. Stems cylindrical, gray-green, rounded apically, to 50 cm (20 in)high, 6 – 10 cm (2.4 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Firm, pyramidal.
  • Axil: With wool and 5 – 8 white bristles to 8 mm (0.3 in) long as the tubercules.
  • Radial spine: 15 – 22, needle-like, straight, brownish to golden white, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: One, brown with darker tip, straight or hooked, 4 – 15 mm (to 0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform or bell shaped, white, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and 25 mm (1 in) in diameter. Stigma-lobes light green.
  • Fruit: Red, 15 – 20 mm long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Esteban and San Lorenzo Islands, Baja California, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 98.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 416.
  • Synonymes:
    M. angelensis var estebanensis

    M. dioica ssp estebanensis

Mammillaria evermanniana

  • First description by Britton & Rose, Cact. 4: 97, with fig. (1923) – as Neomammillaria.

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems globose to short and thick cylindrical, light green, 5 – 7 cm (2 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Densely woolly and bristly, especially at first.
  • Radial spine: 12 – 15, thin, needle-like, white with dark tips, 8 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3, erect or nearly so, white with dark tips, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Yellowish cream with greenish tint, with pinkish brown midveins, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Cerralvo Island, Sea of Cortez, Mexico.
  • Comments: Care with low temperatures is the most critical growing requirement of this species, but high intensity of light is needed to stimulate flowering. White wool will become quite heavy with time under good growing conditions.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 99.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 417.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria fittkaui

  • First description by Glass & Foster, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 43(3): 116 (1971)

  • Body: Plants forming globular clumps. Stems cylindrical, bright green to dark green to gray-green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) high, 4 – 5 cm (1.6 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules tapered cylindrical, rounded apically.
  • Axil: Some with bristles to 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Radial spine: 6 – 8, smooth, straight, fine, needle-like, white, sometimes with dark tips, 5 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 4, dark brown, to 9 mm (0.4 in) long, lower one erect and strongly hooked, others like the radials.
  • Flower: White, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and 20 mm (0.8 in) in diameter. Stigmas white.
  • Fruit: White to pink, with pinkish base, to 7 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Seed: Brownish black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Rocks.
  • Geographic Distribution: Jalisco and Guanajuato, Mexico. Altitude about 1.500 m.
  • Comments: Easy to grow, and will produce irregular mounds with time. Fairly fast in growth. Can sunburn easily, so care should be taken to slowly increase exposure to strong light. Does better at moderate to bright light level.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 100.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 417.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria flavicentra

  • First description by Backeberg, Descr. Cact. Nov. 3: 8 (1963)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems club shaped to cylindrical, to 18 cm (7.1 in) high, 9 – 10 cm (3.5 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Pyramidal.
  • Axil: Woolly.
  • Radial spine: 22 – 24, glassy white, 2 – 4 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 6, yellowish, 5 – 6 mm ( 0.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Red, 3 – 4 mm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, pink above, whitish green below, to 15 mm 0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca and Puebla, Mexico. Altitude 1.250 – 2.250 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 101.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 417.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa

  • First description by Galeotti, ex Scheidweiler, Bull. Acad. Sci. Brux. 5: 497 (1838)

  • Body: Plants solitary, sometimes clustering with age. Stems depressed globose to short cylindrical, light green, 15 – 20 cm (5.7 – 7.9 in) high, 9 – 10 cm (3.5 – 3.9 in) or more in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Tubercules with latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Crowded, pyramidal.
  • Axil: With white wool.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 22, sometimes absent, thin, needle- or bristle-like, sometimes flattened, white, 3 – 6 mm (to 0.2 in) long)
  • Central spine: 4 – 7, usually 6, pinkish with darker tips, to 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: Pale pink, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Light brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila, Aguascalientes, Guanajuato, Zacatecas, Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon and San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 960 – 2.350 m.
  • Comments: Given enough time, M. Formosa will form mounds. The heavier spined forms can be placed in very bright light, or perhaps in the dappled shade of a tree or shrub. Needs no special care, but an open gritty potting mix with some limestone may be beneficial. Subspecies Microthele should be grown conservatively to preserve the flat habit that is present in the wild.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 102.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 417.
  • Synonymes:
    M. arroyensis

Mammillaria formosa ssp microthele

  • First description by Muehlenpfordt, Allg. Gartenz. 16:11 (1848)

  • Body: Plants flattened globose. Dividing dichotomously.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil:
  • Radial spine: 22 – 24 flattened and bristle-like radials.
  • Central spine:
  • Flower: Nearly pure white flowers.
  • Fruit:
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 2.200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 103.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 417.
  • Synonymes:
    M. microthele

Mammillaria formosa ssp pseudocrucigera

  • First description by Craig, Mamm. Handb. 101 (1945)

  • Body: Solitary. Stems flat-globose, to about 9 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Very dense wool.
  • Radial spine: 18, often lacking on mature areoles, 1 – 2 mm long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 6, white, tipped dark brown to black, 3 – 4 mm long.
  • Flower: Broadly pink stripped with white margins.
  • Fruit: Bright red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro and Guanajuato, Mexico. Altitude about 2.000 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 104.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 417-418.
  • Synonymes:
    M. pseudocrucigera

Mammillaria fraileana

  • First description by Britton & Rose 1923, Neomammillaria fraileana.

  • Body: makes small clusters of cylindrics stems of 15 cm long for 3 cm wide. Body often reddish if grown in full light.
  • Roots: fibrous.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil:
  • Radial spine: 11 to 12, 8 to 10 mm long, thin and white.
  • Central spine: 3 to 4, 10 mm long colour dark brown, with one central spine hooked.
  • Flower: White-Pink with deeper midstripe, 25 mm Long and wide, stigma bright carmine-pink.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): May – June – July – August – September
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate: Non calcerous rocks.
  • Geographic Distribution: Reported from MEXICO in BAJA CALIFORNIA State on the Coast of Gulf of California, near La Paz, Cabo san Lucas, Todos santos…
  • Comments: In culture, mineral substrate.
    Can be sensitive to frost. Requires bright light to reach its full potential. Careful watering and an open potting soil are a must. Pilbeam suggests that this species does better with no limestone in the soil.
  • Bibliography:
    Britton & Rose (1923) – the Cactaceae Vol 4 – page 157
    Mitteilungsblatt des Arbeitskreises f?r Mammillarienfreunde (1992)
    Hunt (1997) – Mammillaria Poscript n?6 – page 5
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File – Page 105
  • Synonymes:
    M. albicans ssp fraileana

Mammillaria gasseriana

  • First description by Boedeker, Zeitschr. Sukkulentenk. 3: 75 with fig. (1927)

  • Body: Plants branching basally to form clumps. Stems globose to short ovoid with sunken tips, 3 – 4 cm (1.2 – 1.6 in) in diameter, covered by white spines.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Densely arranged, cylindical, rounded apically.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 40 – 50, sometimes pectinate or flattened against the stem surface, white, 5 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, sometimes absent, hooked and erect, stout, light brown with dark tips, 4 – 8 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: Wide funnelform, whitish cream with light brown midveins and greenish throats, 7 – 8 mm (0.3 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, brownish red, 6 – 9 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Seed: Blackish gray.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: 0? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila, Mexico. Altitude 1.020 – 1.260 m.
  • Comments: It is one of the more difficult in cultivation, being very prone to excess water, and needing good drainage by way of gritty, open substrate, and a shallow pot.
    To retain the closely spaced spines, grow it conservatively and in very bright light, but avoid direct sun.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 106.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 418.
  • Synonymes:
    M. chica

    M. viescensis

Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina

  • First description by Haworth, Phil. Mag. 63:42 (1824)

  • Body: Plants forming large clumps that appear white. Stems short cylindrical, light green, to 18 cm (7.1 in) high and 8 cm (3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Rounded.
  • Axil: With white wool and 10 – 20 long white bristles.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 20, needle-like, chalky white, interlacing, 5 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2, erect, straight to slightly curved, white with dark tips, to 40 mm (1.6 in) or more long.
  • Flower: Deep pink to carmine red, with darker midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Carmine red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Queretaro and San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 1.850 m.
  • Comments: A variable species that can form very large clumps with time. No special treatment, but as much light as possible without burning the plant will encourage the heaviest spine formation.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 107.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 418.
  • Synonymes:
    M. geminispina var brevispina

    M. geminispina var nivea

    M. geminispina var nobilis

Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra

  • First description by Berg, Allg. Gartenz. 8: 130 (1840)

  • Body: Plants forming large clumps that appear white. Stems short cylindrical, light green, to 18 cm (7.1 in) high and 8 cm (3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Rounded.
  • Axil: With white wool and 10 – 20 long white bristles.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 20, needle-like, chalky white, interlacing, 5 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 5 – 6, erect, straight to slightly curved, pure white, to 40 mm (1.6 in) or more long.
  • Flower: Deep pink to carmine red, with darker midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Carmine red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Queretaro and San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 900 – 1.500 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 108.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 418.
  • Synonymes:
    M. albata

    M. albata var longispina

    M. albata var sanciro

    M. leucocentra

Mammillaria gigantea

  • First description by Hildmann ex Schumann, Gesamtb. Kakt. 578 (1898)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed globose, blue-green, 9 – 10 cm (3.5 – 3.9 in) high, 15 – 17 cm (5.9 – 6.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Blunt pyramidal, four-angled.
  • Axil: Woolly.
  • Radial spine: As many as 12, needle-like, white, to 3 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 6, robust, dark yellow, becoming brownish with age, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long, lowermost one longest.
  • Flower: Yellowish green, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Dull pink to greenish.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Durango, San Luis Potosi and Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.750 – 2.400 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 109.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 418.
  • Synonymes:
    M. armatissima

    M. hastifera

    M. ocotillensis

    M. saint-pieana (?)

Mammillaria glassi ssp ascensionis

  • First description by Reppenhagen, Kakt. and Sukk. 30(3): 61-62 (1979)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters. Stems globose, becoming cylindrical, to 10 cm (1.2 – 3.9 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: With short white wool but few bristles.
  • Radial spine: 50 – 60, hairlike, white, interlacing, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 8, 5 – 7 mm long, one erect, straight or hooked, others difficult to distinguish from radials.
  • Flower: Often not opening completely, light pink, to 14 mm (0.6 in) long, 18 – 22 mm (to 0.9 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Green becoming pink, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Altitude 2.400 – 2.750 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 111.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 419
  • Synonymes:
    M. ascensionis

    M. ascensionis var nominis-dulcis

    M. glassii var ascensionis

    M. glassii var nominis-dulcis

    M. glassii var siberiensis

Mammillaria glassii ssp glassii

  • First description by R.A. Foster, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 40(4): 132 (1968)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters. Stems globose, becoming cylindrical, up to 10 cm high, but rarely exceeding 3 cm (1.2 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: With 20 – 30 white bristles to 25 mm (1 in) long or nealy naked.
  • Radial spine: 50 – 60, hairlike, white, interlacing, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, 4 – 7 mm long, erect, straight or hooked, others difficult to distinguish from radials.
  • Flower: Often not opening completely, light pink, to 14 mm (0.6 in) long, 3,5 mm (to 0.9 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Green becoming pink, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -6? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila, Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Altitude 1.450 – 2.250 m.
  • Comments: Readily forms clumps of many small heads. Can tolerate very bright light, and growth and flowering are improved under these conditions. Use very gritty potting mix, and only use the smallest diameter and shortest pot that will accommodate the plant. Careful watering and the use of a covering gravel are good ways to preserve the intensely white spines.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 110.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 418-419.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria glochidiata

  • First description by Martius, Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. 16: 337, plate 23 (1832)

  • Body: Plants irregularly forming clusters. Stems cylindrical, glossy bright green, rounded apically, 2 – 3.5 cm (0.8 – 1.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Flabby, widely separated, cylindrical to conical, 12 – 16 mm (0.5 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Axil: Some with bristles.
  • Radial spine: 9 – 11, threadlike, flexible, smooth, white, horizontal, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, needle-like, lower one hooked, dark yellow to reddish brown, 6 – 12 mm (0.2 – 0.5 in) long.
  • Flower: Bell shaped, white to pink, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and 12 mm (0.5 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, scarlet, to 16 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Brownish black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Mexico. Altitude about 1.300 m.
  • Comments: Easily grown, but needs to be grown hard to keep the clumps compact. Tends to become swollen and untidy in growth habit if given too much water. Easily propagated from the offsets.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 112.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 419.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria goodridgei

  • First description by Scheer in Salm-Dyck, Cact. Hort. Dyck. 1849: 91 (1850)

  • Body: Plants occasionally clustering. Stems globose to short cylindrical, to 8 cm (3.1 in) high, 3 – 4 cm (1.2 – 1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Deep taproots.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tapering cylindrical, obtuse.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 13, chalky white with dark tips, straight, spreading, 4 – 7 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 5, brown, to 6 mm (0.2 in) long, lower one usually hooked.
  • Flower: Funnelform, cream with purplish midveins, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red, to 25 mm (1 in) long.
  • Seed: Black, smooth.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Cedros and Guadalupe Islands, Baja California, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 113.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 419.
  • Synonymes:
    M. goodrichii

    M. goodridgei var rectispina

    M. rectispina

Mammillaria grahamii

  • First description by Engelmann, Proc. Amer. Acad. 3: 262 (1856)

  • Body: Plants solitary or branching basally. Stems globose to short cylindrical, light green, 7 – 20 cm (2.8 – 7.9 in) or more high, 7.5 – 11 cm (3 – 4.3 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Thickened.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Ovoid to cylindrical, often four-angled.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 35, straight, needle-like, white to light brown to reddish, 6 – 12 mm (0.2 – 0.5 in) long, lateral ones longuest.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, yellowish brown to dark brown, 12 – 25 mm (0.5 – 1 in) long, the longest one usually hooked.
  • Flower: Pink to lavender pink to reddish purple, sometimes white, 20 – 45 mm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Bright red, 12 – 25 mm (0.5 – 1 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -10? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas, USA; Sonora, Sinaloa and Chihuahua, Mexico. Altitude 200 – 1.550 m.
  • Comments: Like almost all of the hooked spined species from the Southwest USA and Baja California, this species challenges the grower to keep it alive and flowering. It is especially sensitive to overwatering. A winter rest that allows the plant to shrivel ? perhaps losing up to 25% of its summer height ? will encourage flowering and long time survival. Be careful to encourage slow growth.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 115-116.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 419.
  • Synonymes:
    M. grahamii var arizonica

    M. grahamii var oliviae

    M. microcarpa

    M. microcarpa var grahamii

    M. microcarpa var auricarpa

    M. microcarpa var milleri

    M. milleri

    M. oliviae

Mammillaria grusonii

  • First description by Runge, Gartenflora 38: 105 with fig. (1889)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems globose to thick cylindrical, light green, to 25 cm (9.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Four-angled.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 12 – 14, straight, upper ones shorter, 6 – 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: Usually 2, straight, one ascending, one descending, 4 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Bell shaped, light yellow, to 25 mm (1 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Scarlet.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila and Durango, Mexico. Altitude 800 – 1.850 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 117-118.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 420.
  • Synonymes:
    M. durangicola

    M. mexicensis (?)

    M. pachycylindrica

    M. papasquiarensis

    M. tesopacensis var papasquiarensis

    M. zeyeriana

Mammillaria guelzowiana

  • First description by Wedermann, Zeitschr. Sukkulentenk. 3: 356 (1928)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later clustering, depressed apically. Stems globose, to 7 cm (2.8 in) high, 4 – 10 cm (1.6 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules conical to cylindrical, flabby.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 60 – 80, hairlike, twisted, smooth, white, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 6, slender, needle-like, reddish brown to yellow, 8 – 25 mm (0.3 – 1 in) long, one hooked.
  • Flower: Bell shaped to funnelform, bright, intense purplish red, to 4 cm (1.6 in) long and 7 cm (2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Nearly globose, pale red or yellowish white, to 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -6? C.
  • Habitat Substrate: Grassy mountain tops.
  • Geographic Distribution: Durango, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 1.700 m.
  • Comments: One of the more difficult species to grow long enough to produce clumps. Especially sensitive to over watering; plants should be allowed to become crowded in their pot. High levels of light are needed to flower.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 119.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 420.
  • Synonymes:
    Krainzia guelzowiana

    M. guelzowiana var robustior

    M. guelzowiana var splendens nom.nud.

Mammillaria guerreronis

  • First description by Bravo, An. Inst. Biol. Mex. 3: 395, with figs. (1932)

  • Body: Plants commonly clustering. Stems cylindrical, bright green, becoming gray-green, to 60 cm (24 in) high and 6 cm (2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With watery latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: With short wool and 15 – 20 white bristles.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 30, bristly, white, 5 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 5, usually 4, brown, becoming whitish, to 25 mm (1 in) long, upper ones straight, lowermost one straight or hooked.
  • Flower: Red, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Greenish white, becoming pink.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guerrero, Mexico. Altitude 650 – 900 m.
  • Comments: A species that needs very bright light and a winter rest to encourage flowering. With an abundance of time will produce clusters of columnar stems. Offsets are produced from the lowest portion of the stem, and at irregular intervals further up. Keep in the sunniest location in the greenhouse.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 120.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 420.
  • Synonymes:
    M. guerreronis var recta

    M. guerreronis var subhamata(m)

    M. guerreronis var zapilotensis

    M. zapilotensis

Mammillaria guillauminiana

  • First description by Backberg, Cactus (Paris) 33, suppl. 2: 81 (1952)

  • Body: Plants solitary or forming clumps. Stems globose, pale green, to 5.5 cm (2.2 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots: Taproot.
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 32, bristle-like, white, 6 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 5, brown with darker tips, to 6 mm (0.2 in) long, lowermost one hooked.
  • Flower: White with pink midveins, 8 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Durango and Sinaloa, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 121.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 420.
  • Synonymes:
    M. mercadensis var guillauminiana

Mammillaria haageana ssp acultzingensis

  • First description by Linzen et al, Mitt. Atbeitskr. Mammillarienfr. 18(2): 72-76 (1994)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems globose to slightly elongated, glaucous green, 8 to 10 cm high, less than 10 cm (3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules crowded, small, four-angled basally.
  • Axil: With white wool.
  • Radial spine: 15 – 25, smooth, white to glassy white, pale yellowish brown at base, radiating, bristly, 5 – 9 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, usually 2, slender, straw yellow to yellowish brown, stronger than the radials, straight, needle-like, 7 – 12 mm long.
  • Flower: Bell shaped, deep carmine red, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long, to 22 mm (0.9 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Light brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Acultzingo, Veracruz, Mexico. Altitude 2.000 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 123.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 421.
  • Synonymes:
    M. acultzingensis

Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua

  • First description by J. Purpus, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 22: 163 (1912)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems about 15 cm high, 10 – 11 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules crowded, small, four-angled basally.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 30, smooth, white, radiating, bristly, 3 – 6 mm (to 0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: Prominent, orange brown.
    1 – 4, usually 2, slender, straight to slightly curved, 6 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Deep magenta pink to pale pink, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long, to 15 mm (0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Light brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Rocky places, vertical broken rock faces.
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla, Oaxacana, and Morelos, Mexico. Altitude 600 – 2.600 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 124.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 421.
  • Synonymes:
    M. albidula

    M. conspicua

    M. conspicua var vaupelii

    M. vaupelii

Mammillaria haageana ssp elegans

  • First description by J. Purpus, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 22: 162 (1912)

  • Body: Solitary, seldom branching. Stems globose, 5 – 8 cm (2 – 3.1 in) in diameter, slightly depressed at the apex with little wool.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With wool in youth.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 18, white, slender, needle-like, somewhat curved, longer at the sides, 1 – 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: 2, often only 1, stout needle-like to awl-shaped, straight or a little bent, grey-brown, darker at the tip, 5 – 8 mm long.
  • Flower: Bright rose-red with darker midstripe, 15 – 20 mm long. Stigmas very pale greenish white.
  • Fruit: Carmine.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate: Open grassy areas.
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla, Mexico. Altitude about 2.300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 124.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 421.
  • Synonymes:
    M. collina

    M. elegans (misapplied)

Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana

  • First description by Pfeiffer, Allg. Gartenz. 4:257 (1836)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, sometimes clustering with age. Stems globose, glaucous green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high, 5 – 10 cm (2 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules crowded, small, four-angled basally.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 30, smooth, white, radiating, bristly, 3 – 6 mm (to 0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, usually 2, slender, black to reddish, straight to slightly curved, 6 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Deep magenta pink to pale pink, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long, to 15 mm (0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Light brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla, Mexico, Veracruz, Morelos and Oaxacana, Mexico. Altitude 450 – 2.550 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 122.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 420-421.
  • Synonymes:
    M. elegans var longicaudata

    M. elegans var lupina

    M. donatii

    M. dyckiana

    M. kunthii

Mammillaria haageana ssp san-angelensis

  • First description by Sanchez-Mejoradae, Cact. Suc. Mex. 16(1): 8 (1981)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globose to shortly columnar, 6 – 12 cm high, 4 – 7 cm (1.6 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Woolly in youth.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 20, needle-like, white, 5 – 7 mm long.
  • Central spine: Usually 2, or 1, awl-shaped, white, darker at the tip, 5 – 6 mm long.
  • Flower: Pink to carmine red, 12 – 14 mm long.
  • Fruit:
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Mexico D.F., Mexico. Altitude 2.270 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 125.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 421.
  • Synonymes:
    M. dealbata sensu Br & R

    M. elegans var dealbata sensu Schumann

    M. san-angelensis

Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii

  • First description by Craig, Mamm. Handb. 283 (1945) as M. elegans var. schmollii

  • Body: A smaller stemmed, clustering variant of the species.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil:
  • Radial spine:
  • Central spine: Reddish brown to black spines.
  • Flower:
  • Fruit:
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla and Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 850 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 126.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 421.
  • Synonymes:
    M. elegans var schmollii

    M. haageana var schmollii

    M. meissneri

Mammillaria hahniana ssp bravoae

  • First description by Craig, Mamm. Handb. 112 (1945) – as m. bravoae

  • Body: Plants solitairy or clustering from the base. Stems globose, light green to 6.5 cm high and in diameter. Sunken at the apex.
    Dense white wool covering the top of the plant and white hair-like spines extending beyond the tubercules.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Milky sap.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 and 21
  • Tubercule: Numerous, small, triangular conical.
  • Axil: With 20 or more bristles 35 – 40 mm (1.4 – 1.6 in) long.
  • Radial spine: 28 – 30, needle-like, straight, white, 4 – 7 mm long, interlacing.
  • Central spine: 2, slender, straight, stiff, pinkish brown, darker at tip, 6 – 8 mm long.
  • Flower: Deep pink with darker midstripe, 1 cm long and in diameter. Stigmas pinkish brown.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, carmine red, 5 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Seed: Pale brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Mexico.
  • Comments: A shorter spined variant of the species.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 129.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 421.
  • Synonymes:
    M. bravoae

Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana

  • First description by Werdermann, Monatsschr. Deutsch. Kakt.-Ges. 1: 77 (1929)

  • Body: Plants usually forming clumps. Stems globose, light green to 9 cm (3.5 in) high and 10 cm (3.9 in) in diameter (up to 15 cm or more in cultivation).
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Numerous, small, triangular conical.
  • Axil: With 20 or more bristles 35 – 40 mm (1.4 – 1.6 in) long.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 30, hairlike, white, 5 – 15 mm (0.2 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, white with reddish tips, to 4 mm long.
  • Flower: Purplish red, 12 – 15 mm (0.5 – 0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red, 5 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Tamaulipas and Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 750 – 2.200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 128.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 421.
  • Synonymes:
    M. hahniana var giseliana

    M. hahniana var wedermanniana

Mammillaria hahniana ssp mendeliana

  • First description by Bravo, An. Inst. Biol. Mex. 2: 195 (1931) – as Neomammillaria mendeliana.

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globose to cylindrical 8 – 9 cm wide. A more spiny than hairy plant, although there is plenty of axillary wool at the apex.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With numerous long, bristly white hairs and abundant white wool.
  • Radial spine: Nonexistent, or present as short, white bristly hairs.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, quite long, 15 – 20 mm, the lower longest, straight, stiff, brownish red with nearly black tips, becoming grey.
  • Flower: 1 cm long, inner petals with very pale pink margins, deep pink midstripe, darker at tip. Stigmas yellow.
  • Fruit: Bright purple to carmine, 2 cm long.
  • Seed: Pale brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato and Queretaro, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 129.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 421.
  • Synonymes:
    M. mendeliana

Mammillaria hahniana ssp woodsii

  • First description by Craig, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 15(3): 33 (1943) – as M. woodsii

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globose to club-shaped, with sunken apex, 5 cm high, 8 cm in diameter (in cultivation up to 25 cm or more)
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Milky.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 and 21
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With dense white wool and numerous, white hair-like bristles at the apex.
  • Radial spine: 25 – 30, white, fine, hair-like, tortuous, flexible, 4 – 8 mm long.
  • Central spine: 2, occasionally 4, lower to 16 mm long, slender, awl shaped, the upper 4 – 5 mm needle-like, straight or slightly curved, dull, chalky, purplish pink with black tips.
  • Flower: Funnelform, 10 – 12 mm long, 12 – 15 mm in diameter, pink with darker pink midstripe.
  • Fruit: Deep pink.
  • Seed: Dull brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 130.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 421.
  • Synonymes:
    M. woodsii

Mammillaria halbingeri

  • First description by Boedeker, Kakteenk. 1933: 9 (1933)

  • Body: Plants solitary, later forming clumps. Stems globose to short cylindrical, light green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) high and 8 cm (3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 and 21
  • Tubercule: Tubercules conical to ovoid, glossy, light green.
  • Axil: With wool.
  • Radial spine: 21 – 28, thin, needle-like, glassy white, 5 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2, sometimes one, slightly curved, needle-like, glassy white to yellowish white, with brown tips, to 9 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, sulfur yellow with pale pink margins, to 12 mm (0.5 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Small, whitish.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Meadows, wooded valleys, in humus and moss.
  • Geographic Distribution: near Ocotepec, Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 2.000 to 2.500 m.
  • Comments: The magenta flowered variant has a much wider distribution, from around Ocotepec to the Tlaxiaco junction of highway 190, and further into the Sierra Mixteca.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 131.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 421.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria halei

  • First description by T.S. Brandegee, Proc. Calif. Acad. 2: 161 (1889)

  • Body: Plants forming large clumps to 2 m (6.6 ft) wide. Stems cylindrical, 30 – 50 cm (12 – 20 in) long, 5 – 7.5 cm (2 – 3 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Short.
  • Axil: Woolly.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 21, reddish brown, becoming gray, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 4, reddish-brown, later gray, straight, stiff, stout, to 35 mm (1.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Borne vertically, 2.5 – 5 cm (1 – 2 in) long, floral tubes long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: 0? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Magdalena and Santa Margarita Islands, Baja California Sur, rarely on the adjacent mainland, Mexico. Altitude 10 – 100 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 132.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 166 as Cochemiea halei.
  • Synonymes:
    Cochemiea halei

Mammillaria heidiae

  • First description by Krainz, Kakt. and Sukk. 26(10): 217 (1975)

  • Body: Plants solitary or forming clumps. Stems globose to 3 cm (1.2 in) high and 5.5 cm (2.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Fibrous.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: With one or five thin, white bristles to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 24, straight, bristle-like, flexible, thin, glassy white, to 11 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 0 – 2, hooked or straight, reddish brown, yellow basally, somewhat flexible, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Flower: Yellowish green, to 30 mm (1.2 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Green, becoming brown.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: North of Acatlan, Puebla, Mexico. altitude 1.000 – 1.600 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 133.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 422.
  • Synonymes:
    M. zephyranthoides var heidiae

Mammillaria hernandezii

  • First description by Glass & Foster, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 55(1): 22 (1983)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems depressed globose to globose, rich green, 2.5 – 4.5 cm (1 – 1.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Somewhat fleshy.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Pyramidal.
  • Axil: With short white wool.
  • Radial spine: 17 – 25, radiating, somewhat curved backward, not interlacing, white, 1.2 – 2.2 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Cherry red to pale magenta, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Fruit: Remains embedded in the stem.
  • Seed: Large, black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 2.300 m.
  • Comments: Not too difficult to raise from seed. Clumping in cultivation. Needs gritty substrate and careful watering (not too generous).
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 134.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 422.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria herrerae

  • First description by Wedermann, Motizbl. Bot. Gart. Mus. Berlin 11:276 (1931)

  • Body: Plants solitary or clustering basally. Stems globose, 2 – 3.5 cm (0.8 – 1.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules close set, cylindrical, truncate terminally.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 100 or more, unequal, interlacing, bristly, white or gray, 1 – 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Pink, 20 – 25 mm (0.8 – 1 in) long.
  • Fruit: Globose, whitish, small.
  • Seed: Blackish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): April.
  • Minimum temperature: +5? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 1.920 m.
  • Comments: Flowering from 3cm diameter.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 136.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 422.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria heyderi ssp gaumeri

  • First description by Britton & Rose, Cact. 4: 72 (1923) – as Neomammillaria gaumerii.

  • Body: Plants clustering. Stems globose to short cylindric, green, to 15 cm high, 4 – 12 cm (3.1 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 12, white with brown tips, 5 – 7 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1, usually brown, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Creamy white, 10 – 14 mm long.
  • Fruit: Crimson.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Half-hidden in the sand.
  • Geographic Distribution: Yucatan, Mexico. Altitude just above sea level to 25 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 138.
    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 423.
  • Synonymes:
    M. gaumeri

Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera

  • First description by Engelmann in Wislizenus, Mem. Tour N. Mex. 105 (1848) – as M. gummifera.

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems flattened globose, 8 – 12 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With white wool in youth.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 12, with brownish or blackish tips, the lower stouter and stronger, to 2.5 cm long, recurving slightly.
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, occasionally 4, brown with black tips, stronger than the radials.
  • Flower: Funnelform, brownish red on the outer petals, inner petals reddish white with dark red midstripe, 25 – 30 mm long, 15 – 25 mm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Scarlet.
  • Seed: Dark brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Sonora, Jalisco and Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 2.450 m.
  • Comments: Quite distinctive darker aspect as the other subspecies.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 138.
    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 423.
  • Synonymes:
    M. gummifera

    M. heyderi var gummifera

Mammillaria heyderi ssp hemisphaerica

  • First description by Engelmann, Boston J. Nat. Hist. 6: 198 (1850 – as M. Hemisphaerica.

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globose, 8 – 12 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Nearly naked.
  • Radial spine: 9 – 13, thin, needle-like, the lower stronger, 2 – 8 mm long, brownish or grey, often with black tips.
  • Central spine: 1, brown with black tip, 3 – 4 mm long, or occasionally up to 8 mm.
  • Flower: Cream to dusty pink, 10 – 15 mm long. Stigmas greenish yellow.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Reddish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Texas, USA; Coahuila, Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 139.
    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 423.
  • Synonymes:
    M. hemisphaerica

    M. heyderi var waltheri

    M. waltheri

Mammillaria heyderi ssp heyderi

  • First description by Muehlenpfordt, Allg. Gartenz. 16:20 (1848)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed globose to globose, green, to 5 cm (2 in) high, 8 – 12 cm (3.1 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules elongated pyramidal or conical.
  • Axil: Woolly at first.
  • Radial spine: 15 – 22, bristly, white, 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, erect, dark, horny, 6 – 7.5 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: Cream coloured with greenish or brownish midveins..
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Reddish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -10? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Texas and New Mexico, USA; Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, Durango, Sonora, San Luis Potosi and Veracruz, Mexico. Altitude 10 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments: A low growing plant, M. Heyderi is among the most cold hardy of the Mammillaria. It is among the easiest of Mammillaria to grow, but one must be patient, as increases in size come slowly. In the winter, expect the plant to shrink, perhaps even down to the level of the soil. It has a large root, so using a deeper pot than normal is appreciated as is strong light exposure.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 137.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 422.
  • Synonymes:
    M. applanata

    M. heyderi var applanata

    M. heyderi var bullingtoniana

Mammillaria heyderi ssp macdougalii

  • First description by Rose ex Bailey, Standard Cycl. Hort. 1982 (1916) – as M. macdougalii

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globular, up to 12 – 15 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With long white wool.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 12, white or slightly yellowish, to 2 cm long, the lower stronger, brown or black at the tips.
  • Central spine: 1 or 2, stout, yellowish, brown tipped, to 10 mm long, similar to the radials.
  • Flower: Large, nearly 3 cm long and wide, cream coloured or pale yellow with a faint tan midstripe.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Dark brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Desert grassland.
  • Geographic Distribution: Arizona, USA; Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 850 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 140.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 423.
  • Synonymes:
    M. macdougalii

Mammillaria heyderi ssp meiacantha

  • First description by Engelemann, Proc. Amer. Acad. 3: 263 (1857, preprint 1856) – as M. meiacantha

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flat globular, up to 12 cm or more in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With white wool in youth growth.
  • Radial spine: 5 – 9, thick, needle-like, pale pinkish with brown tips, 6 – 10 mm long, the lower stronger.
  • Central spine: 1, sometimes absent, 3 – 7 mm long, similar to the radials but stronger and darker tipped.
  • Flower: Pink or whitish with pink midstripe, about 2.5 cm long.
  • Fruit: Scarlet.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Grassland and desert grassland.
  • Geographic Distribution: SE Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, USA; Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, San Luis Potosi, Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 1.200 – 1.600 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 141.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 423.
  • Synonymes:
    M. meiacantha

    M. heyderi var meiacantha

    M. parrasensis

Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp huitzilopochtli

  • First description by Hunt, Cact. Succ. J. (GB) 41(4): 106 (1979)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later branching sparsely and randomly. Stems globose at first, becoming club shaped to cylindrical, dark green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high, 6 – 8 cm (2.4 – 3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules compressed laterally, cylindrical to conical.
  • Axil: With dense white wool in the flowering regions.
  • Radial spine: 15 – 30, glassy white, 25 – 35 mm (1 – 1.4 in) long, straight to a little curving.
  • Central spine: 0 – 1, erect, fine, needle- to awl-like, dark brown to black, 4 – 20 mm (to 0.8 in) long.
  • Flower: Not opening widely, carmine, 12 – 15 mm (0.5 – 0.6 in) long, to 7 mm (0.3 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped to cylindrical, red, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long. Often seedless in cultivation.
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: 0? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Puebla, Mexico. Altitude 500 – 2.600 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 142.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 423.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp niduliformis

  • First description by Lau, Mamm. Soc. J. 34(4): 46-49 (1994)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later clustering in untidy clumps. Stems at first globose, later cylindric, 8 cm high, 6 cm in diameter, slightly depressed.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With dense white wool in the flowering area.
  • Radial spine: about 22, glassy whie, brown at base, 1.5 mm long.
  • Central spine: 2 (occasionally up to 4), brown or black, 2 cm long, curving, one up one down, the lower slightly longer, flexible, thicker at the base.
  • Flower: Carmine, 15 mm long, 10 mm wide. Stigmas carmine.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown, very small.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 450 – 500 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 143.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 423.
  • Synonymes:
    M. huitzilopochtli var niduliformis

Mammillaria humboldtii

  • First description by Ehrenberg, Linnaea 14: 378 (1840)

  • Body: Plants solitary to many-stemmed. Stems depressed globose to globose, light green, to 7 cm (2.8 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules cylindrical, rounded above.
  • Axil: With wool and white bristles.
  • Radial spine: up to 80 or more, unequal, white, 4 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Bright purplish pink, to 25 mm (1 in) long and 15 mm (0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, probably red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): April, May.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Mexico. Altitude 1.350 – 1.500 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 144.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 423.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp hutchinsoniana

  • First description by Gates, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 6(1): 4 (1934)

  • Body: Plants solitary to several stemmed. Stems cylindrical, olive green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high, 4 – 6 cm (1.6 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Fibrous.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Short, conical.
  • Axil: With scant wool or naked.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 20, straight, slender, needle-like, purplish, 5 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4, tan with purplish tips, 5 – 8 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long, lowermost one hooked.
  • Flower: Cream, with dark midveins, 25 – 30 mm (1 – 1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, scarlet, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Widespread on the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 145.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 423.
  • Synonymes:
    M. bullardiana

    M. hutchisoniana var bullardiana

Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp louisae

  • First description by Lindsay, Desert Plant Life 11: 166 (1939) – as M. louisae

  • Body: Simple, occasionally branched, 1 – 3.5 cm tall, 1.5 – 3 cm wide.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: About 11, 5 – 7 mm long, light tan, dark tipped.
  • Central spine: 4, brown with darker tips, 8 – 10 mm long, the lowest one longest and hooked.
  • Flower: White or light pink with lavender pink midstripe, outer segments olive to brownish green, about 3.5 – 4 cm in diameter. Long olive-green (more commonly brown) stigmas.
  • Fruit: Red, large and fat.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California, Mexico. (restricted to the coastal region near Socorro).
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 147.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 424.
  • Synonymes:
    M. louisae

Mammillaria insularis

  • First description by Gates, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 10(2): 25 (1938)

  • Body: Plants sometimes solitary but usually forming clusters. Stems flattened globose, blue-green, to 6 cm (2.4 in) high and 5 cm (2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Fleshy.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules truncate conical.
  • Axil: Naked or slightly woolly.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 30, needle-like, white, to 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1, hooked, with black tip, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, light pink, 15 – 25 mm (0.6 – 1 in) long.
  • Fruit: Black.
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): June, Jully, August, September.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California, Mexico.
  • Comments: Flowering from 3 cm diameter. Grow in a gritty potting mix, and disturb the fleshy roots as little as possible when repotting. Expect slow growth, and be careful to keep the soil on the dry side much of the time.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 148.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 424.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana

  • First description by Britton & Rose, Cact. 4: 160 (1923)

  • Body: Plants branching basally and forming clumps. Stems globose to short cylindrical, bright green, 5 – 6 cm (2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Occasionally with latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Tubercules tapered cylindrical, rounded apically.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 40 or more, fine needle-like, straight to slightly twisting, white, to 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 6, reddish brown with dark tips, 7 – 9 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long, lower one hooked.
  • Flower: Delicately fragrant, pink to purplish pink, to 20 mm (0.8 in) in diameter. Stigmas white.
  • Fruit: Bluntly club shaped, white to dull pinkish red, to 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Seed: Brownish black, finely pitted.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Jalisco, Michoacan and Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 1.200 – 2.500 m.
  • Comments: This species appears to be closely related to M. mercadensis. A species that is quite variable in appearance, the only special requirement is that the potting mix be open and freely draining. Does better in strong indirect light, as it is subject to sunburn when exposed to the direct rays of the sun.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 149.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 424.
  • Synonymes:
    M. fuscohamata

    M. kleiniorum

Mammillaria jaliscana ssp zacatecasensis

  • First description by Shurly, Cact. Succ. J. (GB) 22(3): 51 (1960) – as M. zacatenensis

  • Body: Simple, globose, 6 – 7 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 24, yellow, 7 – 8 mm long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 4, the lowest one hooked, pale yellow, pale red in the upper part, 15 mm long and stronger than the radials.
  • Flower: White with pink midstripe, 14 mm in diameter. Stigmas greenish white.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 1.400 – 2.600 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 150.
  • Synonymes:
    M. zacatecanensis

Mammillaria johnstonii

  • First description by Britton & Rose, Cact. 4: 80 (1923)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary but occasionally clustering basally. Stems globose to short cylindrical, dull bluish gray-green, 15 – 20 cm (5.9 – 7.9 in) high.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Tubercules four-angled.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 14, stiff, needle-like, white with brown tips, 6 – 9 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2, rarely 4 – 6, bluish brown, straight, one erect, others diverging, 10 – 25 mm (0.4 – 1 in) long.
  • Flower: White, to pale pink to cream, with pink to brownish midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) in diameter. Stigmas olive-green.
  • Fruit: Globose, swollen, scarlet.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Steep, rocky hills
  • Geographic Distribution: San Carlos Bay, Sonora, Mexico. Altitude up to 50 m.
  • Comments: Fairly slow growing, and average in its cultural requirements. May be more frost tender than most Mammillaria, and flowering benefits from higher average temperatures than most species.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 151.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 424.
  • Synonymes:
    M. johnstonii var guaymensis

    M. johnstonii var sancarlensis

Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp beiselii

  • First description by Diers, Kakt. and. Sukk. 30 (3): 57 (1979) – as M. beiselii

  • Body: Plants solitary, sometimes branching dichotomously or basally. Stems globose to short cylindrical, blue-green to dark green, 7 – 10 cm (2.8 – 3.9 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules firm, pyramidal.
  • Axil: Bristly.
  • Radial spine: 5 – 8, awl-like, straight to slightly curved, reddish, becoming chalky white with age, 4 – 30 mm (1.2 in) long, upper and lower ones longest.
  • Central spine: 1, awl-like, white or yellowish, with dark tip, to 5.5 mm (2.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, white with purplish midveins, to 25 mm (1 in) long and 15 mm (1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Bright red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: 0? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Along the border of Colima and Michoacan, Mexico. Altitude 150 – 200 m
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 153.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 425.
  • Synonymes:
    M. beiselii

    M. voburnensis var gerhardii

Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp collinsii

  • First description by Britton & Rose, Cact. 4: 101 (1923) – as M. collinsii.

  • Body: Plants branching basally. Stems globose to short cylindrical, blue-green to dark green, 5 – 6 cm high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules firm, pyramidal.
  • Axil: Bristly.
  • Radial spine: 7, awl-like, straight to slightly curved, reddish, becoming chalky white with age, 4 – 30 mm (1.2 in) long, upper and lower ones longest.
  • Central spine: 1, awl-like, white or yellowish, with dark tip, to 5.5 mm (2.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, pale yellow, outer segments yellow with reddish midstripe, to 10 – 15 mm long and wide.
  • Fruit: Bright red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tehuntepec, Oaxaca and Chiapas, Mexico. Altitude 10 – 850 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 154.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 425.
  • Synonymes:
    M. collinsii

    M. nagliana

    M. tropica

    M. voburnensis var collinsii

Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp karwinskiana

  • First description by Martius, Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. 16(1): 335 (1832)

  • Body: Plants solitary, sometimes branching dichotomously or basally. Stems globose to short cylindrical, blue-green to dark green, 7 – 10 cm (2.8 – 3.9 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules firm, pyramidal.
  • Axil: Bristly.
  • Radial spine: Usually 6, awl-like, straight to slightly curved, reddish, becoming chalky white with age, 4 – 30 mm (1.2 in) long, upper and lower ones longest.
  • Central spine: Absent
  • Flower: Funnelform, white with purplish midveins, to 25 mm (1 in) long and 15 mm (1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Bright red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Morelos, Michoacan, Puebla, Mexico. Altitude 1.200 – 2.100 m.
  • Comments: This species is commonly found in nurseries and even garden shops. It is easily grown, and over time will produce large clumps. It grows by dichotomously dividing and also by producing offsets. It is average in cold tolerance among Mammillarias, and can survive short exposures to freezing temperatures if properly hardened off and kept dry.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 152.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 425.
  • Synonymes:
    M. confusa

    M. conzattii

    M. ebenacantha

    M. jozef-bergeri

    M. multiseta

    M. neomystax

    M. praelii

    M. strobilina

Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp nejapensis

  • First description by Craig & Dawson, Allan Hancock Found. Occ. Pap. 2: 57 (1948)

  • Body: Plants branching basally or dividing dichotomously. Stems globose to short cylindrical, blue-green to dark green, to 15 cm high and 5 – 7.5 in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules firm, pyramidal.
  • Axil: With much wool and many tortuous bristles.
  • Radial spine: 3 – 5, awl-like, straight to slightly curved, reddish, becoming chalky white with age, the upper shorter, 2 – 5 mm long, the lowermost the longest, to 25 or even 50 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Funnelform, pale cream with red-brown to scarlet midstripe, 18 mm long, 10 mm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Bright red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: NW of Nejapa, Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 850 – 1.650 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 155.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 425.
  • Synonymes:
    M. nejapensis

    M. nejapensis var brevispina

    M. nejapensis var longispina

Mammillaria klissingiana

  • First description by Boedeker, Zeitschr. Sukkulentenk. 3: 123 (1927)

  • Body: Plants solitary to sometimes branching. Stems globose to short cylindrical, rounded apically, to 16 cm (6.3 in) high and 9 cm (3.5 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Firm, rounded pyramidal to conical.
  • Axil: With many white bristles to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 35, spreading, straight, white, to 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, awl-like, white with darker tips, to 2 mm long.
  • Flower: Pink, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and 8 mm (0.3 in) in diameter. Stigmas yellow.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, 5 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate: Along the top edge of vertical limestone cliffs in indirect sun.
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon and San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 870 – 2.300 m.
  • Comments: Forms are available that produce fairly large heads with few offsets, and other forms will produce many smaller offsets. Can withstand full sun when properly acclimatized. Although a fairly slow grower, will produce large clumps given enough time. Best grown in a shallow pot.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 156.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 425.
  • Synonymes:
    M. brauneana

Mammillaria kraehenbuehlii

  • First description by Krainz, Die Kakt. Liefg. 46-47 (1971)

  • Body: Plants forming low dense clusters. Stems globose at first, later cylindrical, soft, 3 – 12 cm (1.2 – 4.7 in) high, to 3.5 cm (1.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules attenuate to conical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 24, very thin, chalky white with brown tips, curving and interlacing, 3 – 8 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, sometimes absent, brown-tipped, 5 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Lilac-carmine, to 18 mm (0.7 in) long.
  • Fruit: Dark carmine.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Exposed, low, limestone slopes, often beneath low shrubs.
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 1.750 – 2.300 m.
  • Comments: Forms medium sized clumps of numerous small heads. Benefits from protective shade from the strongest sunlight to prevent sunburn, but light does need to be fairly bright to encourage flowering. Limestone in the fast draining soil may be best to encourage good growth and flowering.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 157.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 425.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp egregia

  • First description by Backeberg, Die Cact. 5: 3261, t.237 fig. 3025 (1961)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globular, 5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil:
  • Radial spine: about 50 or more, white.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: About 1 cm long and in diameter. Dirty greenish white with reddish brown midstripe. Stigmas greenish white.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua and Durango, Mexico. Altitude 800 – 1.900 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 159.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 425.
  • Synonymes:
    M. egregia

Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp hyalina

  • First description by Glass & Foster, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 42(3): 111, fig. 31 (1970)

  • Body: Plants solitary, flat-globular, 1 to 3 cm high, 2.5 – 6 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 26 – 36, glassy white, brown tipped, 2 – 6 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: 18 – 20 mm long, 16 – 18 mm in diameter, whitish with brownish midstripe on the inner petals, olive-green stripe on the sepals. Stigmas green.
  • Fruit:
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 2.100 – 2.400 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 160.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 426.
  • Synonymes:
    M. wohlschlageri

Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp lasiacantha

  • First description by Engelmann, Proc. Amer. Acad. 3: 261 (1856)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, occasionally clustering. Stems small, globose to ovoid, occasionally short cylindrical, about 4 – 5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 40 – 80, lying close to the body, chalky white, 3 – 5 mm long, pubescent or more commonly smooth.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: White with red midstripe. Actually, they are variable in colour, from white, through pale pink, to purplish pink, to quite olive-greenish-brown. Size varying from 5 mm to about 2 cm in different plants.
  • Fruit: Scarlet.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, USA; Coahuila, Sonora and Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 700 – 1.900 m.
  • Comments: A difficult species that requires limestone in a fast draining soil to encourage proper spine formation. Maximum light (but not direct sunlight) is required to induce flowering. Light levels should be high throughout the year. Slow growing, this species is normally solitary, and will form a column with time.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 158.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 426.
  • Synonymes:
    M. denudata

    M. lasiacantha var denudata

    M. lasiacantha var minor

Mammillaria laui ssp dasyacantha

  • First description by Hubt, Mamm. Postscripts 6: 7 (1997)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters. Stems depressed globose to globose or short oblong, to 6 cm (2.4 in) high and 1 – 3 cm in diameter, densely covered by spines.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical
  • Axil: Nakes or with sparse wool.
  • Radial spine: 35 – 60 or more, in several series, hairlike, sofr and flexible, white, 6 – 9 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: Very numerous, slender, soft and flexible.
  • Flower: Carmine, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and 12 mm (0.5 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Cylindrical to club shaped, white or pale pink, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): Spring.
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 1.400 – 1.700 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 162.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 426.
  • Synonymes:
    M. dasyacantha

    M. laui fa dasyacantha

    M. subducta var dasyacantha

Mammillaria laui ssp laui

  • First description by Hunt, Cact. Succ. J. (GB) 41(4): 100 (1979)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters. Stems depressed globose to globose or short oblong, to 6 cm (2.4 in) high and 4.5 cm (1.8 in) in diameter, densely covered by spines.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical
  • Axil: Nakes or with sparse wool.
  • Radial spine: 35 – 60 or more, in several series, hairlike, stiff, white, 6 – 9 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Carmine, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and 12 mm (0.5 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Cylindrical to club shaped, white or pale pink, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): Spring.
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 1.600 m.
  • Comments: An easily grown species that responds well to average Mammillaria soils and an average watering schedule. Irregular clumps will start forming at an early age, and repotting may need to done at least two year intervals, if not sooner. For the best spine formation, give high levels of indirect light, and be careful with the watering.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 161.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 426.
  • Synonymes:
    M. laui fa laui

Mammillaria laui ssp subducta

  • First description by Hunt, Mamm. Postscripts 6: 7 (1997)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters. Stems depressed globose to globose or short oblong, to 6 cm (2.4 in) high and 4.5 cm (1.8 in) in diameter, densely covered by spines.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical
  • Axil: Nakes or with sparse wool.
  • Radial spine: 35 – 60 or more, in several series, hairlike, stiff, white, 6 – 9 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 12, distinct, somewhat stout, white to yellowish, 7 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Carmine, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and 12 mm (0.5 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Cylindrical to club shaped, white or pale pink, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): Spring.
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude about 800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 163.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 426.
  • Synonymes:
    M. laui fa subducta

    M. subducta

Mammillaria lenta

  • First description by K. Brandegee, Zoe 5: 194 (1904)

  • Body: Plants branching basally to form flat-topped clusters. Stems globose to flattened globose, bright green to yellow green, 3 – 5 cm (1.2 – 2 in) in diameter, 1 – 2 cm (0.4 – 0.8 in) high.
  • Roots: Large, tuberous.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Slender conical, somewhat firm.
  • Axil: With short, persistant wool and some bristles.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 40, dense, fine, white to slightly yellow, 3 – 7 cm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: White with pink or purplish midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and 25 mm (1 in) in diameter. Stigmas bright olive-green.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila, Mexico. Altitude 900 – 1.400 m.
  • Comments: A very slow grower that will produce quite large clumps with age. Some plants will begin to offset when just a few cm across, while others are more reluctant to produce offsets. Offsets may be produced low on the plant, or unusually high near the growing tip. Flowering may be reluctant unless the light levels are high.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 164.
    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus
    Family – page 426.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria limonensis

  • First description by Reppenhagen, Kakt. and. Sukk. 36(3): 44 (1985)

  • Body: Plants usually clustering to make large clumps. Stems ovoid to cylindric, gray-green, 4 – 12 cm (1.6 – 4.7 in) high, 3 – 5 cm (1.2 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Slightly tapered cylindrical, stubby, flattened apically.
  • Axil: With wool and bristly hairs (to 14).
  • Radial spine: 14 – 20, bristle to fine-needle like, white, 4 to 7 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 7, needle-like, the lower longer, thicker, hooked, brown to black, paler below, 7 – 18 mm long.
  • Flower: Pink, about 15 mm long and wide.
  • Fruit: Scarlet.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Jalisco, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 166.
    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 427.
  • Synonymes:
    M. fittkaui ssp limonensis

Mammillaria lindsayi

  • First description by Craig, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 12: 182 (1940)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later forming clumps to 1 m (3.3 ft) wide. Stems globose, gray green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Conical to quadrangular, keeled.
  • Axil: with dense white wool and up to 8 white, twisted bristles.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 14, white with tan to golden yellow bases, 2 – 8 mm (to 0.3 in) long, upper ones shortest.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, straight, golden brown to reddish, 4 – 12 mm (to 0.5 in) long, lowermost longest.
  • Flower: Light greenish yellow with orange-yellow midveins, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long, to 10 mm (0.4 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped to cylindrical, scarlet, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: In partial shade of canyon walls or slopes, in leafmould in cracks in the rocks.
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua and Sinalao, Mexico. Altitude about 2.000 m.
  • Comments: This is one of the species that will form very large clumps with time, but patience is required as it is also a fairly slow grower. A normal cactus potting soil that drains rapidly coupled with careful watering and bright light should induce the yellow flowers to appear.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 167.
    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 427.
  • Synonymes:
    M. lindsay var cobrensis

    M. lindsay var rubriflora

Mammillaria lloydii

  • First description by Britton & Rose, Cact. 4:89 (1923)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globose to cylindrical, dark green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) high, 6 – 15 cm (2.4 – 5.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Closely set, firm, four-angled.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly.
  • Radial spine: 3 – 4, ascending, glabrous, upper ones red to brown, lower ones white, 2 – 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: White with red midveins, 12 – 15 mm (0.5 – 0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, dark red, to 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Zacatecas and San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 1.900 – above 2.450 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 168.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 427.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria longiflora ssp longiflora

  • First description by Britton & Rose, Cact. 4: 163 (1923)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, occasionally clustering. Stems globose to short cylindrical, dark green, 8 – 9 cm (3.1 – 3.5 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: About 30, pale yellow to white, 10 – 13 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4, reddish brown to yellowish whie, one hooked and to 30 mm (1.2 in) long, others 10 – 13 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) long.
  • Flower: Bell shaped to funnelform, pale to deep purplish pink to rose pink, 25 – 40 mm (1 – 1.6 in) long, 20 – 30 mm (0.8 – 1.2 in) in diameter; ovary sunken in stem.
  • Fruit: Small, remaining sunken in the stem.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): March, April.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua and Durango, Mexico. Altitude 2.200 – 2.400 m.
  • Comments: A difficult and often short-lived species. Must have very well draining potting soil. Somewhat frost tolerant. Longiflora ssp Longiflora normally stays as a single short column, while Longiflora ssp Stampferi will form small clusters. Keep in a smaller pot than normal.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 169.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 427.
  • Synonymes:
    Krainzia longiflora

Mammillaria longiflora ssp stampferi

  • First description by Reppenhagen, Kakt. and. Sukk. 30(8): 185 (1979)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, occasionally clustering. Stems globose to short cylindrical, dark green, 2 – 4 cm high, 2.5 – 6 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 30, thin, bristle-like, white.
  • Central spine: 3 (to 4), sometimes absent, needle-like, 10 – 12 mm long, brown, the lower longer and always hooked.
  • Flower: 25 – 30 mm long (shorter than the type), 18 – 35 mm in diameter, rose-pink.
  • Fruit: Small, remaining sunken in the stem.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): March, April.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua and Durango, Mexico. Altitude 2.600 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 170.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 427.
  • Synonymes:
    M. stampferi

    M. longiflora fa stampferi

    M. longiflora fa/var breviflora Hort

Mammillaria longimamma

  • First description by De Candolle (1828)

  • Body: globular, clustering very young, 10 cm tall and wide.
  • Roots: taproot.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: very long and flabby.
  • Axil: sparsely wooly.
  • Radial spine: about 8 to 10 for 12 to 20 mm long with a white to brown colour.
  • Central spine: Usually 1 central spine, to 25 mm long.
    No Central spine for the var. uberiformis.
  • Flower: Lemon yellow, very large for this genus, 4 to 6 cm wide, stigmas yellow
  • Fruit: yellowish to green.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): May
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: MEXICO from states of HIDALGO and QUERETARO between 1000 and 2200m altitude.
  • Comments: In culture, mineral substrate. An easy species that will form large clumps with age, and dependably flowers given proper soil, watering and fertilizing during the growing season. Fertilizer should be ? strength and applied one time each month during the active growing season; this will encourage steady growth, and prevent the large tubercles from becoming flabby.
  • Bibliography:
    Britton & Rose (1923) – the Cactaceae Vol 4 – Page 62

    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – Page 171
  • Synonymes:
    Dolichothele longimamma

    Dolichothele longimamma ssp uberiformis

    Dolichothele uberiformis

    M. longimamma var uberiformis

    M. uberiformis

Mammillaria luethyi

  • First description by George S. Hinton, Phytologia (1996)

  • Body: stems single or branched with up to 7 heads, apex rounded to flattened. 1.5 to 2 cm diameter.
  • Roots: taproot
  • Sap: aqueous.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: slender cylindric, 5.5mm long for 1.3mm large.
  • Axil: naked.
  • Radial spine: more than 80, 0.4 to 0.6 mm long, forming a dense cluster of 1.3 to 1.8mm.
  • Central spine: none.
  • Flower: Up to 3cm long and wide, light magenta coloured at the top and white at the base
  • Fruit: globular, 4.5mm in diameter, nearly completely sunken in the stem, yellowish green to reddish green.
  • Seed: globular, 1 mm x 1 mm, testa black and finely pitted
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): April
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: limestone slabs.
  • Geographic Distribution: MEXICO in the state of COAHUILA in the Sierra Paila.
  • Comments: In culture, mineral substrate. Normally found as a grafted plant, but growers are reporting that it is easily grown on its own roots. Grafted plants are prone to more rapid growth, and therefore are sometimes not as tightly spined as they should be. Bright light will encourage the very dark green color that is possible with this plant, while dimmer light will produce plants of a much lighter green.
  • Bibliography:
    Hunt (1997) – Mammillaria postscript

    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – Page 172 – 173.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria magallanii

  • First description by Schmoll ex. Craig, Mamm. Handbook 225 (1945)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems globose to club shaped, green, to 6 cm (2.4 in) high and 4.5 cm (1.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Tubercules cylindrical.
  • Axil: With scant wool.
  • Radial spine: 70 – 75, interlacing, chalky white with orange-tan base, 2 – 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: Usually absent, sometimes one, straight, curved or hooked, orange-tan with brown tips, to 3 mm long.
  • Flower: Cream coloured with pink to brownish midveins, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila and Durango, Mexico. Altitude 1.110 to 1.900 m.
  • Comments: A very slow growing species that requires the brightest light possible. Watering should be very sparing, and the soil must be fast draining, as roots are easily lost in pots that stay damp for any length of time.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 174.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 428.
  • Synonymes:
    M. lasiacantha ssp magallanii

    M. lengdoleriana (?)

    M. neobertrandiana

    M. roseocentra (?)

Mammillaria magnifica

  • First description by Buchenau, Cact. Suc. Mex. 12(1): 3 (1967)

  • Body: Plants forming clumps. Stems cylindrical, to 40 cm (16 in) high, 7 – 9 cm (2.8 – 3.5 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules pyramidal or conical.
  • Axil: With white wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 24, straight, glassy white or yellowish, 3 – 8 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 5, sometimes up to 8, lowermost one hooked and up to 55 mm (2.2 in) long, others shorter, strong, needle-like, yellowish brown to brown.
  • Flower: Purplish red, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long, 11 – 12 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, pink with green tips, 5 – 22 mm (0.2 – 0.9 in long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla and Morelos, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 1.550 m.
  • Comments: A fairly fast grower that will produce wonderful clumps of very heavily spined plants. Offsets are produced freely, and are distributed somewhat randomly. Since the plant can make wide spreading mounds, shallow pots of large diameter will be required as the plant ages.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 175.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 428.
  • Synonymes:
    M. magnifica var minor

Mammillaria magnimamma

  • First description by Haworth, Phil. Mag. 63: 41 (1824)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later branching basally to form large clumps barely rising above ground level. Stems flattened globose to globose, gray-green to dark blue-green, 10 – 12 cm (3.9 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Firm, four-sided but not sharply angled.
  • Axil: With dense white wool, especially when young.
  • Radial spine: 2 – 5, sometimes more, extremely variable, unequal, awl shaped, whitish to yellowish, with dark tips, 15 – 45 mm (0.6 – 1.8 in) long, lower one curving downwards.
  • Central spine: Usually absent.
  • Flower: Dirty cream coloured with reddish midveins, to deep purplish pink, 20 – 25 mm (0.8- 1 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, dark purplish red, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Widespread throughout central Mexico in Hidalgo, Guerrero, Mexico, Aguascalientes, Zacatecas, Queretaro, Guanajuato, Tapaulimas, Nuevo Leon and San Luis Potosi. Altitude 100 – 2.700 m.
  • Comments: One of the least demanding members of the genus. A wide range of growing conditions is tolerated, but to produce the best plants, growth should be encouraged with regular applications of fertilizer at half strength. Some forms of this species will form numerous fairly small heads, while other forms have larger and fewer heads in a clump.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 176.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 428.
  • Synonymes:
    M. bucareliensis

    M. bucareliensis var multiflora

    M. bucareliensis var tamaulipa

    M. centricirrha

    M. macracantha

    M. priessnitzii

    M. rioverdense

    M. saxicola


    M. seitziana sensu Reppenhagen

    M. seitziana var tolantongensis

    M. vagaspina

    M. vallensis

    M. vallensis var brevispina

    M. zuccariniana

Mammillaria mainiae

  • First description by K. Brandegee, Zoe 5: 31 (1900)

  • Body: Plants solitary to branching freely basally. Stems globose to ovoid, bright green, sometimes reddish in axils, 6 – 7 cm (2.4 – 2.8 in) high, 10 – 12 cm (3.9 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Tubercules cylindrical, becoming conical, somewhat incurved.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 8 – 15, yellow becoming white, with dark tips, slender, needle-like, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, hooked, stout, brown or yellow, with dark tips, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Pinkish white with proeminent purplish pink midveins, 10 – 20 mm (0.4 – 0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Small, globose to ovoid, bright red, remaining beneath the spines.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Arizona, USA and Sonora, Sinaloa, Mexico. Altitude 60 – 550 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 179.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 429.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria mammillaris

  • First description by Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 466 (1753) as Cactus mammillaris.

  • Body: Plants solitary or forming clumps. Stems globose to short cylindrical, light to dark green, shiny, to 20 cm (7.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Tubercules conical.
  • Axil: With scant wool.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 16, reddish brown, becoming gray with age, 5 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 5, reddish brown, with dark tips, later gray, 7 – 8 mm (0.3 in) long, uppermost longest.
  • Flower: Funnelform, creamy white, 10 – 12 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red, 10 – 20 mm (0.4 – 0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Small, brown, rough.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: 8? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Lesser Antilles, Trinidad, Tobago, Cura?ao and neighboring islands of the Netherlands Antilles, and Venezuela. Altitude up to 1.500 m.
  • Comments: Fairly slow growing. Seems to appreciate somewhat weaker light than most mams, and it will take on a reddish color in bright light. Said to be one of the least cold tolerant members of the genus.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 180.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 429.
  • Synonymes:
    M. ekmanii (?)

    M. pseudosimplex

    M. simplex

Mammillaria marcosii

  • First description by Fitz Maurice & Glass, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 69(1): 10-14 (1997)

  • Body: Plants forming irregular clumps. Stems globose to short cylindrical, to 5 cm (2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Soft, cylindrical, with round tips.
  • Axil: With wool and up to 15 crinkly bristles to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 25, radiating, needle-like, straight, white, 4 – 12 mm (to 0.5 in) long.
  • Central spine: 7 – 14, mostly radiating, ascending, needle-like, white to yellow to reddish brown to brown, 10 – 20 mm (0.4 – 0.8 in) long, one descending and variably hooked, all other straight.
  • Flower: Yellowish white with pinkish tint, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and 10 mm ( 0.4 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Obovate to cylindrical, red, 6 – 13 mm (0.2 – 0.5 in) long, not rising above the spines.
  • Seed: Brownish black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Volcanic rock.
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Mexico. Altitude 1.400 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 181.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 429.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria marksiana

  • First description by Krainz, Sukkulentenk. 2: 21 (1948)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later forming clumps. Stems flattened globose, light or yellowish green, 6 – 15 cm (2.4 – 5.9 in) high, 5 – 12 cm (2 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules pyramidal, weakly four-sided.
  • Axil: Woolly, sometimes densely so in the flowering zones.
  • Radial spine:
  • Central spine: Difficult to distinguish as centrals and radials, variable in number, 4 – 21, thin, needle-like, golden yellow to brown, 5 – 8 mm 0.2 – 0.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Bright greenish yellow, 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, dark purplish red, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Small, brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Durango and Sinaloa, Mexico. Altitude 400 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments: An easy species, but not a fast grower. May tend to have the normally light green body become yellowish in bright light. Given enough time will form moderately large sized clumps. An average soil mix is acceptable, as there are no special cultural requirements.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 182.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 430.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria mathildae

  • First description by Kraehenbuehl & Krainz, Kakt. and. Sukk. 24(12): 265 (1973)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters. Stems globose to flattened globose, 5 – 6 cm (2 – 2.4 in) high, to 5 cm (2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Fibrous.
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical or elongated rhomboid.
  • Axil: Some with bristles.
  • Radial spine: 9 – 11, hairlike, white, slightly pubescent, 5 – 14 mm (0.2 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 5, slightly pubescent, reddish brown, 6 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long, one hooked, others straight.
  • Flower: Pinkish white, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Fruit: Scarlet, 6 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Seed: Brownish black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.900 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 183.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 430.
  • Synonymes:
    M. fittkaui ssp mathildae

Mammillaria matudae

  • First description by Bravo, Cact. Succ. J. (GB) 18(4): 83, 96 (1956)

  • Body: Plants solitary to clustering basally. Stems elongated cylindrical, 10 – 20 cm (3.9 – 7.9 in) or more high, to 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 20, translucent white with yellowish base, 2 – 3 mm long, lower ones longest.
  • Central spine: 1, pointing upward, white, becoming brownish with age, needle-like, slightly flattened, to 5 mm long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, light reddish purple, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Fruit: Red with greenish tint, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Seed: Light brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Mexico, Mexico. Altitude 700 – 1.250 m.
  • Comments: This columnar species is quite tidy in youth, but as it elongates it reclines. The grower should plan to allow for the sprawling habit of this plant. Additionally, it is important to keep growth as uniform as possible, as the long cylindrical body will readily show variations in growing conditions. Otherwise, there are no special demands by this easily grown species.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 184.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 430.
  • Synonymes:
    M. compacticaulis

    M. matudae var serpentiformis

    M. matudae var serpentiformis fa duocentralis

Mammillaria mazatlanensis ssp mazatlanensis

  • First description by Schumann ex Guerke, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 15: 154 (1905)

  • Body: Plants commonly forming clumps. Stems cylindrical, 12 – 15 cm (4.7 – 5.9 in) high, 4 – 5 cm (1.6 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules short, conical.
  • Axil: Naked or with one or two short bristles.
  • Radial spine: 12 – 18, slender, white, needle-like, 5 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 3, usually straight but sometimes hooked, reddish brown, upper ones in the same plane as the radials, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Tubular, pink to carmine red to reddish purple, 30 – 40 mm (1.2 – 1.6 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, brown, becoming reddish yellow, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Black
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Colima, Sinaloa, Sonora, Jalisco, Michoacan and Nayarit, Mexico. Altitude from sea level to 500 m.
  • Comments: A variable species that can form large clumps in cultivation, Repotting can present special problems, as the hooked spines can cause the offsets to readily detach from the plant and attach to anything in the near vicinity. Otherwise, an easily grown species that flowers freely.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 185.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 430.
  • Synonymes:
    M. littoralis

    M. mazatlanensis var monocentra

    M. occidentalis

    M. occidentalis var monocentra

    M. occidentalis var sinalensis

    M. patonii var sinalensis

    M. sinaloensis

Mammillaria mazatlanensis ssp patonii

  • First description by Bravo, An. Inst. Biol. Mex. 2: 129 (1931)

  • Body: Plants commonly forming clumps. Stems cylindrical, 12 – 15 cm (4.7 – 5.9 in) high, 4 – 5 cm (1.6 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules short, conical.
  • Axil: Naked or with one or two short bristles.
  • Radial spine: 13 – 15, slender, white, needle-like, 5 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4, stronger than the radials, one slightly hooked, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Tubular, purple, 30 – 40 mm (1.2 – 1.6 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, brown, becoming reddish yellow, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Black
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: 0? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tres Marias Islands off the coast of Nayarit.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 184.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 430.
  • Synonymes:
    M. patonii

Mammillaria melaleuca

  • First description by Karwinski ex Salm-Dyck, Cact. Hort. Dyck, 109 (1850)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, sometimes clustering with age. Stems globose, dark green, 6 – 7 cm (2.4 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Thick, ovate obtuse, robust.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 8 – 9, radiating, nearly straight, upper 4 a little longer, brown, lower ones white.
  • Central spine: Usually one, purplish brown, slender, rigid.
  • Flower: Yellow, to 30 mm (1.2 in) long.
  • Fruit: Greenish to brownish.
  • Seed: Blackish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments: This species benefits from a more open potting mix than its near relatives such as Decipiens. Fairly slow growing, but will produce clumps in several years. Stays neat in appearance as it offsets, with none of the irregularities associated with some other members of the Subgenus Dolichothele.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 187.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 431.
  • Synonymes:
    Dolichothele melaleuca

Mammillaria melanocentra ssp linaresensis

  • First description by R & F Wolf, Kakt. and. Sukk. 41(11): 262-4 (1990)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed globose, glaucous green, to 16 cm (6.3 in) high, 10 – 12 cm (3.9 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Firm, large, pyramidal, strongly four-angled, keeled.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 4 – 6, stout, unequal, white , 6 – 22 mm (0.2 – 0.9 in) long, lowermost longest.
  • Central spine: 1, stout, awl shaped, black, usually ascending, to 25 mm (1in) or more long.
  • Flower: Whitish, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, pink to scarlet, to 30 mm (1.2 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Steep cliffs.
  • Geographic Distribution: Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 189.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 431.
  • Synonymes:
    M. linarensis

Mammillaria melanocentra ssp melanocentra

  • First description by Poselger, Allg. Gartenz. 23: 17 (1855)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed globose, glaucous green, to 16 cm (6.3 in) high, 10 – 12 cm (3.9 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Firm, large, pyramidal, strongly four-angled, keeled.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 7 – 9, stout, unequal, black to gray, 6 – 22 mm (0.2 – 0.9 in) long, lowermost longest.
  • Central spine: 1, stout, awl shaped, black, usually ascending, to 25 mm (1in) or more long.
  • Flower: Bright deep pink, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, pink to scarlet, to 30 mm (1.2 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -6? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila, Durango and Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Altitude 350 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments: One of the large tuberculed species that also has large flowers. Remains solitary, but forms a quite large plant of 20 cm diameter in a few years. Easily grown with no special requirements other than typical Mammillaria culture.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 188.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 431.
  • Synonymes:
    M. euthele

    M. melanocentra var runyonii

    M. runyonii

Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis

  • First description by Reppenhagen & Lau, Kakt. and. Sukk. 30(4): 83 (1979)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed globose, glaucous green, to 16 cm (6.3 in) high, 10 – 12 cm (3.9 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Firm, large, pyramidal, strongly four-angled, keeled.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 11 – 13, stout, unequal, yellowish brown, 6 – 22 mm (0.2 – 0.9 in) long, lowermost longest.
  • Central spine: 1, stout, awl shaped, black, usually ascending, to 25 mm (1in) or more long.
  • Flower: Bright camine, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, pink to scarlet, to 30 mm (1.2 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 600 – 2.550 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 190.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 431.
  • Synonymes:
    M. rubrograndis

Mammillaria mercadensis

  • First description by Patoni, Bol. Alianza Cient. Univ. Durango 1: 54 (1910)

  • Body: Plants solitary and clustering. Stems flattened globose to globose, olive green to dark green, to 8 cm (3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Latex often present at flowering time.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Tubercules conical to short cylindrical.
  • Axil: Without bristles, sparsely woolly.
  • Radial spine: 13 – 35, white to yellow, variably finely pubescent, 6 – 9 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 7, awl shaped, yellow to deep red to reddish brown, with lighter bases, to 14 mm (0.6 in) long, with one, occasionally two hooked.
  • Flower: Variable, bell shaped, more deep set, very pale magenta to magenta, 10 – 20 mm (0.4 – 0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Usually club shaped, reddish green.
  • Seed: Brownish black, finely pitted.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Durango, Jalisco, Guanajuato and Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude about 2.000 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 191.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 431.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria meyranii

  • First description by Bravo, Cact. Cact. Succ. J. (GB) 18(4): 84 (1956)

  • Body: Plants commonly forming clumps basally. Stems cylindrical, to 55 cm (22 in) high, 4 – 5 cm (1.6 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With dilute latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Tubercules conical and slightly four-angled basally.
  • Axil: Sparsely woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 17 – 19, straight, brown with lighter tips, later gray, 3 – 6 mm (to 0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2, pointing upwards and downwards, needle-like, straight, brown with yellow tips, later gray, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Narrowly funnelform, purple, to 18 mm (0.7 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, light purplish pink with greenish tint, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Michoacan and Mexico, Mexico. Altitude 1.400 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments: An easily grown species that will form clusters of tall cylindrical stems. In time, as the stems become too long, they may become horizontal, and then new offsets will form along much of the length of the old stem, in much the same manner as M. spinosissima ssp Pilcayensis and M. guerreronis. Fairly easy species with no special demands in cultivation.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 192.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 432.
  • Synonymes:
    M. meyranii var michoacana

Mammillaria microhelia

  • First description by Werdermann, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt.-Ges. 2: 236 (1930)

  • Body: Plants sometimes solitary but usually forming clumps. Stems cylindrical, medium green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) or more high, 3 – 5 cm (1.2 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Tubercules blunt conical, rounded apically, keeled.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 50, radiating, straight or slightly curved backward, white to yellowish, 4 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, sometimes absent, occasionally up to 8, stout, needle-like, straight or curved, reddish brown to yellowish brown, to 11 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Whitish cream to reddish pink to purple, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: White, pale green, or pale pink.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 2.000 – 2.600 m.
  • Comments: A species that forms short columns and which offsets. Often the offsets are produced in a very regular fashion as a ring up from the base of the original stem, so that the end result is a plant with remarkable symmetry. One of the easier species to grow, it is often recommended for the novice Mammillaria enthusiast.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 193.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 432.
  • Synonymes:
    M. droegeana sensu Reppenhagen

    M. microheliopsis

Mammillaria miegiana

  • First description by Earle Saguaroland Bull. 26: 77 (1972)

  • Body: Plants solitary, appearing white. Stems globose to short cylindrical, to 16 cm (6.3 in) high and 10 cm (3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Four-anged
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 11, grayish white, straight or slightly curved, 8 – 9 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2, upper ascending, lower erect, brown, 7 – 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: Reddish pink with scarlet midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and 25 mm (1 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, cherry red, to 25 mm (1 in) long.
  • Seed: Reddish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 500 – 1.300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 194.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 432.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria mieheana

  • First description by Tiegel in Moeller’s Deutsche Gartenz. 48: 397 (1933)

  • Body: Plants strongly clustering. Stems cylindrical, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high and 5 cm (2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Short ovoid.
  • Axil: With white wool, at least at the apex.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 20, pale yellow to white, 8 – 15 mm (0.3 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 6, nearly straight, yellow to brown, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Yellow to white, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped or ovate, whitish, translucent, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Golden brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 195.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 433.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria moelleriana

  • First description by Boedeker, Zeitschr. Sukkulentenk. 1: 213 (1924)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globose to short cylindrical, glossy green, to 11 cm (4.3 in) high and 10 cm (3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Firm, cylindrical to ovoid.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 35 – 50, white with yellow bases, needle-like, 7 – 9 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 8 – 10, honey yellow to dark reddish brown, with yellow bases, 20 – 30 mm (0.8 – 1.2 in) long, lower 2 – 4 hooked, upper ones shorter and straight.
  • Flower: White to yellow with pinkish midveins to clear pink with darker midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, greenish white, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Durango and Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 2.250 – 2.600 m.
  • Comments: One of the fiercest spined species, it is also one of the more difficult to grow, as it is subject to losing its roots. Extreme care with watering, and a very loose and open potting soil are required for success. Strong filtered light will encourage the formation of heavy spination.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 196.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 433.
  • Synonymes:
    M. cowperae

Mammillaria morganiana

  • First description by Tiegel in Moeller’s Deutsche Gartenz. 48: 397 (1933)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later branching dichotomously and forming clumps. Stems globose to short cylindrical, depressed apically, bright bleu green, to 8 cm (3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Pyramidal.
  • Axil: With fine hairs to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Radial spine: 40 – 50, white, fine, needle- to hairlike, twisting and interlacing, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 5, straight, needle-like, white with brown tips, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Cream to pink, with deep pink midveins, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.380 – 1.700 m.
  • Comments: A slow growing species that will take many years to form a good sized clump. Other than a recognition of the subsequent low demands for fertilizer and water, the grower has no special conditions to meet except for bright light.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 197.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 433.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria muehlenpfordtii

  • First description by Foerster, Allg. Gartenz. 15: 49 (1847)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, sometimes branching dichotomously. Stems globose, massive, blue-green to gray-green, 12 – 15 cm (4.7 – 5.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: With white bristles.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 50, glassy white or yellowish, bristle like, radiating, nearly covering the body, to 4 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4, rarely 2 – 6, pointing outward, brownish yellow, becoming gray with brown tips, extremely variable in lenght, 2 – 40 mm (to 1.6 in) lowermost longest.
  • Flower: Carmine red, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, Guanajuato and San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 1.700 – 2.400 m.
  • Comments: A rapid grower in comparison to other spherical species, the plant will increase the number of heads by dichotomous division. Large clumps can be produced in a few years. No special cultural requirements.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 198.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 433.
  • Synonymes:
    M. celsiana (?)

    M. neopotosina

Mammillaria multidigitata

  • First description by Lindsay, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 19(10): 152 (1947)

  • Body: Plants freely clustering to form large clumps of more than 100 stems. Stems cylindrical, green, 5 – 20 cm (2 – 7.9 in) high, 2 – 5 cm (0.8 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Obtuse.
  • Axil: With some wool.
  • Radial spine: 15 – 25, spreading, white, 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: Usually 4, straight, sometimes one hooked, needle-like, white with brown tips, to 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: White to cream, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Steep slopes.
  • Geographic Distribution: San Pedro Nolasco Island, Gulf of California, Mexico. Altitude sea level to 200 m.
  • Comments: This species forms clumps of short cylindrical stems. Full sun and an open potting mix will ensure that the plant stays appropriately short and sturdy even as a wide clump is produced.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 199.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 433.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria mystax

  • First description by Martius, Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. 16(1): 332 (1832)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globose to cylindrical, dark gray-green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high, 7 – 10 cm (2.8 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Firm, pyramidal, four- to six-angled, keeled.
  • Axil: With bristles.
  • Radial spine: 3 – 10, spreading, white, 4 – 8 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 4, sometimes 1, variable in number and colour, stout, twisted, interwoven, purplish with dark brown tips, one or more centrally placed and to 70 mm (2.8 in) long, others 20 – 70 mm (0.8 – 2.8 in) long
  • Flower: Rose purple with brownish midveins, to 25 mm (1 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red, 20 – 25 mm (0.8 – 1 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Widespread in central Mexico, centering in Puebla and adjacent states. Altitude 1.000 – 2.600 m.
  • Comments: This species will form large spheres, cylinders and with age can offset to form loose clumps. Easily grown with no special requirements.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 200.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 433.
  • Synonymes:
    M. atroflorens

    M. casoi

    M. crispiseta

    M. erythra

    M. huajuapensis

    M. mixtecensis

    M. multiseta sensu Reppenhagen

Mammillaria nana ssp duwei

  • First description by Rogozinski & P.J. Braun, Kakt. and. Sukk. 36(8): 158-164 (1985)

  • Body: Plants solitary, rarely clustering. Stems to 3.5 cm in diameter, 2 – 4 cm high, flat-globose.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Woolly with a little hair.
  • Radial spine: 28 – 36, white, brownish at base, pubescent, 3.5 – 4 mm long.
  • Central spine: Varying from none to 1, 2 or occasionally 4, yellow, hooked, to 8 mm long, pubescent.
  • Flower: Light yellow, about 20 mm long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Light red to red.
  • Seed: Blackish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.800 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments: According to Anderson’s classification, this species is considered as a synonym of M. crinita.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 203.
  • Synonymes:
    M. duwei

Mammillaria nana ssp nana

  • First description by Backeberg, descr. Cact. Nov. 3: 8 (1963)

  • Body: Plants solitary or clustering, 1.5 to 4 cm high, 2.5 to 4 cm wide.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Sparsely woolly, with bristles to 15 mm.
  • Radial spine: 25 – 35, about 7 mm long, thin, white, pubescent.
  • Central spine: At first none, later developing 1 or 2, tawny brown, pubescent, the lower hooked, 7 – 9 mm long, the upper erect, to 4 mm.
  • Flower: Pale cream, pale yellow or white with pinkish brown midstripe, 10 – 20 mm long, 10 – 15 mm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brownish black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Guanajuaro, Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.600 – 2.300 m.
  • Comments: In Anderson’s classification, this species is considered as synonym of M. crinita.
    An easy species that will readily form clumps of small heads. Flowers readily, and for a long period during the early summer. The only cultivation requirement of note is that watering should be done carefully, as the species is a bit prone to root rot.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 202.
  • Synonymes:
    M. monancistracantha

    M. trichacantha

Mammillaria napina

  • First description by J.A. Purpus, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 22: 161 (1912)

  • Body: Plants solitary, rarely clustering, low growing. Stems semiglobose to globose, to 5 cm (2 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots: Tuberous.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Somewhat woolly or naked.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 12, slightly curved, glassy white with yellow bases, 8 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: Usually absent, rarely one.
  • Flower: Bell shaped, pale carmine or pink, with distinctive whitish throats, to 40 mm (1.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Embedded in the plant body, colourless.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla, Mexico. Altitude 1.700 – 2.350 m.
  • Comments: One of the miniatures with large flowers, and like many such species, offers a challenge to the grower. A pot a little larger than average for the size of the plant should be used, and the potting soil must be very free draining, with no tendency to retain water.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 204.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 434.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria nazasensis

  • First description by Glass & Foster, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 47(2): 94(1975)

  • Body: Plants solitary (clustering readily in cultivation), globose, to 2.5 – 3.5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 19 (to 22), fine, white and very pubescent.
  • Central spine: 4, of which 1 is strongly hooked, strongly pubescent, pale whitish yellow to lemon yellow to orange tan.
  • Flower: Pale cream yellow with faint pinkish tan midstripe, 15 mm long and in diameter, stigmas pale greenish yellow to cream-white.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: On steep rocks in crevices.
  • Geographic Distribution: Durango, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 1.700 m.
  • Comments: According to Anderson’s classification, this species is considered as a synonym of M. mercadensis.
    Cultural requirements are much the same as for other miniature hooked spined species, except that this species needs even more care with watering than usual. This is especially important given the pubescent spines which tend to retain water, and the low growing nature of the plant, which keeps it in contact with the soil. A layer of sharp gravel will aid in keeping the plant body dry. If possible avoid overhead watering.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 205.
  • Synonymes:
    M. pennispinosa ssp / var nazasensis

Mammillaria neopalmeri

  • First description by Craig, Mamm. Handb. 267 (1945)

  • Body: Plants usually forming clusters. Stems elongated globose, gray-green, to 9 cm (3.5 in) high and 5 cm (2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Tubercules blunt conical, four-sided basally.
  • Axil: With white wool and short twisted bristles.
  • Radial spine: 25 – 30, slender, needle-like, white, 5 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 5, straight or occasionally hooked, brownish with dark tips, 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: Pale greenish white to light green, sometimes with pinkish tint, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, scarlet, to 13 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Benito and Guadalupe Islands, Baja California, Mexico. Altitude sea level to 300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 206.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 434.
  • Synonymes:
    M. dioica var insularis

Mammillaria nivosa

  • First description by Link ex Pfeiffer, Enum. Cact. 11 (1837)

  • Body: Plants solitary or clustering. Stems globose to short cylindrical, dark green to bronze, 8 – 10 cm (3.1 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13, 11 – 17 and 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Obtusely conical, laterally compressed.
  • Axil: Densely woolly.
  • Radial spine: 6 – 13, bright yellow to dark brown, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Central spine: Usually 1, similar to radials.
  • Flower: Yellow, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long and in diameter. Stigmas yellow.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: +5? / +10? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Carribean.
  • Comments: A striking species that will make large clumps given the best conditions. Tends to bronze in strong light, which encourages flowering and heavy wool and spine production. Reputedly sensitive to low temperatures, but less so if kept on the dry side prior to and during cold weather.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 207.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 434.
  • Synonymes:
    M. flavescens misapplied

    M. flavescens var nivosa

Mammillaria nunezii ssp bella

  • First description by Backeberg, Beitr. Sukkulentenk. 1941: 5 (1941)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, occasionally forming offsets. Stems globose to cylindrical, gray-green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high, 6 – 9 cm (2.4 – 3.5 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical to bluntly four-angled.
  • Axil: With bristles.
  • Radial spine: up to 20 , stiff, slender, white, 5 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 6, straight or occasionally hooked, white with reddish tips, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, carmine, to 15 mm (0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, greenish white tinged with pink, to 25 mm (1 in) long
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guerrero, Mexico. Altitude 1.200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 209.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 434.
  • Synonymes:
    M. bella

    M. deliusiana

Mammillaria nunezii ssp nunezii

  • First description by Britton & Rose, Cact. 4: 120 (1923)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, occasionally forming offsets. Stems globose to cylindrical, gray-green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high, 6 – 9 cm (2.4 – 3.5 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Conical to bluntly four-angled.
  • Axil: With bristles.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 30, stiff, slender, white, 5 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 9, all straight or one hooked, brown with blackish tips, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, magenta, to 15 mm (0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, greenish white tinged with pink, to 25 mm (1 in) long
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guerrero, Morelos, Jalisco and Michoacan, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 1.600 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 208.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 434.
  • Synonymes:
    M. hubertmulleri

    M. nunezii var. solisii

    M. silvatica

    M. solisii

    M. supraflumen

    M. wuthenauiana

Mammillaria orcuttii

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt. Ges. 2: 258 (1930)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems globose to short club shaped, glossy blue-green.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Short conical, rounded apically.
  • Axil: Strongly woolly.
  • Radial spine: None. Sometimes 6 – 8 short hairlike spines.
  • Central spine: 4 – 5, blackish brown, 8 – 20 mm (0.3 – 0.8 in) long.
  • Flower: Bright carmine with darker midveins, to 12 mm (0.5 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 1.200 – 2.200 m.
  • Comments: One of the large tubercled green species that will become a quite large solitary plant with time. Easily grown, it does best if encouraged to grow with ample water and fertilizer. An open potting soil with an addition of limestone is often recommended.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 210.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 435.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria oteroi

  • First description by Glass & Foster, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 47(2): 94 (1975)

  • Body: Plants profusely clustering with offsets readily detaching. Stems globose, pale green, 2 – 3 cm (0.8 – 1.2 in) high, 3 – 4 cm (1.2 – 1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Slender, flabby, cylindrical.
  • Axil: With wool and a few bristles.
  • Radial spine: 12 – 14, white with brown tips, 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, strongly hooked, erect, reddish brown with whitish base, to 11 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: White with brownish red midveins, 15 – 16 mm (0.6 in) long, 7 – 8 mm (0.3 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Globose, bright red, 7 – 8 mm (0.3 in) in diameter.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 1.800 – 2.250 m.
  • Comments: An undemanding species that will vigorously produce offsets in a random fashion. In order to produce the tightest appearing plant, provide high light levels and regular repotting to keep up with its relatively rapid growth. Care in repotting is needed as the offsets readily separate from the parent plant.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 212.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 435.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria parkinsonii

  • First description by Ehrenberg, linnaea 14: 375 (1840)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later branching dichotomously. Stems depressed globose to cylindrical, blue-green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high, 10 – 15 cm (3.9 – 5.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Pyramidal.
  • Axil: With wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 30 or more, fine, white, slightly curved, 4 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 5, usually curved slightly downwards, stiff, whitish with dark tips, upper ones 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long, lower ones to 38 mm (1.5 in) long.
  • Flower: Pale yellow with red midveins, 12 – 15 mm (0.5 – 0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, reddish orange, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.200 – 2.400 m.
  • Comments: One of the species with the capability of forming very large clumps. In order to keep the clumps tightly formed, high light levels and steady growth are needed; otherwise there is the danger of having a number of elongated heads that are somewhat separated from one another. This species is especially variable in spine length. Grows by dichotomous division.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 213.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 435.
  • Synonymes:
    M. auriareolis

    M. cadereytensis (?)

    M. dietrichiae

    M. neocrucigera

    M. parkinsonii var dietrichiae

    M. rosensis

Mammillaria pectinifera

  • First description by Weber, Bois Dict. Hort. 804 (1898)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globose to short cylindrical, 1 – 3 cm (0.4 – 1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: Naked. Areoles long, narrow.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 40, pectinate, flattened against the body, white, 1.5 – 2 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: White to pale pink with darker midveins, 20 – 30 mm (0.8 – 1.2 in) long and in diameter. Stigmas green.
  • Fruit: Red, small, barely protuding above the spines.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla, Mexico. Altitude 1.900 m.
  • Comments: Considered one of the more difficult species of Mammillaria. A very open potting mix that has added limestone and a somewhat small pot will be of benefit; those along with careful watering and high light levels will increase the grower?s success. Be sure to keep the plant well above the actual soil, and support it with a layer of open gravel as a top dressing to keep the plant body as dry as possible, both to avoid rot and to keep the spines unstained.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 214.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 435.
  • Synonymes:
    Pelecyphora aselliformis var pectinifera Hort

    Pelecyphora pectinata

    Solisia pectinata

Mammillaria peninsularis

  • First description by Britton & Rose, The Cact. 4: 85 (1923)

  • Body: Plants solitary or forming clumps, barely rising above ground level. Stems flattened globose, blue-green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule: Erect, pointed, four-angled.
  • Axil: With long white wool at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 4 – 8, one nearly central in location, nearly erect, stiff, light brown with darker tips, to 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: Usually absent.
  • Flower: Pale yellow or greenish, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Brown.
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Southern tip of the peninsula, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Altitude 10 – 200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 216.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 435.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria pennispinosa

  • First description by Krainz, Sukkulentenk. 2: 20 (1948)

  • Body: Plants solitary, eventually forming clusters. Stems globose, 3 – 4 cm (1.2 – 1.6 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots: Tick taproots.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Flabby, cylindrical.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 20, slender, straight, plumose, grayish white to yellow to orange to reddish, 5 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 3, pubescent, brownish red with yellow bases, 10 – 12 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) long, one hooked.
  • Flower: White with pink midveins, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -6? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila and Durango, Mexico. Altitude 1.200 – 1.350 m.
  • Comments: One of the hooked spined miniature, this species is difficult to keep growing in cultivation. Very prone to root rot, it needs a very open potting soil and a very careful application of water. Additionally, water should not be applied overhead, as the feathery spines will retain water and add to rotting problems. Full light short of the direct sun and high temperatures are helpful, and needed to encourage flowering.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 217.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 436.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria perbella

  • First description by Hildmann ex Schumann, Gesamtb. Kakt. 567 (1898)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later forming clusters by abundant dichotomous branching. Stems depressed globose, glaucous green, to 6 cm (2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Small, conical.
  • Axil: With white wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 14 – 18, bristle-like, white, the longest with black tips, 1.5 – 3 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, usually2, sometimes absent,stout, reddish white, becoming whitish, 1 – 6 mm (to 0.2 on) long, upper one longest.
  • Flower: Camine to deep pink, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red, small.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Hidalgo and Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.700 – 2.300 m.
  • Comments: This species will form clumps of tightly packed heads by dichotomous division. Rather than forming a high rounded mound, the best forms are low and hug the soil much like M. formosa ssp microthele. Expect slow growth.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 218.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 436.
  • Synonymes:
    M. avila-camachoi

    M. infernillensis

    M. queretarica

Mammillaria perezdelarosae ssp perezdelarosae

  • First description by Bravo & Scheinvar, Cact. Succ. Mex. 30(4): 76 (1985)

  • Body: Plants solitary or forming clusters with the stem covered by spines. Stems depressed globose to short cylindrical, bright dark green, to 7.5 cm (3 in) high and 4.5 cm (1.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Usually without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical with rounded tips.
  • Axil: With bristles.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 60, pectinately arranged, needle- to hair-like, white with yellowish bases, 2 – 3.5 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, ascending, dark red, 11 – 14 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long, lowermost one hooked.
  • Flower: Greenish white to cream, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brownish black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Jalisco and Aguascalientes, Mexico. Altitude 2.000 – 2.400 m.
  • Comments: This species initially forms a simple unbranched plant that is quite narrow at the base and becomes wider as it becomes taller, much like a child?s toy top. A supporting device may be needed to avoid toppling over. With time, offsets will form. Occasionally, plants will offset when quite young, and dense clumps of spherical bodies will result. Growth is slow to moderate, and the best plants are grown somewhat slowly to conserve the dense spination.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 219.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 436.
  • Synonymes:
    M. bombycina ssp perezdelarosae

Mammillaria petrophila ssp arida

  • First description by Rose ex Quehl, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 23: 181 (1913)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, later forming small clumps of half a dozen stems.. Stems almost globose, gray-green, to 6 – 7 cm high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Short, angled, conical.
  • Axil: With dense white wool.
  • Radial spine: About 15, fine, bristle-like, yellowish tipped brown, 6 – 10 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 7, usually 5 or 6, dark brown, needle-like, 12 to 16 mm long.
  • Flower: Cream to greenish, pale yellow, with dark midveins, outer petals with dull reddish brown to purplish midvein and green margins, stigmas green, about 1 cm long, 2.5 cm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Rocky hills.
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California Sur, Mexico. Altitude 10 – 120 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 223.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 437.
  • Synonymes:
    M. arida

Mammillaria petrophila ssp baxteriana

  • First description by Gates, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 6(1): 3 (1934)

  • Body: Plants solitary, rarely clustering. Stems depressed globose, gray-green, to 10 cm high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Short, angled, conical.
  • Axil: With short white wool.
  • Radial spine: 8 – 10, slender, stiff, needle-like, brown, with dark tips sometimes in youth, to 15 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: Usually 1, needle-like, white with brown tip ageing to white, 15 – 20 mm long.
  • Flower: Yellow with light reddish stripes on the outer petals, stigmas pale yellow.
  • Fruit: Purple red.
  • Seed: Brown
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California Sur, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 223.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 436.
  • Synonymes:
    M. baxteriana

    M. marshaliana

    M. pacifica

Mammillaria petrophila ssp petrophila

  • First description by K. Brandegee, Zoe 5: 193 (1904)

  • Body: Plants solitary, later clustering randomly. Stems depressed globose to short cylindrical, gray-green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Short, angled, conical.
  • Axil: With dense white wool.
  • Radial spine: About 10, slender, stiff, needle-like, dark chesnut-brown, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, dark brown to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Flower: Bright greenish yellow, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter. Stigmas greenish yellow.
  • Fruit: Red, small, roundish.
  • Seed: Reddish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Steep coastal hillside.
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California Sur, Mexico. Altitude from sea level to 1.800 m.
  • Comments: A somewhat variable species that will slowly increase in size to form a moderately sized sphere to short column. With time, some plants offset to form clumps. Care with watering is needed; too much may make the plant prone to root rot. A freely draining potting mix will help. Temperature levels also should be higher than for most Mammillaria to encourage flowering.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 221.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 436.
  • Synonymes:
    M. gatesii

Mammillaria petterssonii

  • First description by Hildmann, Deutsche Gartenz. 5: 185 (1886)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems globose, dull light green, to 12 cm (4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Large, three-angled.
  • Axil: Woolly
  • Radial spine: 10 or more, stiff, straight, white, 2 – 10 mm (to 0.4 in) long, uppermost shorter and weaker.
  • Central spine: 6 – 7, orange brown, with age becoming whitish with dark tips, 10 – 20 mm (0.4 – 0.8 in) long, lowermost longer.
  • Flower: Pinkish red to white, with reddish midveins, to 25 mm (1 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Purplish pink.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato and Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 2.600 m.
  • Comments: This species is capable of forming large clumps, and each head in the clump can be quite large also. There is a range of spine color and length. The longer spined forms offer special challenges, especially when repotting, but their beauty more than compensates for any dangers. Regular repotting is needed, and watering and feeding during the growing season should be appropriate for its rapid growth.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 224.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 437.
  • Synonymes:
    M. apozolensis

    M. apozolensis var saltensis

    M. hamiltonhoytea

    M. hamiltonhoytea var fulvaflora

    M. hamiltonhoytea var pilensis

    M. huiguerensis

    M. obscura (?)

    M. pilensis

Mammillaria phitauiana

  • First description by Baxter, Journ. Cact. Succ. Soc. 2:471 (1931)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters from basal branches. Stems cylindrical, gray-green, to 25 cm (9.8 in) high, 3 – 6 cm (1.2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Conical, four-sided basally, keeled.
  • Axil: With about 20 bristles.
  • Radial spine: 24, white, bristle-like, 4 – 12 mm (to 0.5 in) long, lower longest.
  • Central spine: 4, straight, white with dark tips, 4 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long, one hooked in young plants.
  • Flower: White, 12 – 15 mm (0.5 – 0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Globose to club-shaped, red, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California Sur, Mexico. Altitude 200 – 450 m.
  • Comments: This slow growing species forms columns that can become decumbent with age. It is recommended to have a very open potting mix, and a smaller than usual pot to prevent root rot. Expect differences in spine color with the seasonal changes in growth rate. With time, clusters may form.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 226.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 437.
  • Synonymes:
    M. verhaertiana

Mammillaria picta ssp picta

  • First description by Meinshausen in Wochenschr. G?rtn. Pflantz. 1:27 (1858)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globose to ovoid, dark green, 4 – 5 cm (1.6 – 2 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots: Tuberous.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: With a few twisted hairlike bristles.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 20, pubescent, yellow basally, white with dark tips or amber yellow, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long, lower 4 very long, slender and white.
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, clearly distinguishable, erect, straight, brownish, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Wide funnelform, greenish white, to 9 mm (0.4 in) long and 11 mm (0.4 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Elongated, red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 227.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 437.
  • Synonymes:
    M. auriseta

    M. schieliana

Mammillaria picta ssp viereckii

  • First description by Boedeker, Zeitsch. Sukk.Kunde 3:73 (1927)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globose to ovoid, dark green, about 6 cm high and in diameter.
  • Roots: Tuberous.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: With a few twisted hairlike bristles.
  • Radial spine: 12 – 20, amber yellow, bristle-like, 4 – 8 mm long.
  • Central spine: Not clearly distinguishable.
  • Flower: Wide funnelform, greenish white, to 9 mm (0.4 in) long and 11 mm (0.4 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Elongated, red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Altitude 870 – 1.750 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 228.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 437.
  • Synonymes:
    M. viereckii

Mammillaria pilispina

  • First description by J.A. Purpus, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 22: 150 (1912)

  • Body: Plants forming clumps. Stems semiglobose, to 4 cm (1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: With wool and a few hairlike bristles.
  • Radial spine: Several, very fine, pubescent, hairlike, white, in a ring behind the other spines.
  • Central spine: 7, erect, straight and 6 subradial spines at the top and on the sides of the areoles, white, yellow basally, with dark tips, pubescent, 6 – 7 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: Creamy white, sometimes with pinkish midveins, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Reddish orange.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas and San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 900 – 1.500 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 229.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 437.
  • Synonymes:
    M. rayonensis

    M. sanluisensis

    M. subtilis

Mammillaria plumosa

  • First description by Weber in Bois, Dict. Hort. 804 (1898)

  • Body: Plants forming low, dense mounds to 40 cm (16 in) wide. Stems globose, light green, 6 – 7 cm (2.4 – 2.8 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13 (irregular)
  • Tubercule: Very soft, cylindrical.
  • Axil: Woolly.
  • Radial spine: About 40, plumose, white, 3 – 7 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: White, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, deep purple rose, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Blackish brown to black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Coahuila and Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Altitude 780 – 1.350 m.
  • Comments: Listed in Appendix 1 of CITES.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 230.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 438.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria polyedra

  • First description by Martius, Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. 16(1): 326 t.18 (1832)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later forming clumps. Stems globose to short cylindrical, deep green, to 30 cm (12 in) high, 10 – 12 cm (3.9 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Pyramidal, six- or seven-sided.
  • Axil: With wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 4 – 6, straight, brownish yellow with purple tips, 6 – 25 mm (0.2 – 1 in) long, upper ones longest and strongest.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Pink, to 25 mm (1 in) long.
  • Fruit: Wide club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 1.400 – 1.650 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 231.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 438.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria polythele ssp durispina

  • First description by Boedeker, Zeitschr. Sukk. 3: 342 (1928)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems subglobose or shortly columnar, blue green, seldom more than about 20 cm high, 5 – 6 cm (2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13, but also 21 – 34
  • Tubercule: Prominent, globular conical.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 6 – 8 of varying lenths to 15 mm (0.6 in), pale to dark brown, sometimes reddish brown.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Carmine, to 15 mm long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Dark brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato and Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 2.000 – 2350 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 233.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 438.
  • Synonymes:
    M. durispina

    M. kelleriana

    M. subdurispina

Mammillaria polythele ssp obconella

  • First description by Scheidweiler, Bull. Acad. Brux. 6: 91 (1839)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems cylindrical, blue green, to 20 cm or more high, up to 15 cm (5.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Prominent, globular conical.
  • Axil: Woolly
  • Radial spine: 4, unequal in lenth, arranged in a cross, straight, a little curved, yellowish brown at first, later grey.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Pink, about 12.5 mm long and wide, stigmas pink.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, dull carmine-pink, or greenish.
  • Seed: Brown..
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 1.850 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 234.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 438.
  • Synonymes:
    M. crocidata

    M. ingens

    M. obconella

    M. obconella var galeotii

Mammillaria polythele ssp polythele

  • First description by Martius, Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. 16(1): 328, t.19 (1832)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems cylindrical, usually erect but sometimes sprawling, blue green, to 60 cm (24 in) high, 8 – 10 cm (3.1 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Prominent, globular conical.
  • Axil: Woolly
  • Radial spine: Only 2 at first and pointing up and down, later 3 – 4, pale to dark brown, sometimes reddish brown, to 25 mm (1 in) long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Rose to pinkish purple, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Dark brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Guanajuato and Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.700 – 2.400m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 232.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 438.
  • Synonymes:
    M. hidalgensis

    M. hoffmanniana

    M. kewensis

    M. neophaeacantha

    M. tetracantha

    M. xochipilli

Mammillaria pondii ssp maritima

  • First description by Lindsay, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 8(9): 143-4 (1937) as Cochemiae maritima

  • Body: Plants forming large clumps to 1 m (3.3 ft) wide. Stems elongated cylindrical, erect or decumbent, blue-green, to 50 cm long, 3 – 7 cm (1.2 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Subconical, slightly flattened laterally.
  • Axil: Gray wool.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 15, white with black tips, spreading, to 4 cm (1.6 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4, reddish brow, upper 3 ascending, straight, 1 – 2 cm (0.4 – 0.8 in) long, the lower one horizontally extended outward and forwards, hooked, 2 – 5 cm (0.8 – 2 in) long.
  • Flower: Zygomorphic, trumpet shaped, flared and reflexed, with the styles twice as long as the perianth, to 3 cm (1.2 in) long, scarlet, stigmas scarlet.
  • Fruit: Fat, globose, red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Along the Pacific coast of Baja California, Mexico. Altitude 10 – 100 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 236.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 166 – Cochemiae maritima.
  • Synonymes:
    M. maritima

    Cochemiea maritima

Mammillaria pondii ssp pondii

  • First description by Greene, Pittonia 1: 268 (1889)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later branching to form small clumps. Stems cylindrical, to 30 cm (12 in) long, 3 – 7 cm (1.2 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: With bristles.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 30, slender, white, sometimes brownish.
  • Central spine: 4 – 5, one rigid and strongly hooked, whitish with dark brown tips, to 25 mm (1 in) long.
  • Flower: to 50 mm (2 in) long; stamens sometimes exserted.
  • Fruit: Purplish red.
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Cedros Island, Baja California, Mexico. Altitude near sea level to 200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 235.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 166 – Cochemiae pondii.
  • Synonymes:
    Cochemiea pondii

Mammillaria pondii ssp setispina

  • First description by J. Coulter, Contr. US Nat. Herb. 3: 106 (1894) as Cactus setispinus

  • Body: Plants forming clusters. Stems cylindrical, light gray-green, to 30 cm (12 in) high, 3 – 6 cm (1.2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Short, broadly conical.
  • Axil: Woolly.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 12, unequal, slender, flexible, white with dark tips, 1 – 3.5 cm (0.4 – 1.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, upper one straight, lower one longest and hooked, 2 – 5 cm (0.8 – 2 in) long
  • Flower: Longtubed, 5 cm or more long, zygomorphic, scarlet, stamens strongly exserted.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, dark red, to 2 cm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California, Mexico. Altitude 200 – 400 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 237.
    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 167 – as Cochemiae setispina
  • Synonymes:
    M. setispina

    Cochemiea setispina

Mammillaria poselgeri

  • First description by Hildmann, Gart. Zeit. 4:559 (1885)

  • Body: Plants branching basally to form clumps with the stems often hanging from the rocks. Stems cylindrical, to 2 m (6.6 ft) long and 4 cm (1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Widespread, three-sided, rounded apically.
  • Axil: Woolly, sometimes with a few bristles.
  • Radial spine: 8, brown with white tips, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, hooked, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long.
  • Flower: Scarlet, longtubed, zygomorphic, to 3 cm (1.2 in) long.
  • Fruit: Globose to broadly elongated, red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California Sur, Mexico. Altitude from sea lvel to 120 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 238.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 167 – as Cochemiae setispina
  • Synonymes:
    Cochemiea poselgeri

Mammillaria pottsii

  • First description by Scheer ex Salm-Dyck, Cact. Hort. 1849: 104 (1850)

  • Body: Plants branching basally and along the stems. Stems cylindrical, blue green, to 20 cm (7.9 in) high, 2.5 – 3 cm (1 – 1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Somewhat woolly.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 45, slender, interlacing, white, straight, 3 – 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: Usually 7, rigid, swollen basally, spreading, curved, brown to bluish black, 4 – 12 mm (to 0.5 in) long, upper one stout, recurved to erect.
  • Flower: Not opening widely, brownish red, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black to blackish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Texas, USA and throughout northern Mexico in Coahuila, Chihuahua, Durango and Zacatecas. Altitude 800 – 2.10 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 239.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 438.
  • Synonymes:
    M. leona

    M. pottsii var gigas

    M. pottsii var multicaulis

Mammillaria prolifera ssp arachnoidea

  • First description by Hunt, Cact. Succ. j. (GB) 40(1): 11 (1978)

  • Body: Plants commonly branching to form large clusters. Stems globose to cylindrical to club shaped, dark green, to 9 cm (3.5 in) high, 4 – 7 cm (2.4 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical to conical, soft.
  • Axil: Naked or with several long fine hairs.
  • Radial spine: 25 – 40, often intergrading with the centrals, straight or twisted, white to yellow to brown, bristle- to hairlike, 3 – 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Central spine: Slender, fine, hardly distinguishable from the radials.
  • Flower: Cream or pinkish yellow, quite narrow funnelform
  • Fruit: Club shaped to cylindrical, red, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Hidalgo, Mexico. Altitude 300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 241.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 439.
  • Synonymes:
    M. multiceps var humilis (?)

    M. prolifera var arachnoidea

Mammillaria prolifera ssp prolifera

  • First description by Miller, Gard. Dict. ed.8 (Cactus species no. 6) (1768)

  • Body: Plants commonly branching to form large clusters. Stems globose to cylindrical to club shaped, dark green, to 9 cm (3.5 in) high, 6 – 7 cm (2.4 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical to conical, soft.
  • Axil: Naked or with several long fine hairs.
  • Radial spine: 25 – 40, often intergrading with the centrals, straight or twisted, yellow, bristle- to hairlike, 3 – 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Central spine: 5 – 12, slender, needle-like, straight, pubescent, yellow, with darker tips, 4 – 9 mm (to 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Cream or pinkish yellow, 10 – 18 mm (0.4 – 0.7 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped to cylindrical, red, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: the Caribbean. Altitude 30 – 50 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 241.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 439.
  • Synonymes:
    M. glomerata (?)

    M. prolifera var/ssp haitiensis

Mammillaria prolifera ssp texana

  • First description by Englemann, Cact. Mex. Bound. 5 (1859)

  • Body: Plants commonly branching to form large clusters. Stems globose, dark green, 5 – 7 cm (to 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical to conical, soft.
  • Axil: With white bristles.
  • Radial spine: Over 50, slender, needle-like, straight, smooth, white or pale yellow, 5 – 9 mm long, interlacing.
  • Central spine: 8 – 12, needle like, a little stronger than the radials, straight, smooth, stiff, white with brown tip or honey yellow, one porrect, the others spreading, 4 – 7 mm long.
  • Flower: White margins and brownish pink midstripe, or creamy yellow to pale yellow, about 15 mm wide, 20 mm long.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Texas, USA and Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, Queretaro, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 400 – 2.250 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 243.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 439.
  • Synonymes:
    M. multiceps

    M. multiceps var elongata

    M. multiceps var grisea

    M. multiceps var perpusilla

    M. pusilla var texana

Mammillaria rekoi ssp aureispina

  • First description by Lau, Cact. Suc. Mex. 28(1): 19 (1983)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first later clustering. Stems short cylindrical, green, to 12 – 15 cm (5.9 in) high, 5 – 6 cm (2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Sometimes with latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 23, fine, needle-like, golden yellow later white, 7 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 5 – 7, stouter than the radials, yellow to golden brown, needle-like, straight, 6 – 15 mm or more long, the lower being the longest.
  • Flower: Purplish pink, 10 mm lon,g, 12 mm in diameter, recurving at the tips of the petals.
  • Fruit: Purplish, reddish below.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 1.200 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 245.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 440.
  • Synonymes:
    M. aureispina

    M. rekoi var aureispina

Mammillaria rekoi ssp leptacantha

  • First description by Lau, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 55(2): 69 (1983)

  • Body: Plants solitary to clustering, with 4 to 7 heads. Stems 8 – 10 cm high, 5 – 6 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Sometimes with latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: With white wool at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 27 – 30, 4 – 6 mm long, curving, hooked, sometimes slightly twisted, thin.
  • Central spine: 4 – 6 curved and hooked.
  • Flower: Purple-pink, edged greenish brown. 20 mm long, 15 mm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Brownish red with reddish base.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 700 – 850 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography: <br>John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 245.
    <br>Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 440.
  • Synonymes: <br>M. leptacantha
    <br>M. rekoi var leptacantha

Mammillaria rekoi ssp rekoi

  • First description by Britton & Rose Cact. 4: 141 (1923)

  • Body: Clustering at about 3 or 4 years old from seed. Stems globose to short cylindrical, green, to 12 cm high, 5 – 6 cm (2 – 2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Sometimes with latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: With short white wool and white bristles.
  • Radial spine: About 20, fine, needle-like, white, 4 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4, much stouter than the radials, brown, hooked or sometimes straight, 10 – 15 mm (1.4 – 0.6 in) long, the lower one sometimes strongly hooked.
  • Flower: Deep purple, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long, stigmas greenish. The petals flaring back at the ends, rather than opening widely.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 1.100 – 3.000 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 244.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 439.
  • Synonymes:
    M. albrechtiana

    M. krasuckae

    M. mitlensis

    M. pseudorekoi

    M. pullihamata

    M. rekoiana

    M. sanjuanensis

Mammillaria rettigiana

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt.- Ges. 2: 98 (1930)

  • Body: Solitary. Stems depressed or elongated-globose, 4 – 8 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Glossy dark leaf-green, tall cylindric, conic at tip, 8 – 10 mm long, 3 mm wide at base.
  • Axil: Naked or with very little wool.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 20, to 10 mm long, thin, needle-like, white.
  • Central spine: 3 – 4, reddish brown, the lowermost hooked, to 15 mm long, the others straight, to 12 mm long.
  • Flower: Pale pink, about 15 mm wide, stigmas whitish.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Guanajuato, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 247.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – referred to M. mercadensis
  • Synonymes:
    M. flavihamata (?)

    M. posseltiana

Mammillaria rhodantha ssp aureiceps

  • First description by Lemaire, Cact. Aliq. Nov. 8 (1838)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, occasionally branching dichotomously. Stems thick columnar, to 40 cm or more high.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Obtuse conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: Woolly at first and with a few bristles.
  • Radial spine: 25, long, thin, golden yellow, 6 – 7 mm long.
  • Central spine: 6 – 7, darker golden yellow than the radials, nearly 2 cm long.
  • Flower: Purplish red, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter, stigmas usually purple.
  • Fruit: Cylindrical to club shaped, dull purplish red, often paler and whitish or greenish at the base, 15 – 25 mm (0.6 – 1 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, Mexico, Guanajuato, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 249.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 440.
  • Synonymes:
    M. aureiceps

    M. rhodantha var aureiceps

    M. rhodantha var sulphurea

Mammillaria rhodantha ssp fera-rubra

  • First description by Schmoll ex Craig, Mamm Handbook 309 (1945)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globose to short cylindrical, to 10 cm high, 9 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Obtuse conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: With short wool.
  • Radial spine: 15 – 18, 3 – 7 mm long, upper shorter, slender, smooth, straight, white.
  • Central spine: 6, occasionally 7, 12 mm long, straight to slightly curved, orange brown, base yellowish tan, 7th when present is mid center and porrect.
  • Flower: Deep purplish pink, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and 16 mm (0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Cylindrical to club shaped, greenish to pale pinkish purple, 15 – 25 mm (0.6 – 1 in) long.
  • Seed: Orange brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, Muchoacan, Zacatecas, Jalisco, Mexico. Altitude 2.000 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 249.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 440.
  • Synonymes: br>M. fera-rubra

Mammillaria rhodantha ssp mccartenii

  • First description by Reppenhagen, Gatt. Mamm. 68 (1987)

  • Body: Plants solitary, 3.5 – 10 cm high (taller in cultivation), 4 – 8.5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Obtuse conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: With white wool.
  • Radial spine: 13 – 15, white, 4 – 8 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 7, needle-like, brown; 5 – 15 mm long.
  • Flower: Scarlet, about 1 cm long and in diameter, stigmas pink to red.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Michoacan, Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 1.800 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 250.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 440.
  • Synonymes:
    M. verticealba

    M. verticealba var zacatecasensis

Mammillaria rhodantha ssp mollendorffiana

  • First description by Shurly, Cact. Succ. J. (GB) 10(1): 19 (1948)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems globose to short cylindrical, to 7 cm high (in cultivation to about 10 or 15 cm).
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Obtuse conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: With wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 24 – 28, white.
  • Central spine: 4 – 6, needle-like, brownish red.
  • Flower: Purplish red, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter, stigmas usually purple.
  • Fruit: Cylindrical to club shaped, dull purplish red, often paler and whitish or greenish at the base, 15 – 25 mm (0.6 – 1 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Mexico. Altitude 2.000 – 2.600 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 251.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 440.
  • Synonymes:
    M. mollendorffiana

Mammillaria rhodantha ssp pringlei

  • First description by J. Coulter, Contrib. US. Nat. Herb. 3: 109 (1894)

  • Body: Solitary, or branching dichotomously. Stems depressed globose to globose, to 15 cm high, 12 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Obtuse conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: With fine bristle-like hairs to 10 mm long.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 22, fine, needle-like, straw yellow, 7 – 9 mm long.
  • Central spine: 6 – 8, 20 to 30 mm long, stronger than the radials, deeper yellow, the upper usually the longest and recurving and intertwining over the crown of the stem.
  • Flower: 14 – 18 mm long and in diam?tre, bright rose-purple, stigmas rose-purple or yellowish.
  • Fruit: Cylindrical to club shaped, dull purplish red, often paler and whitish or greenish at the base, 15 – 25 mm (0.6 – 1 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Mexico, Jalisco, Guanajuato, Queretaro, Hidalgo, Mexico. altitude 1.200 – 2.300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 252.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 440.
  • Synonymes:
    M. parensis

    M. pringlei

Mammillaria rhodantha ssp rhodantha

  • First description by Link & Otto, Ic. Pl. Rar. Hort. Berol., 51, t.26 (1829)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, occasionally branching dichotomously or producing offsets. Stems globose to short cylindrical, dark dull-green, to 40 cm high, 12 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Obtuse conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: Woolly in the young growth and with a few bristles.
  • Radial spine: 17 – 24, long, thin, glassy white to pale yellow, 4 – 9 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 9, usually somewhat curved, typically reddish brown, to 18 mm (-25 mm) long.
  • Flower: Purplish red, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter, stigmas usually purple.
  • Fruit: Cylindrical to club shaped, dull purplish red, often paler and whitish or greenish at the base, 15 – 25 mm (0.6 – 1 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Mexico, Hidalgo, Michoacan, Queretaro, Guanajuato, Mexico. Altitude 1.700 – 3.300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 248.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 440.
  • Synonymes:
    M. bonavitii

    M. calacantha

    M. fuscata (?)

Mammillaria roseoalba

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt.-Ges. 1(4): 87 (1929)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed globose, to 6 cm (2.4 in) high, 8 – 10 cm (3.1 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Distinctly angled, keeled.
  • Axil: Densely woolly.
  • Radial spine: 4 – 5, rarely 6, slightly curved, unequal, needle-like, whitish with pink bases, to 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Whitish, to 30 mm (1.2 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 720 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 253.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 440.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria saboae ssp goldii

  • First description by Glass & Foster, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 40(4): 151 (1968) – as M. goldii; l.c. 51(3): 124 (1979)

  • Body: Plants solitary or rarely clustering, with globose stems to 2.5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots: Thick, fleshy branching.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: naked.
  • Radial spine: 35 – 45, thin, opaque, glassy white, 2 to 3 mm long, interlacing.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Large, funnelform, dark lavender-pink, stigmas whitish.
  • Fruit: Remains in the plant body.
  • Seed: Large; black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): March.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: greyish-white volcanic tuff.
  • Geographic Distribution: Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 to 1.300 m.
  • Comments: Areoles have buff coloured wool in youth.

    The overall effect is pale yellow from the wool on the areoles.

    In culture, mineral substrate.
  • Bibliography: John Pilbeam – Mammillaria The Cactus Handbook File (1999) – page 255

    Edward F. Anderson – The Cactus Family (2001) – page 441.
  • Synonymes:
    M. goldii

    M. saboae var goldii

Mammillaria saboae ssp haudeana

  • First description by (Lau & Wagner) Hunt, Mamm. Postscripts 7: 3 (1998); Lau & Wagner, Kakt. and Sukk. 29(11): 250 (1978) – as M. haudeana.

  • Body: Plants solitary, later clustering, to 20 mm in diameter, 40 mm tall. About twice the size of the type.
  • Roots: fleshy branching.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 27, glassy white, thin, a little curved, 5 to 6 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: To 6.5 cm in diameter, dark lilac-pink, larger and deeper coloured than the type, stigmas yellowish.
  • Fruit: Retained in the stem, as in the type.
  • Seed: Larger than the type, to 2.2 mm long, 1.8 mm wide, and black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): May.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: volcanic slabs of rock.
  • Geographic Distribution: Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 1.500 to 2.000 m.
  • Comments: In culture, mineral substrate.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam – Mammillaria The Cactus Handbook File (1999) – page 256

    Edward F. Anderson – The Cactus Family (2001) – page 441.
  • Synonymes:
    M. haudeana

    M. saboae fa/var haudeana

Mammillaria saboae ssp saboae

  • First description by Glass, Cact. Suc. Mex. 11: 55 (1966)

  • Body: Plants solitary or forming clumps. Stems ovoid, green, 1 – 4 cm (0.4 – 1.6 in) high, 1 – 2 cm (0.4 – 0.8 in) in diametre.
  • Roots: Fleshy branching.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Small, rounded.
  • Axil: naked.
  • Radial spine: 17 – 45, slender, glassy white, yellow basally, slightly curved, to 2 mm long.
  • Central spine: absent, rarely one, straight to 2 mm long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, pink, to 65 mm (2.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Sunken in the stem.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): March.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua and Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 2.100 to 2.200 mtr.
  • Comments: Very sensitive to red spider mite.
    Preventive treatment necessary.
    Damageable by excessive sunlight.
    In culture, mineral substrate.
    This miniature will form mats of small soft bodied stems. A shallow pot is best, filled with a very open potting mix. Overhead watering is helpful in controlling mites. Initially this species appears easy in cultivation, but the grower should not be surprised if clumps suddenly dry up, especially in the winter season.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 254.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 441.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria sanchez-mejoradae

  • First description by Gonzales, Cact. Suc. Mex. 37(3): 55 (1992)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globose to globose, bright green, to 3 cm (1.2 in) high, 1 – 3 cm (0.4 – 1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 40, pectinate, hairlike, rigid, white, flattened against the tubercules, to 8 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Whitish, to 30 mm (1.2 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 1.900 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments: A small pot with fast draining soil will be required, and the plant should be planted high, with gravel top dressing partially supporting it above the potting mix. Very slow in growth, with small clumps forming over time.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 258.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 441.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria sartorii

  • First description by J.A. Purpus, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 21: 50 (1911)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters. Stems globose to somewhat elongated but usually flat-topped, dark glaucous green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) high, 8 – 12 cm (3.1 – 4.7 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Closely set, pyramidal, strongly four-angled basally.
  • Axil: With dense white to yellow wool and sparse to numerous bristles.
  • Radial spine: Up to 12, sometimes absent, white, bristle like, 1 – 2 mm long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 10, extremely variable, some subcentral, brownish white with brown tips, 1 – 8 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: Pale carmine with darker midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Very small, brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Veracruz, Mexico. Altitude 10 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments: A species that can be described as average in cultivation requirements. It will begin to cluster at an early age. Somewhat prone to sunburn, it should be gradually acclimatized to the brighter light which promotes flowering. Faster than average in growth rate.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 259.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 441.
  • Synonymes:
    M. tenampensis

Mammillaria scheinvariana

  • First description by R. Ortega-Varela & Glass, Guide to the identification of Threatened Cacti of Mexico 1 (1997)

  • Body: Plants solitary or sparingly clustering. Stems subglobose, about 5 cm in diameter, 2 – 3.5 cm high, areoles white woolly.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With fine white haires.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 24, to 20 mm long, white, soft, smooth, hair-like, ascending.
  • Central spine: 1, straight, about 16 mm long, porrect, pale yellowish tan to pale reddish yellow, darker towards tip.
  • Flower: Funnelform, nearly 2 cm long, about 1 m wide, with palest pinkish white to white margins and tapering faint pink midstripe, filaments bright lavender, anthers whitish.
  • Fruit: Dark cherry red.
  • Seed: Shiny black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro and Hidalgo, Mexico, in the area now occupied by the Zimapan dam. Not known to occur elsewhere, and therefore possibly extinct in the wild.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 260.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – referred to M. crinita
  • Synonymes:
    M. crinita ssp scheinvariana

Mammillaria schiedeana ssp dumetorum

  • First description by J. Purpus, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 22: 149 (1912)

  • Body: Plants usually clustering. Stems flattened globose, dark green, 5.5 cm high, 3.5 – 7.5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical, tapered towards the tips.
  • Axil: With hairs, but no wool.
  • Radial spine: In 2 or 3 series, 30 close to the stem, fine, needle-like to bristle-like, 12 – 14 over these; a little thicker, stiff, glassy white to yellowish, yellow at the base.
  • Central spine: Occasionally 1, stiff, glassy white to yellowish, yellow at the base.
  • Flower: Whitish, about 1 cm long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Queretaro, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 1.150 – 2.250 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 262.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 441.
  • Synonymes:
    M. dumetorum

    M. schiedeana var dumetorum

Mammillaria schiedeana ssp giselae

  • First description by J.G. Martinez-Avalos & Glass, Bradleya 15: 73 (1997)

  • Body: Clustering, with small stems, 35 (rarely to 180) mm high, with up to 15, or rarely as many as 35 stems.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 21, fine needle-like, pale yellow, almost orange, flexible, somewhat pectinated, 4 – 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: Usually 1 or 2, but possibly up to 5, or absent, set between the series of radials and very short, from 0.17 mm long.
  • Flower: Pale pink to pink, with darker, narrow midveins, 12 – 14 mm long, 10 – 13 mm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Pale tomato red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 263.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 441.
  • Synonymes:
    M. giselae

Mammillaria schiedeana ssp schiedeana

  • First description by Ehrenberg, Allg. Gartenz. 6: 249 (1838)

  • Body: Plants usually clustering. Stems flattened globose, dark green, 5 – 10 cm (2 – 3.9 in) high, 8 – 10cm in diameter.
  • Roots: Fleshy
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical, tapered towards the tips.
  • Axil: With white woolly hairs protuding above the tubercules or absent.
  • Radial spine: Up to 120, in several series, fine, pubescent, white, yellowish towards the bases and golden yellow at the base, or all yellow, 2 – 5 mm long, tips hairlike.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: White, to 1 – 1.5 cm long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Bright carmine red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 5.000 m.
  • Comments: This species has a fleshy root that should be carefully handled during repotting. It is slow in growth, and the best specimens form tightly compacted whorls of tubercles. Capable of forming moderate sized clumps with time. It should be grown in a mix that is rich in limestone.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 261.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 441.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria schumannii

  • First description by Hildmann, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 1: 125 (1891)

  • Body: Commonly forming clumps. Stems globose, usually gray-green, sometimes with violet tint, 2 – 4 cm (0.8 – 1.6 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Short, thick, four-angled basally.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 9 – 15, thin, needle-like, white with dark tips, 6 – 12 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: Usually 1, sometimes 2 – 4, stout, pure white to dark brown, 10 – 15 mm (0.4 – 0.6 in) long, one usually hooked.
  • Flower: Rose pink, 30 – 40 mm, (1.2 – 1.6 in) in diameter; floral tubes short.
  • Fruit: Nearly dry, scarlet, breaking off just above the base, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Baja California Sur, Mexico. Altitude 10 – 200 m.
  • Comments: A low growing species that will form clumps with time. Water should be withheld in preparation for winter?s low temperatures. May be damaged if in direct sunlight, and a very fast draining soil is required. This species will flower when quite small.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 264.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 442.
  • Synonymes:
    Bartschella schumanii

    M. schumanii var globosa

    M. venusta

Mammillaria schwarzii

  • First description by Shurly, Cact. Succ. J. (GB)11(1): 17 (1949)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters. Stems globose, to 3 cm (1.2 in) high and 3.5 cm (1.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: Up to 12 white thin bristles to 5 mm long.
  • Radial spine: 35 – 40, hairlike, shiny white.
  • Central spine: 8 – 9, white with darker tips, 5 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long, one erect and either straight or hooked, others surrounding it.
  • Flower: White with red midveins, to 5 mm (0.6 in) long and 12 mm (0.5 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Mexico. Altitude 2.150 – 2.400 m.
  • Comments: Reputedly a hard species to grow for any length of time, a very careful hand with watering will reward the grower with a mound of many small heads forming an irregular pile. Care with overhead watering is needed, as the spines will trap water. Extra gritty soil will provide the rapid drainage that is needed. Especially high levels of light will encourage formation of dense spination.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 266.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 442.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria scrippsiana

  • First description by (Britton & Rose) Orcutt, Cactography 8 (1926)

  • Body: Plants solitary, sometimes clustering. Stems globose to short cylindrical, blue-green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Firm, nearly oval.
  • Axil: Very woolly.
  • Radial spine: 8 – 10, slender, bristle-like, pink with reddish tips, to 7 mm (0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: Usually 2, brown, slightly divergent, 5 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Wide funnelform, pinkish yellow to deep purplish pink, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, whitish pink to red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Jalisco, Nayarit, Durango and Zacatecas, Mexico. Altitude 900 – 2.000 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 267.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 442.
  • Synonymes:
    M. pseudoscrippsiana

    M. pseudoscrippsiana var rooksbyana

    M. scrippsiana var autlanensis

    M. scrippsiana var pseudoscrippsiana

    M. scrippsiana var rooksbyana

Mammillaria sempervivi

  • First description by De Candolle, Mem. Mus. Hist. Nat. Paris 17: 114 (1828)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later forming clumps and not rising much above ground level. Stems flattened globose to depressed globose, dull gray-green, 7 – 10 cm (2.8 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Taproots large.
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Pyramidal, firm.
  • Axil: Woolly.
  • Radial spine: Usually on young stems only, 2 – 6, white, bristle-like, to 3 mm long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 3, short, stout, reddish brown to black, becoming gray with age, to 4 mm long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, barely rising above the tubercules, dingy white to pale yellow, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club-shaped, red, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, Guanajuato and Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 2.250 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 268.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 442.
  • Synonymes:
    M. caput-medusae

Mammillaria senilis

  • First description by Salm-Dyck, Cact. Hort. Dyck. 1849: 8,82 (1850)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters. Stems globose to cylindrical, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high and 10 cm (3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical, obtuse.
  • Axil: With wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 40, thinner than the centrals, white, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 6, white with yellow tips, upper and lower ones hooked.
  • Flower: Orange red, 60 – 70 mm (2.4 – 2.8 in) long, 55 – 60 mm (2.2 – 2.4 in) in diameter; floral tubes slender, scaly, to 4 cm long.
  • Fruit: Silvery red to greenish white.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua, Jalisco and Sinaloa, Mexico. Altitude 2.400 – 2.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 269.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 443.
  • Synonymes:
    Mamillopsis diguetii

    Mamillopsis senilis

    Mammillaria diguetii

    M. senilis var diguetii

Mammillaria sheldonii

  • First description by Britton & Rose, The Cact. 4: 156 (1923)

  • Body: Plants branching basally to form clumps. Stems slender cylindrical, dull green, often becoming reddish, 8 – 20 cm (3.1 – 7.9 in) high, to 6 cm (2.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical, four-sided basally, keeled.
  • Axil: Without wool, but sometimes with a few bristles.
  • Radial spine: 9 – 24 with 1 – 2 placed subcentrally, white with dark tips, 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, stout, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long, lower one elongated and either straight or hooked.
  • Flower: Often open several days, wide funnelform, light purplish pink with pale margins to nearly white, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, pale scarlet, 25 – 30 mm (1 – 1.2 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua and Sonora, Mexico. Altitude up to 1.200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 271.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 442.
  • Synonymes:
    M. alamensis

    M. gueldemanniana

    M. guirocobensis

    M. inae / iniae

    M. marnierana

    M. swinglei

    M. swinglei var diabloa

Mammillaria sinistrohamata

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt.-Ges. 4: 162 (1932)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globose, to 4.5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: About 20, smooth,white, 8 – 10 mm long.
  • Central spine: 4, the lowest hooked, to 14 mm long, others straight, pale yellow, about 10 mm long.
  • Flower: Greenish cream with soft-green midstripe, 15 mm long and in diameter, stigmas whitish.
  • Fruit: Red
  • Seed: Black
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Zacatecas, Mexico
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 272.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family referred to M. mercadensis
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria solisioides

  • First description by Backeberg, Cactus (Paris) no.31, suppl.3 (1952)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, occasionally forming small clumps. Stems globose to depressed cylindrical, 2 – 4 cm (0.8 – 1.6 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Short conical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: About 25, flexible, chalky or dirty white, pectinately arranged and flattened against the stem surface, to 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Yellow to yellowish white, to 14 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Fruit: Greenish, half-retained within the plant, barely protuding above the spines.
  • Seed: Large, black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca and Puebla, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 1.400 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 273.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 443.
  • Synonymes:
    M. pectinifera fa solisioides

Mammillaria sonorensis

  • First description by Craig, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 12(10): 155 (1940)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later forming large mounds. Stems flattened globose, dull blue-green, 6 – 8 cm (2.4 – 3.1 in) or more in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8; 8 – 13; also 10 – 16
  • Tubercule: Globose quadrangular, not sharp angled, keeled, firm.
  • Axil: Woolly, but with only occasional brisles.
  • Radial spine: 8 – 15, slender, needle-like, whitish to cream, with brownish tips, 1 – 20 mm (to 0.8 in) long, upper ones shortest.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, awl- to needle-like, reddish brown, 5 – 45 mm (0.2 – 1.8 in) long.
  • Flower: Deep pink with darker midveins, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, scarlet, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 500 – 1.200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 274.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 443.
  • Synonymes:
    M. bellisiana

    M. craigii

    M. movensis

    M. sonorensis var brevispina

    M. sonorensis var gentryi

    M. sonorensis var hiltonii

    M. sonorensis var longispina

    M. sonorensis var maccartyi

    M. tesopacensis

Mammillaria sphacelata ssp sphacelata

  • First description by Martius, Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. 16(1): 339 (1832)

  • Body: Plants commonly clustering, often forming mounds to 50 cm (20 in) or more wide. Stems cylindrical, bright green, about 20 cm high, 2 – 3 cm (0.8 – 1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly, or naked.
  • Radial spine: (8 to) 11 – 14, ivory to chalky white, with tips speckled reddish or blackish, 5 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: (1 to) 3 or 4, ivory to chalky white, with tips speckled reddish, or blackish, straight, 4 – 8 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Flower: Not opening widely, carmine to dark purplish red, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long. Stigmas yellowish green.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, slightly curved, scarlet.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla, Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 700 – 2.400 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 275.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 444.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria sphacelata ssp viperina

  • First description by J. Purpus, Monasschr. Kakt. Kunde 22: 148 (1912)

  • Body: Plants commonly clustering, forming sprawling clumps to 60 cm or more across in the wild. Stems cylindrical, bright green, about 20 – 30 cm high, no more than about 2 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 3 – 5
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly and sometimes with fine, white bristles.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 24
  • Central spine: 6 – 10, glassy white with darker tips, lying close to the stem.
  • Flower: Not opening widely, carmine to dark purplish red, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long. Stigmas yellowish green.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, slightly curved, scarlet.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla, Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 500 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 276.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 444.
  • Synonymes:
    M. viperina

Mammillaria sphaerica

  • First description by A. Dietrich, Allg. Gartenz. 21: 94 (1853)

  • Body: Plants forming flat clusters, often to 50 cm (20 in) wide. Stems subglobose, to 5 cm (2in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Thick taproot.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical to cylindrical, flabby.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly.
  • Radial spine: 12 – 14, needle like, straight, witish to pale yellow, 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in long.
  • Central spine: 1, yellowish, straight, 3 – 6 mm (to 0.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Bright lemon yellow, 6 – 7 cm (2.4 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Greenish to purplish, with pleasant odor.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): July
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Southeast Texas, south into Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 100 – 1.000 m.
  • Comments: Spider mites are especially attracted to this species, but often are controlled with overhead watering. Care with repotting is needed, as the thick taproot is easily damaged. Average levels of light are sufficient to induce flowering. Flowers are readily produced, and the plant easily clusters to form mounds.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 277.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 444.
  • Synonymes:
    M. longimamma var sphaerica

    Dolichothele sphaerica

Mammillaria spinosissima ssp pilcayensis

  • First description by Bravo, A; Inst. Biol. Mex. 28: 37(1958)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems cylindrical, dark blue-green, up to 50 cm in lenght, 4 – 5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: May have some latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Ovate conical, four-sided basally.
  • Axil: Woolly and with 8 – 10 slender bristles..
  • Radial spine: 17, similar to the centrals.
  • Central spine: 17, thin, needle-like, translucent greyish white or yellow, sometimes brown tipped, 5 – 6 mm long.
  • Flower: Purplish, about 2 cm long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Dull purplish red or greenish.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guerrero, Mexico. Altitude 600 – 1.500 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 279.
    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 444.
  • Synonymes:
    M. pilcayensis

    M. pitcayensis

Mammillaria spinosissima ssp spinosissima

  • First description by Lemaire, Cact. Aliq. Nov. 4 (1838)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems cylindrical, dark blue-green, rarely exceeding 30 cm in height, 6 – 7 cm ( 2.4 – 2.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Ovate conical, four-sided basally.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 25, white, bristle-like, 4 – 6 mm long.
  • Central spine: 12 – 15, dark pink, stronger than the radials and thicker at the base, straight, 10 – 12 mm long.
  • Flower: Purplish, 12 mm long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Purplish red or greenish.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Morelos, Guerrero and Mexico, Mexico. Altitude 1.600 – 1.900 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 278.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 444.
  • Synonymes:
    M. centraliplumosa

    M. centraliplumosa var gracilis

    M. gasterantha

    M. haasii

    M. kladiwae Hort

    M. virginis

Mammillaria spinosissima ssp tepoxtlana

  • First description by Ehrenberg, Allg. Gartenz. 17: 295 (1849) – as M. auricoma

  • Body: Plants clustering. Stems cylindrical, to 50 cm long, 9 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Ovate conical, four-sided basally.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly.
  • Radial spine: 10 – 15, thin, needle-like, straight, straw yellow, 4 – 18 mm long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 6, a little thicker than the radials, straight, thicker at the base, glassy-yellow, often with brown tips, 6 – 30 mm long.
  • Flower: Carmine pink, funnel-shaped, 2 – 2.5 cm long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Greenish to brownish red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Morelos, Mexico. Altitude 1.150 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 280.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 445.
  • Synonymes:
    M. auricoma

    M. crassior

Mammillaria standleyi

  • First description by Britton & Rose, The Cact. 4: 97(1923)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, but at times forming large clumps. Stems globose, pale green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Firm, conical, keeld.
  • Axil: With wool when young, later with 5 – 7 white bristles.
  • Radial spine: About 16, slightly spreading, white with darker tips, 4 – 8 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4, reddish-brown, erect, 5 – 9 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, purplish red, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, scarlet, 12 – 16 mm (0.5 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Chihuahua, Sinaloa, *Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 500 – 1.750 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 281.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 445.
  • Synonymes:
    M. hertrichiana

    M. xanthina (?)

Mammillaria stella-de-tacubaya

  • First description by Heese, Gartenflora 53: 214 (1904)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems globose, grayish green, 4 – 5 cm (1.6 – 2 in) high, 4 – 6 cm (1.6 – 2.4 in) in diameter, obscured by white spines.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Short cylindrical, rounded apically.
  • Axil: Sparsely woolly.
  • Radial spine: 35 – 60, white, interlacing, flattened against the stem surface, bristle-like, 3 – 7 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, often absent, hooked, whitish with dark tip, 4 – 11 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Reddish white to greenish white, with reddish brown midveins, to 15 m (0.6 in) long.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, brownish red, 9 – 15 mm(0.4 – 0.6 in) long.
  • Seed: Brownish black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Durango, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 2.300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 282.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 445.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria supertexta

  • First description by Martius ex Pfeiffer, Enum. Cact. 25 (1837)

  • Body: Plants solitary at first, later branching basally and from the sides to form clumps. Stems subglobose to oblong, green, 10 – 13 cm (3.9 – 5.1 in) high, 8 – 10 cm (3.1 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Small, crowded, conical.
  • Axil: Very woolly, nearly covering the tubercules.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 18, slender, chalky white, lower ones longest, to 5 mm.
  • Central spine: 2, white with brown tips, to 3 mm long.
  • Flower: Small, purplish red.
  • Fruit: Not known.
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 400 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 284.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 446.
  • Synonymes:
    M. lanata

    M. martinezii

Mammillaria surculosa

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt.-Ges. 3: 78 (1931)

  • Body: Plants solitary or forming clusters. Stems globose, dark green, to 3 cm (1.2 in) high and 2 cm (0.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Taproots stout.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule: Tapering cylindrical, flabby, rounded apically.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: About 15, white, 8 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, hooked, needle-like, amber yellow with dark tip, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long.
  • Flower: Funnelform, sulpher yellow, sweetly scented, to 18 mm (0.7 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Green to greenish brown.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -2? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 1.200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 285.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 446.
  • Synonymes:
    Dolichothele surculosa

Mammillaria tayloriorum

  • First description by Glass & Foster, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 47(4): 173 (1975)

  • Body: Plants solitary, then branching from the sides and bases to form clumps. Stems globose to thick cylindrical, pale green, to 25 cm (9.8 in) or more high, 10 – 11 cm (3.9 – 4.3 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Pyramidal.
  • Axil: Very woolly at first, later sparsely woolly and with a few bristles.
  • Radial spine: 12, slightly curved, orange-brown when young, later white with brown tips, to 9 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 5, similar to the radials.
  • Flower: Urn shaped, cherry colored with whitish margins, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: San Pedro Nolasco Island, Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 286.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 446.
  • Synonymes:
    M. nolascana nom. nud.

Mammillaria tepexicensis

  • First description by Meyran, Cact. Suc. Mex. 36(3): 62-64,72 (1991)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems globose, dark green, 2 – 3 cm (0.8 – 1.2 in) high and in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 27 – 30, stiff to somewhat flexible, straight to slightly curved, white, 5 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4 – 5, occasionally up to 8, hooked, needle-like, yellow with reddish brown tips, flexible, 4 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Pale pink with pinkish purple midveins, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Globose, thin walled, embedded firmly between the tubercules.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 1.900 – 2.200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 287.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 446.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria tetrancistra

  • First description by Engelmann, Amer. J. Sci. ser. 2, 14: 337 (1852)

  • Body: Plants solitary or forming clumps. Stems cylindrical to ovoid, pale green to gray, to 25 cm (9.8 in) high, 3 – 8 cm (1.2 – 3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Tuberous.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: With bristles.
  • Radial spine: 30 – 60, intwo series, the inner hairlike and white, the outer stouter and white with dark tips, 6 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 3 – 4, needle-like, brown or black, 14 – 25 mm (0.6 – 1 in) long, straight or the lowermost one or more hooked.
  • Flower: Lavender edged with white, to 25 mm (1 in) long, 25 – 35 mm (1 – 1.4 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Seed: Dome shaped, black, pitted, with distinctive corky appendages.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: California, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, USA and northern Baja California, Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 200 – 500 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography: J
    ohn Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 288.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 446.
  • Synonymes:
    M. phellosperma

    Phellosperma tetrancistra

Mammillaria tezontle

  • First description by Fitz Maurice, Cact. Suc. Mex. 40(3): 59 (1995)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed globose, 10 mm high, 15 – 20 mm in diameter.
  • Roots: Thick fibrous.
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With wool and occasionally bristles.
  • Radial spine: 14 – 20, yellowish white, pubescent, 3 – 5 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 4, one or more hooked, yellowish white, pubescent, 3 – 4 mm long.
  • Flower: Yellowish white, 10 mm long, 15 mm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Green.
  • Seed: Blackish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Tezontle, lava frost.
  • Geographic Distribution: San Luis Potosi, Mexico.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 289.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – referred to M. crinita
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria theresae

  • First description by Cutak, Cact. Succ. J. (US) 39(6): 239 (1967)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary, sometimes clustering. Stems subglobose to cylindrical, olive green, sometimes with purplish tint, to 4 cm (1.6 in) high, 1 – 3 cm (0.4 – 1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Taproots stout.
  • Sap: without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: sparesely woolly.
  • Radial spine: 22 – 30, plumose, translucent, white to yellowish white, to 2 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Funnelform, violet-purple, 35 – 45 mm (1.4 – 1.8 in) long, to 30 mm (1.2 in) in diameter. Stigmas pale yellow.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, remaining embedded in the body, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe): April, May.
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Durango, Mexico. Altitude 2.150 to 2.300 m.
  • Comments: In culture, mineral substrate.
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 290.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 447.
  • Synonymes:
    M. saboae var theresa

Mammillaria thornberi ssp thornberi

  • First description by Orcutt, West Amer. Sci. 12: 162 (1902)

  • Body: Plants commonly forming dense clusters. Stems slender cylindrical, tapered basally, often dull purplish green, 5 – 10 cm (2 – 3.9 in) high, to 2.5 cm (1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule: Slightly flabby, conical to cylindrical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 15 – 20, white or yellowish, with dark tips, 5 – 9 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long, not distinctly pubescent.
  • Central spine: 1, hooked, pale to dark reddish brown, 9 – 18 mm (0.4 – 0.7 in) long.
  • Flower: Broadly funnelform, purplish to lavender pink, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) wide.
  • Fruit: Promonent, fat, red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 291.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 447.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria thornberi ssp yaquensis

  • First description by Craig, Mamm. Handb. 320 (1945)

  • Body: Plants clustering freely, joints easily detached from the body. Stems slender cylindrical, to 70 mm high, to 15 mm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule: Flabby, purplish green, short conical.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly.
  • Radial spine: 18, cream coloured tipped light brown, 5 – 6 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1, hooked, pale to dark reddish brown, 7 mm long.
  • Flower: Witish pink with pink midstripe, 2 cm long and in diameter, stigmas purple-red.
  • Fruit: Scarlet
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Sonora, Mexico. Altitude 10 – 100 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 292.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 447.
  • Synonymes:
    M. yaquiensis

Mammillaria tonalensis

  • First description by Hunt, Cact. Succ. J. (GB) 41(4): 103 (1979)

  • Body: Plants freely clustering from offsets. Stems erect or sprawling, slender, cylindrical, light green, to 12 cm (4.7 in) or more high, 2 – 3.5 cm (0.8 – 1.4 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Fibrous.
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Obtusely conical.
  • Axil: Naked or slightly woolly.
  • Radial spine: 9 – 12, needle-like, straight, chalky white with brown tips, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, hooked, chestnut brown, becoming dark with age, to 18 mm (0.7 in) long.
  • Flower: Carmine with whitish margins, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long, 10 – 12 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Bright red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 1.400 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 293.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 447.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria uncinata

  • First description by Zuccarini ex Pfeiffer, Enum. Cact. 34 (1837)

  • Body: Plants solitary or occasionally clustering. Stems flattened globose, dark blue-green, 6 – 10 cm (2.4 – 3.9 in) high, 8 – 10 cm (3.1 – 3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Woolly at first, later naked.
  • Radial spine: 3 – 6, upper ones shorter and stronger, straight or slightly curved, pinkish to grayish white, 5 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, hooked, pinkish gray to dark purplish brown, with dark tips, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Yellowish or white, with brownish midveins, 15 – 20 mm (0.6 – 0.8 in) long, to 15 mm (0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, purplish red, 10 – 18 mm (0.4 – 0.7 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -4? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Occuring widely in Hidalgo, San Luis Potosi, Mexico, Morelos, Puebla, Oaxaca, Guerrero, Durango, Queretaro, Guanajuato, Zacatecas, Aguascalients, Michoacan and Jalisco, Mexico. Altitude 1.500 – 2.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 294.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 447.
  • Synonymes:
    M. uncinata var bihamata

Mammillaria varieaculeata

  • First description by Buchenau, Cact. Suc. Mex. 11(4): 79 (1966)

  • Body: Plants forming clusters from offsets, sometimes dividing dichotomously. Stems globose to cylindrical, green to dark green, to 13 cm (5.1 in) or more high and 9 cm (3.5 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Pyramidal.
  • Axil: With 10 – 25 white bristles, 4 – 8 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Radial spine: 17 – 24, white, yellowish brown basally, later dark brown, 4 – 8 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 5, fewer with age, needle-like, light brown, becoming darker with age, 5 – 10 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) at first, later to 25 mm (1 in) long.
  • Flower: Red, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, scarlet.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Puebla, Mexico. Altitude 1.300 – 1.400 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 296.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 448.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria vetula ssp gracilis

  • First description by Pfeiffer, Allg. Gartenz. 6: 275 (1838)

  • Body: Plants proliferous, the offsets very easily detached. Stems cylindrical, to 13 cm long, 1 – 3 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 11 – 16, bristle-like, 3 – 8 mm long, chalky white.
  • Central spine: Absent, or up to 5 in maturity, to 10 – 12 mm long, stronger than the radials, white or dark brown.
  • Flower: Small, about 12 mm long and in diameter, pale yellow with pinkish or brownish midstripe.
  • Fruit: Small, red or pinkish white.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -8? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.200 – 1.850 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 298.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 448.
  • Synonymes:
    M. gracilis

    M. gracilis var pulchella

    M. fragilis

Mammillaria vetula ssp vetula

  • First description by Martius, Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. 16(1): 338 (1832)

  • Body: Plants freely clustering to form flat-topped mounds. Stems globose to cylindrical, glossy blue-green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Firm to slightly flabby, bluntly conical, sour-sided basally.
  • Axil: Slightly woolly or naked.
  • Radial spine: At least 25 at first, later up to 50, white, thin, straight, needle-like, 3 – 10 mm (to 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, reddish brown, straight, stout, needle-like, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Yellow lemon, to 15 mm (0.6 in) or more long. Stigmas white or orange-yellow.
  • Fruit: Dull pink.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Guanajuato, Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.600 – 3.350 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 297.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 448.
  • Synonymes:
    M. kuentziana

    M. magneticola

Mammillaria voburnensis ssp eichlamii

  • First description by Quehl, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 18: 65 (1908)

  • Body: Plants clustering. Stems cylindrical to subclavate (about 5 – 7 cm in diameter in cultivation).
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: With white bristles and persistent yellowish wool.
  • Radial spine: 6, straight, needle-like, yellowish white with darker tip, 5 – 7 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1, yellow at base, brownish red in upper half, 10 mm long.
  • Flower: Yellow, the outer segments with brownish midstripe, 2 cm long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Dark red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Honduras and Chiapas, Mexico. Altitude 350 – 600 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 300.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 448.
  • Synonymes:
    M. eichlamii

    M. voburnensis var eichlamii

Mammillaria voburnensis ssp voburnensis

  • First description by Scheer, London J. Bot. 4: 136 (1845)

  • Body: Plants forming large clumps to 30 cm (12 in) high and wide. Stems cylindrical, dark green with reddish tint, to 5 cm (2 in) high and 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Short, sub-ovate, angled above, round below.
  • Axil: With wool and bristles.
  • Radial spine: Up to 9, nearly equal, lower 4 slightly longer, ivory white, to 4 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 2, rigid, straight, awl shaped, brown at first, later ivory with spots, to 12 mm (0.5 in) long.
  • Flower: Off-white to yellow with red-brown midstripe.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guatamala and Chiapas, Oaxaca, Mexico. Altitude 50 – 500 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 299.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 448.
  • Synonymes:
    M. felicis

    M. voburnensis var quetzalcoatl

    M. woburnensis

Mammillaria wagneriana

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt.-Ges. 4: 199 (1932)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globose to depressed globose, dark green, to 15 cm (5.9 in) high and 20 cm (7.9 in)in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Short pyramidal, quadrangular.
  • Axil: With dense wool but no bristles.
  • Radial spine: 9 – 10, whitish yellow with brown tips, unequal, upper 2 – 3 to 7 mm (0.3 in) long, lateral ones twice as longn lower ones three times as long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, variable, straight and 20 mm (0.8 in) long or twisted and 50 mm (2 in) long, reddish horn colour.
  • Flower: Dirty white with pale pink midveins and tips, to 15 mm (0.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Zacatecas, Jalisco, Aguascalientes, Mexico. Altitude 1.700 – 2.300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 301.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 448.
  • Synonymes:
    M. antesbergeriana (?)

    M. crassa

    M. wagneriana var tortulospina

Mammillaria weingartiana

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt.-Ges. 4: 199 (1932)

  • Body: Plants solitary or forming clusters. Stems globose, tuberous below, dark green, slightly glossy, 4 – 5 cm (1.6 – 2 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule: Slender conical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 25, white, 6 – 8 mm (0.2 – 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 at first, hooked, later 2 – 3, straight, dark reddish brown, to 12 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Pale greenish yellow to creamy yellow, with pinkish brown midveins, with fringed margins, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Fruit: Small, club shaped, red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Altitude 2.000 – 2.300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 302.
    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus
    Family – page 449.
  • Synonymes:
    M. unihamata

Mammillaria wiesingeri ssp apamensis

  • First description by Reppenhagen, Gatt. Mamm. 71 (1987)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globose, 3 – 9 cm high, 5 – 12 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 13 – 16 (or up to 20), glassy yellow.
  • Central spine: Usually 2, sometimes only 1, brown or dark brown, paler below.
  • Flower: Carmine pink, similar to the type.
  • Fruit:
  • Seed:
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Mexico. Altitude 2.200 – 2.650 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 304.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 449.
  • Synonymes:
    M. apamensis

    M. apamensis var pratensis

    M. mundtii

Mammillaria wiesingeri ssp wiesingeri

  • First description by Boedeker, Kakteenk. 1933: 204 (1933)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed globose, dull green, to 4 cm (1.6 in) high, 8 cm (3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots: Thick.
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 16 – 26
  • Tubercule: Slender pyramidal, flabby, weakly angled.
  • Axil: Naked or with occasional bristles.
  • Radial spine: 18 – 20, very thin, needle-like, glassy white, 5 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 4 or more, straight, reddish brown, 5 to 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Flower: Clear carmine red, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long and in diameter. Stigmas white.
  • Fruit: Slender, club shaped, carmine red, to 10 mm (0.4 in) long.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Hidalgo, Mexico, Mexico. Altitude 2.000 – 3.000 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 303.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 449.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria winterae ssp aramberri

  • First description by Hunt, Bradleya 5: 41-42 (1987)

  • Body: Plants clustering. Stems flattish globose, blue green, 20 – 30 cm (7.9 – 12 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Large pyramidal, clearly faceted.
  • Axil: Naked or with a small tuft of wool.
  • Radial spine: Absent.
  • Central spine: 4 – 6, needle-like, brownish with darker tips, usually 4 radially placed, with the two extra spines when present more central, and slightly longer.
  • Flower: Pale yellow with white brownish midstripe, about 3 cm long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Dark red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Limestone hills
  • Geographic Distribution: Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Altitude 900 – 1.300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 306.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 449.
  • Synonymes:
    M. crassimammillis

Mammillaria winterae ssp winterae

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt-.-Ges. 1: 119 (1929)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed globose, light green to blue green, 20 – 30 cm (7.9 – 12 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Four-angled, keeled.
  • Axil: Naked at first, later densely white woolly but without bristles.
  • Radial spine: Absent.
  • Central spine: 4, stout, needle-like, straight or slightly curved, pale gray or slightly reddish, with brown tips, upper and lower to 30 mm (1.2 in) long, laterals to 15 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: Yellowish white with sulfur yellow midveins, outer petals brownish red with broad yellowish white margins, to 30 mm (1.2 in) long and 25 mm (1 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Club shaped, pale red.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -10? C.
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, Mexico. Altitude 1.140 – 2.500 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 305.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 449.
  • Synonymes:
    M. freudenbergeri

    M. zahniana

Mammillaria wrightii ssp wilcoxii

  • First description by Toumey ex Schumann, Gesamtb. Kakt. 545 (1898)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems depressed, short-cylindrical, about 5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8, also 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 14 – 16, thin, white, to 10 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1, hooked, stronger than the radials, brown, paler below.
  • Flower: Vivid purple, or white, to 35 mm long and 30 mm in diameter.
  • Fruit: Greenish or brownish, smaller as the type.
  • Seed: Black or blackish brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: New Mexico, Arizona, USA and Sonora, Chihuahua, Mexico. Altitude 1.200 – 2.300 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 308.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 450.
  • Synonymes:
    M. meridiorosei

    M. wilcoxii

    M. wilcoxii var wolfii

    M. wrightii var wilcoxii

    M. wrightii var wolfii

Mammillaria wrightii ssp wrightii

  • First description by Engelmann & Bigelow, Re. Pacific Railr. 4: 27 (1856)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems flattened globose to short cylindrical, dark green, 3 – 8 cm (1.2 – 3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 8 – 13
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: Up to 12, whitish, upper ones a little longer and dark tipped, 8 – 12 mm (0.3 – 0.5 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1 – 3, hooked, dark, 10 – 12 mm (0.4 – 0.5 in) long.
  • Flower: Bright purple, to 25 mm (1 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Ovate globose, purplish, to 25 mm (1 in) long.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: New Mexico, Arizona, USA and Sonora, Chihuahua, Mexico. Altitude 1.000 – 1.800 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 307.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 449.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria xaltianguensis ssp bambusiphila

  • First description by Reppenhagen, Mitt. Arbeitsk. Mammillarienfr. 10(5): 161 (1986)

  • Body: Plants solitary. Stems cylindrical, 5 – 20 cm high, 4 – 8 cm in diameter (heavily clustering in cultivation).
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked or with a little wool.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 20, straight, fine bristle-like, 3 – 5 mm long, the upper spines the shorter, glassy white, with brown at the base and the tips.
  • Central spine: 3 – 5, straight, the lower longer, glassy white or pale brown, black at the tips, 5 – 11 mm long.
  • Flower: Carmine, 15 – 17 mm long, 5 – 7 mm in diameter, narowly opening.
  • Fruit: Reddish brown or greenish.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Michoacan, Mexico. Altitude 800 – 1.200 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 310.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 450.
  • Synonymes:
    M. bambusiphila

    M. bambusiphila var parva

Mammillaria xaltianguensis ssp xaltianguensis

  • First description by Sanchez-Mejorada, An. Inst. Biol. Mex. 44, Bot. sr. (1): 30 (1975)

  • Body: Plants solitary or forming clumps. Stems cylindrical, green, to 20 cm (7.9 in) high, 7 – 8 cm (2.8 – 3.1 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex in the stem but not in the tubercules.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Slightly four-angled.
  • Axil: With sparse wool and a few bristles, 8 – 12 mm (0.3 – 0.5 in) long, or naked.
  • Radial spine: 16 – 20, bristle-like, translucent white, 5 – 6 mm (0.2 in) long.
  • Central spine: 2 – 4, occasionally hooked, needle-like, purplish brown to yellowish brown, with reddish tips, later whitish, the upper 7 – 8 mm long, the lowest 8 – 12 mm long.
  • Flower: Pale pinkish below, very light green above, outer segments greenish cream below, pale reddish above with creamy margins, to 12 mm long.
  • Fruit: Green, becoming yellow above.
  • Seed: Brown.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guerrero, Michoacan, Mexico. Altitude 500 – 850 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 309.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 450.
  • Synonymes:
    M. xaltianguensis var aguilensis

Mammillaria zeilmanniana

  • First description by Boedeker, Monatsschr. Deutsche Kakt.-Ges. 3: 227 (1931)

  • Body: Plants solitary or clustering. Stems 6 cm high, 4.5 cm indiameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement: 13 – 21
  • Tubercule:
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: About 15 – 18, finely bristly, white, pubescent.
  • Central spine: 4, the upper 3 straight, the lowest hooked, slightly longer than the radials, reddish brown.
  • Flower: To 2 cm, pinkish violet or purple, stigmas yellowish.
  • Fruit: Whitish green to pale pink.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Mexico. Altitude 1.950 m.
  • Comments: The white flowered sport of M. zeilmanniana is produced in cultivation and not known to occur in the wild.a
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 311.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – referred to M. crinita
  • Synonymes:
    M. crinita ssp zeilmanniana

Mammillaria zephyranthoides

  • First description by Scheidweiler, Allg. Gartenz. 9: 41 (1841)

  • Body: Plants usually solitary. Stems flattened globose, dark blue-green, to 8 cm (3.1 in) high and 10 cm (3.9 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement: 5 – 8
  • Tubercule: Soft, conical, rounded apically, to 25 mm (1 in) long.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 12 – 18, very slender, white, 8 – 10 mm (0.3 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Central spine: 1, hooked, white to yellowish to reddish brown, short or to 14 mm (0.6 in) long.
  • Flower: White with pink midveins, to 40 mm (1.6 in) in diameter.
  • Fruit: Ovoid, red.
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Oaxaca, Puebla, Hidalgo, Queretaro, Mexico. Altitude 1.800 – 2.400 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 313.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 450.
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria zublerae

  • First description by Reppenhagen, Gatt. Mamm. 48 (1987)

  • Body: Plants commonly branching to form large clusters. Stems globose to cylindrical to club shaped, green, 2 – 5 cm (0.8 – 2 in) high, 2 – 4.5 cm (0.8 – 1.8 in) in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Without latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Cylindrical to conical, soft.
  • Axil: With yellowish wool.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 24, fine, bristle-like, straight or curving, white with yellowish tips, 4 – 7 mm (to 0.3 in) long.
  • Central spine: 5 – 6, slender, needle-like, straight, pubescent, glassy yellow, 5 – 9 mm (0.2 – 0.4 in) long.
  • Flower: Clear yellow, to 15 mm (0.6 in) long and in diameter.
  • Fruit: Bright red
  • Seed: Black.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate:
  • Geographic Distribution: Tamaulipas, Mexico. Altitude 1.500 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography:
    John Pilbeam (1999) – Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook – page 314.

    Edward F. Anderson (2001) – The Cactus Family – page 450.
  • Synonymes:
    M. prolifera ssp zublerae

Mammillaria vetula ssp lacostei

  • First description by PLEIN & WEBER ssp nova

    MART. ssp lacostei

    MAfM 27(4): 203-212 (2003)

  • Body: Stems cylindrical, to 13 cm long, 1 – 3 cm in diameter. Strongly offsetting, forming large clumps, heads oblong, bright greenish, in the lower part greenish-yellow, to 6 cm long and 3 cm in diameter.
  • Roots: 4 mm wide, conical to nearly cylindrically, 6 mm long, at the point rounded.
  • Sap:
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: 2 mm in diameter, somewhat inclined, with whitish-yellow wool, later naked.
  • Axil: Naked.
  • Radial spine: 20 – 22, irregularly radiating, somewhat protuding, into one another interweave, to 7 mm long, glassily, straight, needle-like.
  • Central spine: 6 – 8, usually 8, pointing upwards, to 11 mm long, stronger than the radials, straight, needle-like, amber coloured, to the base dark brown
  • Flower: Small, about 15 mm long and 10 mm in diameter, whitish cream with greenish midstripe.
  • Fruit: Red, club-shped, to 15 mm long, to 4 mm in diameter.
  • Seed: Black, 1,2 mm long.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: -8? C.
  • Habitat Substrate: Lime plates.
  • Geographic Distribution: Guanajuato, Mexico. Altitude 1.800 – 1.950 m.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography: AfM journal (4) 2003
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria saboae ssp roczekii

  • First description by Rischer & Kr?ger – MafM 27(2): 50 – 58 2003

  • Body: Plants solitary, rarely clustering from base, flattened globose, oblong, to 10 – 15 mm long and to 35 mm wide.
  • Roots: Taproot, 15 – 50 mm long and 35 mm in diameter.
  • Sap: Without latex
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical, dark green, widely separated, rounded at the top, somewhat soft, 5 mm wide, 7 – 9 mm long.
  • Axil: With wome short bristles
  • Radial spine: 19 – 25, mostly 24, glassy white, interlacing, smooth, 3 – 4 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Funnelform, violet-pink, 35 – 50 mm long, 30 – 40 mm wide, stigmas yellow.
  • Fruit: Ripens in the body, brownish, 4 – 5 mm wide and long.
  • Seed: Black, 1,2 mm long and 1 mm wide.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Volcanic rocks with sandy humus soil.
  • Geographic Distribution: Durango, Mexico – near Canatlan.
  • Comments:
  • Bibliography: MafM 27(2): 50 – 58 (2003)
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria roemeri spec. nov.

  • First description by Kr?ger & Rischer – MafM 26(2): 96 – 102 (2002)

  • Body: Depressed globose, sunken apically, solitary or clumping, 10 – 20 mm high and to 35 mm in diameter.
  • Roots: Taproot, 10 cm long.
  • Sap: Without latex
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical, somewhat soft, dark green to brownish green, 3 – 4 mm long, 2 – 3 mm in diameter.
  • Axil: Naked
  • Radial spine: 25 – 32, radiating, straight or curved, strongly pubescent, glassy white, 1.5 – 2.3 mm long, soft.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Funnelform, 13 – 15 mm long and wide, whitish to cream- colored with green flush. Inner petals with pink midveins on the sepals. Stigmas are yellow.
  • Fruit: Green, 3 – 4 mm long and 3 mm wide.
  • Seed: Black, spherical, 1.1 mm long and 0.95 mm in diameter.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Limestone slabs and fine gravel.
  • Geographic Distribution: Zacatecas, Mexico.
  • Comments: Flowering period in Mexico : November – January.
  • Bibliography: MafM 26(2): 96 – 102 (2002)
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria perezdelarosae ssp andersoniana

  • First description by W.A. & Betty Fitz Maurice, CSJ US Amerika 5:263 – 268 (2001)

  • Body: Plants solitary, stems globose, dark green, to 2 cm high and 2.5 cm in diameter.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: Usually without latex
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical with rounded tips, 2 mm wide and long.
  • Axil: With a little wool
  • Radial spine: 50 – 63, straight, white, pectinately arranged, 2 mm long.
  • Central spine: 1, straight, ascending, dark red, 4 mm long and 0.25 mm wide, dark brown with brownish to yellowish base.
  • Flower: Funnelform, white with pinkish brown midstripes, to 6 mm long and 8 mm wide.
  • Fruit: Green, club shaped, 2 mm long and wide.
  • Seed: Brownish black, with partially lateral hilium, coarsely pitted, 1 mm long and 0.6 mm wide.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature:
  • Habitat Substrate: Volcanic rocks.
  • Geographic Distribution: Zacatecas, Municipio Via Garcia, Mexico. Altitude 2.000 m.
  • Comments: Small population, less than 1000 plants on less than 1000 m2. Critically endangered species.
  • Bibliography: MafM 26(1): 32 – 37 (2002)
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria crucigera var grandinosa

  • First description by Linzen, Rogozinski et F.Wolf, Mitteillungsblatt des AfM 21(4): 207 ? 209 1997.

  • Body: Solitary at first, later clumping, globose to short-cylindrical, somewhat sunken apically, 15 ? 50 mm in diameter and to 100 mm high.
  • Roots:
  • Sap: With latex.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Conical.
  • Axil: With white wool.
  • Radial spine: 18 ? 31, needle-like, comb-shaped, horizontal radiating, 1,5 ? 2,5 mm long, glassy white to white with brownish base.
  • Central spine: Mostly absent, sometimes 2, rudimentary, needle-like, 2 ? 6 mm long, brown to dark brown.
  • Flower: Short funnelform, carmine to pink, 9 ? 10 mm in diameter and 10 ? 12 mm long.
  • Fruit: Stick-shaped, red, 8 ? 12 mm long and 2 ? 3 mm wide.
  • Seed: Club-shaped, pale brown, 0,9 mm long and 0,6 mm wide.
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: 5 ? 10? C.
  • Habitat Substrate: A mixture of brick-dust, sand, loam and gravel.
  • Geographic Distribution:
  • Comments: Very slow growing species. Not easy flowering. this taxon has not yet been accepted as being a valid sub-species, for the moment, its standing is left in doubt.
  • Bibliography: Afm-LBS Lieferung 09/99 LINZEN
  • Synonymes:

Mammillaria paulii sp.nov.

  • First description by Thomas Linzen in Mitteilungsblatt des arbeitskreis f?r mammillarienfreunde 3/2005 134-145.

  • Body: Single, sometimes branching, depressed globose to almost globose, 4 – 8 cm in diameter and 3 – 8 cm high. Shiny dark green.
  • Roots: Thick, pulpous.
  • Sap: With watery sap.
  • Tubercule arrangement:
  • Tubercule: Short cylindrical to conical, truncated top, 1,5 to 2 cm long, 0,8 to 1,2 cm in diameter. Spreading laterally somewhat compressed.
  • Axil: Naked .
  • Radial spine: (7) 9 – 11, thin, acicular, needle like, with darkbrown tip. Almost radiating horizontally, white-yellowish, later becoming greyish, 6 – 16 mm long.
  • Central spine: Absent.
  • Flower: Funnel form, 4 – 5 cm long and 4 – 6 cm in diameter. Sulphur yellow.
  • Fruit: Globose to little oval, 6 – 8 mm in diameter and about 9 mm long, dark green, later becoming green yellowish.
  • Seed: Drop-shaped, 2,0 – 2,3 mm long; 1,5 – 1,8 mm wide, black. Basal to subbasal
  • Flowering period in Cultivation (Europe):
  • Minimum temperature: 5 – 10? C.
  • Habitat Substrate: On meadows with flat, strongly weather beaten lime rocks, in holes and sheltered by grass and moss.
  • Geographic Distribution: Mexico, San Luis Potosi near Mpio, Guadalcazar and Realejo.
  • Comments: Differs from the other species of dolichothele by having only radial spines, rounded form of the buds, building two rows of inner petals, globose fruits, the biggest seed in this group and a very rainy habitat separated from the other species of this series
  • Bibliography: AfM 3/2005
  • Synonymes:

Pictures

Picture in the galery related to the keyword :


Mammillaria Albicans/Mammillaria albicans (syn. M. slevinii) – Photo Keith.jpg


Mammillaria Albicans/Mammillaria albicans – Photo Manfred Stober.jpg


Mammillaria Albicans/Mammillaria albicans – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Albicans/Mammillaria albicans – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Albicans/Mammillaria albicans L 1374 – DH 502-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Albicoma/Mammillaria albicoma – ML 133 – Photo Michel Lacoste .jpg


Mammillaria Albicoma/Mammillaria albicoma – ML 133 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albicoma/Mammillaria albicoma – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Albicoma/Mammillaria albicoma – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Albicoma/Mammillaria albicoma sans aiguillon central DH_523-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Albiflora/Mammillaria albiflora (syn. M. herrerae var albiflora)- Photo Luc .jpg


Mammillaria Albiflora/Mammillaria albiflora (syn. M. herrerae var. albiflora) MG 688-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Albiflora/Mammillaria albiflora – ML 335 – Photo Michel Lacoste .jpg


Mammillaria Albiflora/Mammillaria albiflora – ML 335 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albiflora/Mammillaria albiflora – ML 572 – Photo Michel Lacoste .jpg


Mammillaria Albiflora/Mammillaria albiflora – ML 572 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albiflora/Mammillaria albiflora – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Albiflora/Mammillaria albiflora – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Albiflora/Mammillaria albiflora . ML 572 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp albilanata (syn. M. igualensis) – ML 29 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp albilanata (syn. M. igualensis) – ML 31 – Photo Michel Lacoste .jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp albilanata (syn. M. igualensis) – ML 31 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp albilanata (syn. M. igualensis) – ML29 – ML-00 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp albilanata – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp albilanata – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp albilanata – Photo Murielle Strauss.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. ignota) – ML 270 – Photo Michel Lacoste .jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. ignota) – ML 270 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. ignota) – ML 38 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera v. juxtlahuacensis) – ML 241 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera v. juxtlahuacensis) – ROG363 – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera v. juxtlahuacensis) – TL205 – ML-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera v. juxtlahuacensis)- ML 241 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera) – ML 265 – Photo Michel Lacoste .jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera) – ML 265 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera) – ML 265 – Photo Michel Lacoste 4.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera) – ML 265 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera) – ML 266 – Photo Michel Lacoste 4.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera) – ML 266 – Photo Michel Lacoste 5.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera) – ML 358 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. lanigera) – ML 363 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. monticola) – ML 52 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. monticola) – ML52 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. monticola) – ROG71 – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. monticola) – photo Hugo de cock.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. noureddineana) – ML 261 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. noureddineana) – ML 261 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. noureddineana) – ML 261 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. noureddineana) – ML 369 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. noureddineana) – ML 369 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. noureddineana) – ML261 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp oaxacana (syn. M. nourredineana) Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp reppenhagenii (syn. M. reppenhagenii) – ML 297 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp reppenhagenii (syn. M. reppenhagenii) – ML 297 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp tegelbergiana (syn. M. tegelbergiana) – ML 372 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp tegelbergiana (syn. M. tegelbergiana) – ML 372 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Albilanata/Mammillaria albilanata ssp tegelbergiana – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Amajacensis/Mammillaria amajacensis – ML 46 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Amajacensis/Mammillaria amajacensis – ML 46 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Amajacensis/Mammillaria amajacensis – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Amajacensis/Mammillaria amajacensis – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Angelensis/Mammillaria angelensis – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Angelensis/Mammillaria angelensis – Photo Marc.jpg


Mammillaria Angelensis/Mammillaria angelensis – Photo Luc 2.jpg


Mammillaria Anniana/Mammillaria anniana – DH591-91 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Anniana/Mammillaria anniana – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Anniana/Mammillaria anniana – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Armillata/Mammillaria armillata – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Armillata/Mammillaria armillata (Lau 055 – Mexique – BAJA – San jose del cabo )- Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Armillata/Mammillaria armillata – ML 696 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Armillata/Mammillaria armillata – ML 697 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Armillata/Mammillaria armillata – ML 700 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Armillata/Mammillaria armillata – ML 716 C – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Armillata/Mammillaria armillata – Photo Norman Dennis .jpg


Mammillaria Armillata/Mammillaria armillata – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Armillata/Mammillaria armillata SB1256 – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata – ML 686 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata – ML 686-1 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata – ML 686-2 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata – ML 686-3 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata – Photo Christophe Blanchy 2.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata var alba – DH597-91 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Aureilanata/Mammillaria aureilanata var. alba – ML 95 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Backebergiana/Mammillaria backebergiana – Photo Josef Matousek – forme à fleurs blanches d’origine horticole.jpg


Mammillaria Backebergiana/Mammillaria backebergiana ssp backebergiana – Photo Michael Enzendorfer.jpg


Mammillaria Backebergiana/Mammillaria backebergiana ssp backebergiana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Backebergiana/Mammillaria backebergiana ssp backebergiana – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Backebergiana/Mammillaria backebergiana ssp ernestii – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Backebergiana/Mammillaria backegergiana ssp ernestii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Barbata/Mammillaria barbata (syn. M. orestera) – DH584-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Barbata/Mammillaria barbata (syn. M. viridiflora) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Barbata/Mammillaria barbata (syn. M. viridiflora) – SB905 – MG774-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Barbata/Mammillaria barbata – ML 622 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Barbata/Mammillaria barbata – ML 622-1 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Barbata/Mammillaria barbata – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Baumii/Mammillaria baumii – ML 465 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Baumii/Mammillaria baumii – ML 469 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Baumii/Mammillaria baumii – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Baumii/Mammillaria baumii – Photo Franck Martin 2.jpg


Mammillaria Baumii/Mammillaria baumii – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Baumii/Mammillaria baumii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Baumii/Mammillaria baumii – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Beneckei/Mammillaria beneckei (syn. M. balsaoides – Oehmea beneckei – DH494-99 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Beneckei/Mammillaria beneckei (syn. M. guiengolensis) – ML 376 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Beneckei/Mammillaria beneckei – ML 49 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Beneckei/Mammillaria beneckei – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Beneckei/Mammillaria beneckei – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Beneckei/Mammillaria beneckei – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Berkiana/Mammillaria berkiana – MG568 – 94-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Berkiana/Mammillaria berkiana – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Berkiana/Mammillaria berkiana – Photo Hugo de Coc.jpg


Mammillaria Berkiana/Mammillaria berkiana – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Berkiana/Mammillaria berkiana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Berkiana/Mammillaria berkiana – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Bertholdii/Mammillaria bertholdii grafted – Picture Xochimanki.jpg


Mammillaria Bertholdii/Mammillaria bertholdii-Photo Thomas-Linzen.jpg


Mammillaria Bertholdii/Mammillaria bertholdii-TL-1134-Photo Thomas-Linzen.jpg


Mammillaria Blossfeldiana/Mammillaria blossfeldiana – Photo Andrea B.jpg


Mammillaria Blossfeldiana/Mammillaria blossfeldiana – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Blossfeldiana/Mammillaria blossfeldiana – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Blossfeldiana/Mammillaria blossfeldiana – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Blossfeldiana/Mammillaria blossfeldiana – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Blossfeldiana/Mammillaria blossfeldiana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Blossfeldiana/Mammillaria blossfeldiana – Photo lecactusurbain.jpg


Mammillaria Blossfeldiana/Mammillaria blossfeldiana. Closeup of flowers – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana (multilanata) – Photo Franck Martin 2.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana (multilanata) – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana (multilanata) – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana (roseiflora) – Photo Paul.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana (roseiflora) – Photo Willy .jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana (splendens) – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana – ML 79 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp bocasana Poselger – JE 18215 – Christophe Blanchy .jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp eschauzieri (syn. M. Kunzeana) – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp eschauzieri (syn. M. hirsuta) – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp eschauzieri (syn. M. knebeliana) – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp eschauzieri (syn. M. longicoma) – Photo .jpg


Mammillaria Bocasana/Mammillaria bocasana ssp eschauzieri – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Bocensis/Mammillaria bocensis (syn. M. neoschwarzeana) – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Bocensis/Mammillaria bocensis (syn. M. neoschwarzeana) – SB837 – MG810-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Bocensis/Mammillaria bocensis – In 16 cm pot – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Bocensis/Mammillaria bocensis – ML 732 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Bocensis/Mammillaria bocensis – ML 733 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Bocensis/Mammillaria bocensis – ML 734 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Bocensis/Mammillaria bocensis – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Bocensis/Mammillaria bocensis with fruits – Photo Marc.jpg


Mammillaria Boelderliana/Mammillaria boelderliana – GK4410-91 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Boelderliana/Mammillaria boelderliana – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Boelderliana/Mammillaria boelderliana – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Bombycina/Mammillaria bombycina – ML 316 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Bombycina/Mammillaria bombycina – ML 640 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Bombycina/Mammillaria bombycina – ML 640-1 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Bombycina/Mammillaria bombycina – Origine Ets Kuentz -.jpg


Mammillaria Bombycina/Mammillaria bombycina – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Bombycina/Mammillaria bombycina – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Bombycina/Mammillaria bombycina – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Bombycina/Mammillaria bombycina – Photo Murielle Strauss.jpg


Mammillaria Boolii/Mammillaria boolii – ML 733 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Boolii/Mammillaria boolii – ML 734 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Boolii/Mammillaria boolii – Photo Andrea B.jpg


Mammillaria Boolii/Mammillaria boolii – Photo Franck Martin – Collection Georges Marchand.jpg


Mammillaria Boolii/Mammillaria boolii – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Boolii/Mammillaria boolii – Photo Michael Enzendorfer.jpg


Mammillaria Boolii/Mammillaria boolii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Brachytrichion/Mammillaria brachytrichion – Hda-01 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Brachytrichion/Mammillaria brachytrichion – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Brachytrichion/Mammillaria brachytrichion – Photo Hugo De Cock 3.jpg


Mammillaria Brachytrichion/Mammillaria brachytrichion – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Brandegeei/Mammillaria brandegeei ssp brandegeei – SB1653 – MG583-4-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Brandegeei/Mammillaria brandegeei ssp brandegeei SB1903 – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Brandegeei/Mammillaria brandegeei ssp glareosa (syn. M. dawsonii) – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Brandegeei/Mammillaria brandegeei ssp glareosa – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Brandegeei/Mammillaria brandegeei ssp glareosa – Photo Michael Enzendorfer.jpg


Mammillaria Brandegeei/Mammillaria brandegeei ssp lewisiana – Photo Gerard Denis.jpg


Mammillaria Brandegeei/Mammillaria brandegeei ssp lewisiana – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Brandegeei/Mammillaria brandegeei ssp lewisiana – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida (Mammilloydia) – ML 428 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida (Mammilloydia) – ML 468 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida (Mammilloydia) – ML 468 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida (syn M. ortizrubiona) – ML 656 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida (syn M. ortizrubiona) – ML 656-1 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida (syn. M. estanzuelensis) – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida (syn. M. ortizrubiona ) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida (syn. Mammillaria ortiz-rubiona) – Photo Dag Panco – 1958.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida – ML 675 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida – ML 81 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida – ML 97 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Candida/Mammillaria candida – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Canelensis/Mammillaria canelenis – (montensis) in garden – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Canelensis/Mammillaria canelensis (montensis – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Canelensis/Mammillaria canelensis – MG594-95 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon .jpg


Mammillaria Canelensis/Mammillaria canelensis – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Canelensis/Mammillaria canelensis – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Canelensis/Mammillaria canelensis – Red spined form – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Canelensis/Mammillaria canelensis – Red spined form – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Canelensis/Mammillaria canelensis – Unusual flower color – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Capensis/Mammillaria capensis (fa pallida) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Capensis/Mammillaria capensis – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Capensis/Mammillaria capensis – Photo – Marion LENNOZ.jpg


Mammillaria Capensis/Mammillaria capensis – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Capensis/Mammillaria capensis – SB1254 – MG594-5-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae – GK4112-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae – ML 123 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae Castaneda Nunez – JE 14242 – Christophe Blanchy .jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae aiguillons rouge – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae x laui – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Carmenae/Mammillaria carmenae x lauii – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Carnea/Mammillaria carnea – ML 390 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Carnea/Mammillaria carnea – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Carnea/Mammillaria carnea – Photo Willy 2.jpg


Mammillaria Carnea/Mammillaria carnea – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Carretii/Mammillaria carretii – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Carretii/Mammillaria carretii – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Carretii/Mammillaria carretii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Carretii/Mammillaria carretii with fruit – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Cerralboa/Mammillaria cerralboa – Photo Hugo.jpg


Mammillaria Cerralboa/Mammillaria cerralboa – Photo Marc.jpg


Mammillaria Cerralboa/Mammillaria cerralboa – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Chica/Mammillaria chica REP1093 – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Chionocephala/Mammillaria chionocephala (syn. M. ritteriana) – Photo – Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Chionocephala/Mammillaria chionocephala (syn. M. ritteriana) – SB1364 – MG870-4-92 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Chionocephala/Mammillaria chionocephala – Light pink flowers – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Chionocephala/Mammillaria chionocephala – ML 639 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Chionocephala/Mammillaria chionocephala – ML533 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Chionocephala/Mammillaria chionocephala – ML533 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Chionocephala/Mammillaria chionocephala – Photo Francesco Marzocca.jpg


Mammillaria Chionocephala/Mammillaria chionocephala – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Chionocephala/Mammillaria chionocephala syn ritteriana – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Chionocephala/Mammillaria chionophala – Cream flowers – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis – Photo Manfred Stöber – 2005.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis – Photo Manfred Stöber.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis – Photo Pieter Colpaert.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp albiarmata – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp albiarmata – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp albiarmata – Photo Josef Matousek 2.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp albiarmata – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp albiarmata with fruit – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp coahuilensis – ML 556 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp coahuilensis – ML 563 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp coahuilensis – ML563 – ML-98- Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp coahuilensis – Photo Andrea B..jpg


Mammillaria Coahuilensis/Mammillaria coahuilensis ssp coahuilensis – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Columbiana/Mammillaria columbiana ssp columbiana (v. albescens) – lecactusurbain.com.jpg


Mammillaria Columbiana/Mammillaria columbiana ssp columbiana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Columbiana/Mammillaria columbiana ssp columbiana flower Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Columbiana/Mammillaria columbiana ssp columbiana fruit Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Columbiana/Mammillaria columbiana ssp yucatanensis (syn M. chiapensis) – ML373 – ML-00 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Columbiana/Mammillaria columbiana ssp yucatanensis (syn. M. chiapensis) – ML 373 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Columbiana/Mammillaria columbiana ssp yucatanensis – Photo Willy 2.jpg


Mammillaria Columbiana/Mammillaria columbiana ssp yucatanensis – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Columbiana/Mammillaria columbiana ssp yucatanensis – les fruits – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp censtralifera (syn. M. centralifera) – ML 100 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp centralifera (syn M. centralifera) – ML 497 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp centralifera (syn M. centralifera) – ML 497-1 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp centralifera (syn. M. centralifera) – ML 225 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp centralifera (syn. M. centralifera) – ML 413 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp centralifera (syn. M. centralifera) – ML 497 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp centralifera (syn. M. centralifera) – ML 497 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp centralifera (syn. M. centralifera) – ML 500 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp centralifera (syn. M. centralifera) – ML 515 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp compressa (syn. M. bernalensis) – .jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp compressa (syn. M. bernalensis) – ML 480 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp compressa – ML 166 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp compressa – ML 59 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp compressa – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp compressa – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Compressa/Mammillaria compressa ssp compressa ML 228 – Mammillaria polythele ssp polythele (syn. M. kewensis) ML 230 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita ( syn M.glochidiata) – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn M. aurihamata ML419) – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn M. moeller – valdeziana ) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. aurihamata – ML 419 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. aurihamata – ML 419 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. aurihamata) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. brevicrinita) – ML 502 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. gilensis) – ML 317 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. gilensis) – ML 317-a – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. glochidiata var xiloensis) – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. glochidiata var xiloensis) – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. painteri) – ML 283 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. painteri) – ML 67 – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. painteri) ML67 – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. painteri)- Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. puberula ) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. pubispina ) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. schelhasii var aurihamata) – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. schelhasii)- Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. variabilis ) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. M. variabilis) – ML 477 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. gilensis) – ML304 – MS18-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita (syn. gilensis) – U1751-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita – De Candolle – ML 67 JE 25311 – Christophe Blanchy – Graines récoltées par Michel Lacoste au Mexique, Queretar.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp crinita var. felipensis (syn M. felipensis) – Rep636 – GK4717-94 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii (calleana) – Photo Willy Bovis.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii (syn calleana) – GK1075-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii (syn. M. wildii) – ML 211 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii (syn. M. wildii)- ML 211 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii (syn. M. wildii)- ML 211 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii (syn. M. wildii)- ML 211 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii – Photo Marc.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii – Photo Willy Bovis.jpg


Mammillaria Crinita/Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii. Old specimen in spring – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp crucigera (syn M. crucigera var grandinosa) – FO223 – MG928-3-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp crucigera (syn. M. crucigera var grandinosa) – ML 41 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp crucigera (syn. M. crucigera var grandinosa) – ML 41 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp crucigera – GK2734-91 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp crucigera – ML 193 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp crucigera – ML 193 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp crucigera – Photo Norman Dennis – In collection at Bachs Nursery Tucson AZ.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp crucigera – WM 4540 – Photo Chris Davies.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp tlalocii (syn. M. tlalocii) – ML 43 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp tlalocii (syn. M. tlalocii) – ML 43 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp tlalocii – FO229 – Photo Francesco Marzocca.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp tlalocii – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Crucigera/Mammillaria crucigera ssp tlalocii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp albescens – Rep.1987 – Photo Michael Enzendorfer.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp camptotricha (syn M. campotricha) – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp camptotricha (syn M. campotricha) – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp camptotricha (syn. M. camptotricha) – ML 481 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp camptotricha (syn. M. camptotricha) – ML 481 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp decipiens – ML 139 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp decipiens – ML 78 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp decipiens – ML139 – ML-00 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp decipiens – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp decipiens – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Decipiens/Mammillaria decipiens ssp decipiens – Photo et plante Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana spp deherdtiana – first flower – Photo Stan Oome.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp deherdtiana – DH1114-91 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp deherdtiana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp deherdtiana – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp deherdtiana – Plant from De Herdt – Photo Pieter Colpaert.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp deherdtiana – flower close up – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp deherdtiana – in 16 cm bulb pot – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp deherdtiana – in bud with first flower – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii (syn. M. dodsonii) – ML 354 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii (syn. M. dodsonii) – ML 354 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii (syn. M. dodsonii) – ML 354 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii (syn. M. dodsonii) – ML 354 – Photo Michel Lacoste 4.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii (syn. M. dodsonii) – ML 354 – Photo Michel Lacoste 5.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii (syn. M. dodsonii) – ML 354 – Photo Michel Lacoste 6.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii (syn. M. dodsonii) – ML 354 – Photo Michel Lacoste 7.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii (syn. M. dodsonii) – ML 354 – Photo Michel Lacoste 8.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii f. albiflora – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Deherdtiana/Mammillaria deherdtiana ssp dodsonii var. aiguillons rouges – DH-99 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina (syn M. buxbaumeriana) – ML142 – SS540-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina (syn M. buxbaumeriana) – Photo Bert Hahnraths.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina (syn. M. buxbaumeriana) – ML 142 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina (syn. M. buxbaumeriana) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina – ML 310 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina – ML 312 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina – ML 315 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina – ML 315 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina – ML 581 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina – ML 581 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina – ML 581 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina – ML 86 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Densispina/Mammillaria densispina – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Dioica/Mammillaria dioica – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Dioica/Mammillaria dioica – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Dioica/Mammillaria dioica – SB1262 – MG621-45-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Discolor/Mammillaria discolor (syn. M. discolor v. longispina) – ML 172 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Discolor/Mammillaria discolor (syn. M. discolor v. ochoterenae) – ML 256 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Discolor/Mammillaria discolor (syn. M. esperanzaensis) – ML 275 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Discolor/Mammillaria discolor (syn. M. ochoterenae) – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Discolor/Mammillaria discolor – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Discolor/Mammillaria discolor – Photo Franck Martin 1.jpg


Mammillaria Discolor/Mammillaria discolor – Photo Franck Martin 2.jpg


Mammillaria Discolor/Mammillaria discolor var. multispina – DH205-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron (leptacantha)- Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron (rubispina) (Deherdt Belgium) – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron (rubrispina) – ML 199 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron (syn M. celsiana) – L1054 – MG624-9-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 175 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 190 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 197 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 197 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 200 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 200 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 389 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 39 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 396 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 396 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 396 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML 40 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – ML145 – ML-00 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – Origine Beugin – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Dixanthocentron/Mammillaria dixanthocentron – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis (regular form) tenango de valle white fowered form – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis (slender form) – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis (syn M. erythrocalyx) – Rep839 – GK4470-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis (syn claviformis) – Rep1462 – GK 8841-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis (syn. M. erythrocalyx) – ML 345 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis – ML 347 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis – ML 349 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis – ML 349 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis – ML347 – MG629-2-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Duoformis/Mammillaria duoformis ML347 – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp echinaria – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp echinaria – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp echinaria – Photo Bert Hahnraths.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp echinaria – SB555 – MG637-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – Jardin Exotique de Monaco – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – ML 490 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – ML 63 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – ML 63 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – Variations – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – Variations – Photo Norman Dennis 3.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – Variations – Photo Norman Dennis 4.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – Variations – Photo Norman Dennis 5.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – Variations – Photo Norman Dennis 6.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – Variations – Photo Norman Dennis 7.jpg


Mammillaria Elongata/Mammillaria elongata ssp elongata – Variations – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Eriacantha/Mammillaria eriacantha – L1104 – DH186-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Eriacantha/Mammillaria eriacantha – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Erythrosperma/Mammillaria erythrosperma – ML 322 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Erythrosperma/Mammillaria erythrosperma – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Erythrosperma/Mammillaria erythrosperma – SB825 – MG640-94 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Erythrosperma/Mammillaria erythrosperma SB 825 – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Eumorphos/Mammillaria eumorphos Rep 2264 – n.n. – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Evermanniana/Mammillaria evermanniana – MG640-9-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Evermanniana/Mammillaria evermanniana – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Evermanniana/Mammillaria evermanniana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Evermanniana/Mammillaria evermanniana – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Fittkaui/Mammillaria fittkaui – MG642-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Fittkaui/Mammillaria fittkaui – ML 298 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Fittkaui/Mammillaria fittkaui – ML 298 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Fittkaui/Mammillaria fittkaui – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Flavicentra/Mammillaria flavicentra – ML 182 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Flavicentra/Mammillaria flavicentra – ML 194 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Flavicentra/Mammillaria flavicentra – ML 194 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Flavicentra/Mammillaria flavicentra – ML 392 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Flavicentra/Mammillaria flavicentra – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Flavicentra/Mammillaria flavicentra – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ( Huizache ) – AdB 1-22 GPS-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 414 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 417 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 420 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 420 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 420 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 424 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 429 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 429 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 433 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 436 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 437 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 437 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 440 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 444 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 445 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 445 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 447 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 449 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 455 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 573 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML 573 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa – ML564 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa (syn M. arroyensis) -Rep1054 – GK4117 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa (syn. M. arroyensis) – ML 427 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa (syn. M. arroyensis) – ML 427 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa (syn. M. arroyensis) – ML 427 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa (syn. M. arroyensis) – ML 427 – Photo Michel Lacoste 4.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa (syn. M. arroyensis) – ML 519 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa (syn. M. arroyensis) – ML 519 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa (syn. M. arroyensis) – ML 519 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 110 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 113 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 305 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 445 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 447 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 676 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 685 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 685-1 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 688 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 688-1 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp formosa – ML 80 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp microthele (superfina) – Photo Pieter Colpaert.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp microthele (syn. M. microthele) – ML 505 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp microthele (syn. M. microthele) – ML 505 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp microthele (syn. M. microthele) – ML 505 – Photo Michel Lacoste 4.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp microthele (syn. M. microthele) – ML 505 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp microthele (syn. M. microthele) – ML 510 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp microthele (syn. M. microthele) – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp microthele – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp pseudocrucigera (syn. M. pseudocrucigera) – ML 483 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp pseudocrucigera (syn. M. pseudocrucigera) – ML 483 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp pseudocrucigera (syn. M. pseudocrucigera) – ML 483 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Formosa/Mammillaria formosa ssp pseudocrucigera – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Fraileana/Mammillaria fraileana – ML 719 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Fraileana/Mammillaria fraileana – ML701 A – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Fraileana/Mammillaria fraileana – ML701 A – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Fraileana/Mammillaria fraileana – Photo Paolo.jpg


Mammillaria Fraileana/Mammillaria fraileana – Photo Willy 2.jpg


Mammillaria Fraileana/Mammillaria fraileana – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Fraileana/Mammillaria fraileana – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Fraileana/Mammillaria fraileana – Photo Franck Martin 2.jpg


Mammillaria Fraileana/Mammillaria fraileana – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Fraileana/Mammillaria fraileana with flowers and fruit – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. chica) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. viescensis) – ML 546 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. viescensis) – ML 558 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. viescensis) – ML 559 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. viescensis) – ML 559 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. viescensis) – ML 559 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. viescensis) – ML 562 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. viescensis) – ML 562 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. viescensis) – ML 562 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. viescensis) – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana (syn. M. viescensis) -Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – ML 603 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – ML 607 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – ML630 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – Photo Manfred Stober 2.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – Photo Manfred Stober 1.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – Photo Manfred Stober 3.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – Photo Manfred Stober 4.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – Photo Manfred Stober 5.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – Photo Manfred Stober 6.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – Photo Manfred Stober 7.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – Photo Manfred Stober 8.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – SB1161 – MG653-1-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – SB1161 – MG653-198 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon 2.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana – SB1431 – MG653-14-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Gasseriana/Mammillaria gasseriana SB1164 – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina – Photo Bert Hahnraths 2.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina – Photo Bert Hahnraths.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina ( nobilis)- Photo – Marion LENNOZ.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina (syn. M. geminispina var. nobilis) – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina – ML 158 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina – ML 467- Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina – ML 569 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina – ML 569 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco 1.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco 2.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp geminispina – Photo Pieter Colpaert.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra (syn. M. albata v. sanciro) – ML 75 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra (syn. M. albata v. sanciro) – ML 77 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra (syn. M. albata) – ML 499 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra (syn. M. albata) – ML 503 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra (syn. M. albata) – ML 507 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra (syn. M. albata) – ML 508 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra (syn. M. albata) – ML 508 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra (syn. M. albata) – ML 514 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra (syn. M. leucocentra) – ML 62 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Geminispina/Mammillaria geminispina ssp leucocentra – Rep1049 – GK_1095-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Gigantea/Mammillaria gigantea (syn. M. saint-pieana) – ML 324 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Gigantea/Mammillaria gigantea (syn. Mammilaria hamilton-hoytea) – Photo Dag Panco Cette plante a ete semee en avril 1961.jpg


Mammillaria Gigantea/Mammillaria gigantea – ML 143 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Gigantea/Mammillaria gigantea – ML 328 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Gigantea/Mammillaria gigantea – ML 85 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Gigantea/Mammillaria gigantea – ML 85 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Gigantea/Mammillaria gigantea – ML 85 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Gigantea/Mammillaria gigantea – ML 91 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Gigantea/Mammillaria gigantea – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Gigantea/Mammillaria gigantea – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassi ssp ascensionis (syn. M. nominis-dulcis) – L1186a – MG658-4-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassi ssp ascensionis (syn. M. nominis-dulcis) – ML 430 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassi ssp ascensionis (syn. M. nominis-dulcis) – ML 430 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp ascensionis (syn. M. nominis-dulcis) – Photo Norman Dennis 9.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp ascensionis (syn. M. nominis-dulcis)- Photo Norman Dennis .jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii – ML 456 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii – Photo Norman Dennis 7.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp ascensionis (syn. M. ascensionis) – ML 438 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp ascensionis (syn. M. glassii v. siberiensis) – ML 425 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp ascensionis (syn. M. glassii v. siberiensis) – ML 425 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp ascensionis (syn. M. glassii v. siberiensis) – ML 425 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp ascensionis (syn. M. glassii v. siberiensis) – ML 425 – Photo Michel Lacoste 4.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp ascensionis (syn. M.glassii v. nominis-dulcis) – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp ascensionis – ML 438 – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp glassii – ML 461 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp glassii – ML 461 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp glassii – Photo Razvan Diaconescu .jpg


Mammillaria Glassii/Mammillaria glassii ssp glassii – Photo Willy Bovis.jpg


Mammillaria Goodridgei/Mammillaria goodridgei – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Goodridgei/Mammillaria goodridgei – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Goodridgei/Mammillaria goodridgei – Photo Stan Oome.jpg


Mammillaria Goodridgei/Mammillaria goodridgei – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii (syn M. microcarpa v auricarpa) – DH635-91 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii (syn M. microcarpa v auricarpa) – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii (syn. M. microcarpa var. oliviae – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii (syn. M. microcarpa) SB147 – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii (syn. M. olivae) – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii (syn. M. oliviae) – DH565-99 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii (syn. M. oliviae) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii (syn. M. oliviae) – Photo Franck Martin 1.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii (syn. M. oliviae) – Photo Franck Martin 2.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii – Arizona -Phoenix – Squaw Peak – Paradise Valley – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii – Photo Willy Bovis.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii – Reddington Pass just E. of Tucson – Arizona – Photo Frank Gibson Breckenridge III.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii – Tucson Mountains, AZ – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii in my backyard – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Grahamii/Mammillaria grahamii winter habitat, Phoenix, AZ – Photo Dora snyder.jpg


Mammillaria Grusonii/Mammillaria grusonii (syn. M. durangicola) – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Grusonii/Mammillaria grusonii (syn. M. durangicola) – Rep545 – GK4398-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Grusonii/Mammillaria grusonii (syn. M. pachycylindrica ) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Grusonii/Mammillaria grusonii (syn. M. papasquiarensis) – ML 634 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Grusonii/Mammillaria grusonii (syn. M. papasquiarensis) – ML 636 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Grusonii/Mammillaria grusonii (syn. M. papasquiarensis) – ML 636-1 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Grusonii/Mammillaria grusonii (syn. M. zeyeriana ) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Grusonii/Mammillaria grusonii – ML 537 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Grusonii/Mammillaria grusonii – ML 543 – Photo Michel Lacoste .jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana (robustior) – Photo Manfred Stober 1.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana (robustior) – Photo Manfred Stober 2.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana (robustior) – Photo Manfred Stober 3.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana (robustior) – Photo Manfred Stober 4.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana (robustior) – Photo Manfred Stober 5.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana (robustior) – Photo Manfred Stober 6.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana (var. robustior) – ROG 519 Puente Nazas- Rodeo- Dgo – hez Piltz photo lecactusurbain.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – ML 618 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – ML 618 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – ML 618 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – ML 618 – Photo Michel Lacoste 4.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – ML 618 – Photo Michel Lacoste 5.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – ML 618 – Photo Michel Lacoste 6.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Andrea B. 2.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Andrea B.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Keith.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Le Petit Poucet.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Luc 2.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Willy 2.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana – Photo et Plante Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana flower – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Guelzowiana/Mammillaria guelzowiana var. splendens – DH486-99 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Guerreronis/Mammillaria guerreronis – Arizon-, Phoenix- Desert Botanical Garden – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Guerreronis/Mammillaria guerreronis – ML 32 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Guerreronis/Mammillaria guerreronis – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Guerreronis/Mammillaria guerreronis – Photo Norman Dennis 30 cm pot.jpg


Mammillaria Guerreronis/Mammillaria guerreronis – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Guillauminiana/Mammillaria guillauminiana (syn mercadensis var guillauminiana)- Photo Luc .jpg


Mammillaria Guillauminiana/Mammillaria guillauminiana – U3497-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon .jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana Tonala – L1132 – MG677-95-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp acultzingensis (syn. M. acultzingensis) TL 159 – ML-99 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. conspicua) – ML 184 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. conspicua) – ML 247 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. conspicua) – ML 35 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. conspicua) – ML 378 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. conspicua) – ML 380 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. conspicua) – ML 380 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. conspicua) – ML 382 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. conspicua) ROG 334 – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. vaupelii flavispina) – WM7510 – MG931-3-95 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. vaupelii) – ML 245 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua (syn. M. vaupelii) ML 252 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp conspicua – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp elegans (syn. M. collina) – ML 272 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp elegans (syn. M. collina) – ML 55 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp elegans (syn. M. elegans) – ML 644 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp elegans (syn. M. elegans) x flavicentra – ML 249 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp elegans – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp elegans – Photo Stan Oome 2.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp elegans – Photo Stan Oome.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana (syn M. elegans v. longicaudata) – ML 236 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana (syn M. elegans v. longicaudata)- ML 236 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana (syn. M. elegans v. longicaudata) – ML 236 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana (syn. M. elegans v. teyuca) – ML 51 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana (syn. M. elegans var. lupina) – ML33 – ML-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana (syn. M. kunthii ) – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana (syn. kunthii) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana – ML 259 – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana – ML 57 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp haageana – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp san angelenis – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp san-angelensis (syn. M. dealbata) recently transplanted from garden. Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp san-angelensis – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmolii (syn. M. meissneri) Tecomavaca – AdB5-29 – GPS-95 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii (syn. M. meissneri) – ML 192 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii (syn. M. meissneri) – ML 192 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii (syn. M. meissneri) – ML 192 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii (syn. M. meissneri) – ML 220 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii (syn. M. meissneri) – ML 220 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii (syn. M. meissneri) – ML 220 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii (syn. M. meissneri) – ML 41 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii (syn. M. meissneri) – ML 41 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii (syn. M. meissneri) – ML 41 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Haageana/Mammillaria haageana ssp schmollii (syn. M. meissnerii) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana (albiflora) (collection De Herdt – obtention horticole) – Photo Paul.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana (albifora) – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana Werdermann ssp woodsii (R. T. Craig) D. R. Hunt – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp bravoae – Photo Razvan Diaconescu.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp bravoae – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp bravoae – Photo Philou.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – ML 489 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – ML 492 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – ML 493 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – ML 493 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – ML 496 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – ML 496 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – ML 496 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – ML 74 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – Photo Christophe Blanchy 2.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – Photo Le Petit Poucet.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp hahniana – Photo Murielle Strauss.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp mendeliana (syn. M. mendeliana) – ML 234 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp mendeliana (syn. M. mendeliana) – ML 234 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp mendeliana (syn. M. mendeliana) – ML 234 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp mendeliana – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp woodsi – Photo Marc.jpg


Mammillaria Hahniana/Mammillaria hahniana ssp woodsii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Halbingeri/Mammillaria aff. halbingeri – ROG 159 -Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Halbingeri/Mammillaria halbingeri (syn M. pseudohalbingeri) – ML259 – ML01 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Halbingeri/Mammillaria halbingeri – ML 257 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Halbingeri/Mammillaria halbingeri – ML 257 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Halbingeri/Mammillaria halbingeri fleurs blanches – TL200 et TL199 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Halei/Mammillaria halei (Cochemiea halei) – Photo Seb.jpg


Mammillaria Heidiae/Mammillaria heidiae – ML 202 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Heidiae/Mammillaria heidiae – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Heidiae/Mammillaria heidiae – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Heidiae/Mammillaria heidiae – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – GK4115-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – ML 250 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – ML 250 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – ML 250 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – ML 250 – Photo Michel Lacoste 4.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – Photo Franck Martin 2.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – Photo Norman Dennis – Clumping plant view without flowers.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – Photo Norman Dennis 8 cm plant with 51 buds.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Hernandezii/Mammillaria hernandezii – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – MG687-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – ML 66 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – Photo Franck Martin – Plante Yann Cochard.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – Photo Keith Mail.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – Photo Keith.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – Photo Manfred Stober 1.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – Photo Manfred Stober.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – Photo Manfred Stöber 3.jpg


Mammillaria Herrerae/Mammillaria herrerae – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gaumeri – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gaumeri – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (Engelmann) D. R. Hunt – JE 13972 – Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn M. gummifera) – ML 605 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn M. gummifera) – ML 609 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn M. gummifera) – ML 609 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn M. gummifera) – ML 609-2 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn M. gummifera) – ML 611 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn M. gummifera) – ML 621 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn M. gummifera) – ML 621 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn M. gummifera) – ML 621 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn. M. gummifera) – ML 577 – Photo Michel Lacoste -Los_Hornillos_Zac.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn. M. gummifera) – ML 577 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn. M. gummifera) – ML 579 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn. M. gummifera) – ML 596 – Photo Michel Lacoste – _Jer_z_de_Garcia_ZACHuej_car_JAL.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera (syn. M. gummifera) – ML 596 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera – Photo Norman Dennis 1.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp gummifera – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp hemisphaerica – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp hemisphaerica – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp heyderi (syn. M. heyderi v applanata) – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp heyderi – ML 638 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp heyderi – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp macdougalii – Photo Hugo De Cock 1.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp macdougalii – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp macdouglii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp meaicantha (syn. M. meaicantha) – ML 451 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp meaicantha (syn. M. meaicantha) – ML 451 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp meaicantha (syn. M. meaicantha)- ML 416 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp meaicantha (syn. M. meaicantha)- ML 416 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp meiacantha (syn. M. meiacantha) – ML 528 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp meiacantha (syn. M. meiacantha) – ML 530 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp meiacantha (syn. M. meiacantha) – ML 535 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp meiacantha – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Heyderi/Mammillaria heyderi ssp meiacantha – Photo Michael Enzendorfer.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli – Photo Stan Oome.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp huitzilopochtli (Origine Kuentz) – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp huitzilopochtli – FO13 – MG701-72-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp huitzilopochtli – ML 189 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp huitzilopochtli – ML 189 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp huitzilopochtli – ML 198 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp huitzilopochtli – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp huizilopochtli – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp niduliformis – L1495 – MG701-92-92 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli ssp niduliformis – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Huitzilopochtli/Mammillaria huitzilopochtli var. cuicatlanensis – TL329 – ML-00 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii – Flowers in January – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii – ML 150 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii – ML 150 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii – ML 153 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii – ML 165 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii – ML 165 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii – Photo Manfred Stober.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Humboldtii/Mammillaria humboldtii var. intermedia – GK4105-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp hutchinsoniana (syn M. bullardiana) – DH536-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp hutchinsoniana (syn M. bullardiana) – ML 722 -Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp hutchinsoniana (syn. M. bullardiana) – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp hutchinsoniana – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp hutchinsoniana – Photo Norman Dennis – Close up of flower.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp hutchinsoniana – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp hutchinsoniana – SB1652 – MG705-41-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp louisae – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp louisae – Photo Luc Laermans.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp louisae – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Hutchinsoniana/Mammillaria hutchinsoniana ssp louisae – SB1484 – MG739-3-91 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Insularis/Mammillaria insularis (Origine Panarotto) – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Insularis/Mammillaria insularis – GK940-91 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Insularis/Mammillaria insularis – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Insularis/Mammillaria insularis – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Insularis/Mammillaria insularis – Photo Paolo.jpg


Mammillaria Insularis/Mammillaria insularis – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Insularis/Mammillaria insularis – Photo Franck Martin – Collection Georges Marchand.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana (ssp jaliscana syn. M. fuscohamata) – ML 302 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana – Laui 1050 – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana – ML 293 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana (syn. M. fuscohamata) – DH539-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana (syn. M. fuscohamata) – ML 302 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana – L1048 – GK3827-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana – ML 292 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana – ML 299 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana – ML 299 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana – ML 584 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana – ML 584 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana – ML 586 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana – ML 589 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp jaliscana – ML 589 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp zacatecasensis – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Jaliscana/Mammillaria jaliscana ssp zacatecasensis SB 342 – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii (SB432) – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii (syn. M. johnstonii var. sancarlensis) – Origine Beugin – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii – ML 734 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii – ML 735 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii – ML 736 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii – ML 737 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii – ML 738 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii – ML 739 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii – ML 740 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii – ML 741 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Johnstonii/Mammillaria johnstonii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp beiselii (syn. M. Beiselii) – Photo Giuseppe Ruini .jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp beiselii – Photo Hugo De Cock 1.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp beiselii – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp beiselii – Photo Hugo De Cock 3.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp beiselii – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp beiselii – Photo Murielle Strauss.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp collinsi – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp collinsii (syn. M. Collinsii ) – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp collinsii (syn. M. collinsii) – ML 376 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp collinsii (syn. M. tropica) – Rep677 – GK8837-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp karwinskiana (Origine Hans Boon) – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp karwinskiana (syn. M. confusa) – ML 384 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp karwinskiana (syn. M. multiseta) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp karwinskiana (syn. M.multiseta) – ML201 – ML-00 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp karwinskiana – ML 352 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp karwinskiana – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp nejapensis (syn. M. nejapensis) – ML 262 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp nejapensis (syn. M. nejapensis) – ML 262 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp nejapensis (syn. M. nejapensis) – ML 383 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp nejapensis (syn. M. nejapensis)- – ML 262 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp nejapensis (syn. M. nejapensis)- ML 260 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp nejapensis (syn. M. nejapensis)- ML 381 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp nejapensis (syn. M. nejapensis)- ML 381 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Karwinskiana/Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp. karwinskiana (syn M. confusa Mitla) – AdB5-50 – GPS-95 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana (syn. M. Brauneana) Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana (syn. M. brauneana ) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana (syn. M. brauneana) – Photo Willy 1.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana (syn. M. brauneana) – Photo Willy 2.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana (syn. M. brauneana) – Photo Willy 3.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana – ML 470 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana – ML 470 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana – ML 473 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana – ML 473 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana – ML 473 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Klissingiana/Mammillaria klissingiana in ground – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Knippeliana/Mammillaria knippeliana – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Kraehenbuehlii/Mammillaria kraehenbuehlii – FO97 – WH-94 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Kraehenbuehlii/Mammillaria kraehenbuehlii – KC-94 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Kraehenbuehlii/Mammillaria kraehenbuehlii – ML 246 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Kraehenbuehlii/Mammillaria kraehenbuehlii – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Kraehenbuehlii/Mammillaria kraehenbuehlii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Kraehenbuehlii/Mammillaria kraehenbuehlii – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha – Photo Josef Matousek 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha spp lasiacantha – Photo Stan Oome.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp egregia – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp egregia – Photo Stan Oome 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp egregia – Photo Stan Oome.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp hyalina (syn M. wohlschlageri) – ML 599 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp hyalina (syn M. wohlschlageri) – ML 599 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp hyalina (syn. M. wohlschlageri) – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp hyalina (syn. M. wohlschlageri) – SB32 – MG_951-5-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp hyalina – Photo Hugo De Cock .jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp hyalina – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp lasciacantha – ML 681 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp lasciacantha – ML 681 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp lasciacantha – ML 681 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp lasiacantha ( var denudata) – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp lasiacantha (syn. M. Denudata) Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp lasiacantha – GL14 – MG716-8-94 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp lasiacantha – ML 538 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp lasiacantha – ML 542 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp. egregia (syn M. egregia) – GL20 – MG633-1-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp. egregia (syn M. egregia) – GL20 – MG633-1-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Lasiacantha/Mammillaria lasiacantha ssp. egregia (syn M. egregia) – SB30 – MG633-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp dasyacantha – MG725-7-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp dasyacantha – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp laui (fleurs blanches ) – DH1055-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp laui (nova) – L1496 – Hog-01 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp laui (white flowers) – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp laui – ML 127 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp laui – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp laui – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp laui – Photo Willy 3.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp subducta (aiguillons rouges) – DH1048-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp subducta (syn. M. subducta) – ML 124 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp subducta (syn. M. subducta) – ML 127 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp subducta – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp subducta – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp. subducta – Photo Dag Panco 2.jpg


Mammillaria Laui/Mammillaria laui ssp. subducta – Photo Dag Panco.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – ML 538 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – ML 540 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – ML 540 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – ML 549 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – ML 549 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – ML 549 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – Photo Dag Panco.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – Photo Stan Oome.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – SB1719 – MG728-3-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Lenta/Mammillaria lenta – photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Limonensis/Mammillaria limonensis – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Limonensis/Mammillaria limonensis – Rep1620 – GK1090-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Lindsayi/Mammillaria lindsayi – 31 cm clump – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Lindsayi/Mammillaria lindsayi – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lindsayi/Mammillaria lindsayi – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Lindsayi/Mammillaria lindsayi – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Lindsayi/Mammillaria lindsayi – Photo Luc 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lindsayi/Mammillaria lindsayi – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Lloydii/Mammillaria lloydii – ML 694 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Lloydii/Mammillaria lloydii – ML 694 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lloydii/Mammillaria lloydii – ML 694 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Lloydii/Mammillaria lloydii – ML 694 – Photo Michel Lacoste 4.jpg


Mammillaria Lloydii/Mammillaria lloydii – Photo Luc 2.jpg


Mammillaria Lloydii/Mammillaria lloydii – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Lloydii/Mammillaria lloydii – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Lloydii/Mammillaria lloydii ML 694 lecactusurbain.com.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp longiflora – ML 613 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp longiflora – ML 613 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp longiflora – P369 – Photo Paul.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp longiflora – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp longiflora – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp longiflora – Photo Stan Oome.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp longiflora – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp longiflora – SB1936 – MG734-3-99-00 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp stampferi (ex breviflora) – SW9194-95 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp stampferi – Photo Andrea B.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp stampferi – Photo Mike Ashworth.gif


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp stampferi – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp stampferi – Photo Stan Oome 2.jpg


Mammillaria Longiflora/Mammillaria longiflora ssp stampferi – Photo Willy 1.jpg


Mammillaria Longimamma/Mammillaria longimamma (CH276) – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Longimamma/Mammillaria longimamma (syn. M. uberiformis) – ML 482 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Longimamma/Mammillaria longimamma – ML 2 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Longimamma/Mammillaria longimamma – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Longimamma/Mammillaria longimamma – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Longimamma/Mammillaria longimamma – Photo Franck Martin 2.jpg


Mammillaria Longimamma/Mammillaria longimamma – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Longimamma/Mammillaria longimamma – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethy – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethy – Photo Paolo.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyi – Photo Andrea B.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyi – Photo Josef Matousek 2.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyi – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyi – Photo Paul.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyi – Photo Alain Laroze.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyi – Photo Franck Martin – Plante Yann Cochard.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyi – Photo Franck Martin .jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyi – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyi fruit – Photo Franck Martin – Collection Yann Cochard 1.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyi fruit zoom – Photo Franck Martin – Collection Yann Cochard.jpg


Mammillaria Luethy/Mammillaria luethyii – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallani (syn. M. roseocentra) – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallani – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallani – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallani – Photo Josef Matousek 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallani – SB1017 – MG743-2-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallanii (syn. M. neobertrandia) – DH1126-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallanii (syn. M. neobertrandia) – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallanii – ML 534 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallanii – ML 534 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallanii – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallanii – Photo Josef Matousek 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallanii v. hamatispina – ML 536 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magallani/Mammillaria magallanii v. hamatispina – ML 536 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnifica/Mammillaria magnifica (syn. M. magnifica v. minor) – ML 238 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnifica/Mammillaria magnifica – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Magnifica/Mammillaria magnifica on bench – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Magnifica/Mammillaria magnifica rubrispina – DH566-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. bucarelensis var tamaulipa) – ML 667 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. bucarelensis var tamaulipa) – ML 667 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. bucareliensis (syn M. bicornuta) – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. priessnitzii) – ML 661 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. priessnitzii) – ML 661 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. priessnitzii) – ML 661 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. rioverdense) – ML 663 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. vagaspina) – ML 571 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. vagaspina) – ML 571 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. vagaspina) – ML 691 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. vallensi var brevispina) – ML 666 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn M. vallensi var brevispina) – ML 666 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. bucareliensis) – ML 485 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. saxicola) – ML 209 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. saxicola) – ML 73 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. saxicola) – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. vagaspina) – ML 421 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. vagaspina) – ML 421 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. vagaspina) – ML 571 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. vagaspina) – ML 89 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. vagaspina) – ML 94 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. vagaspina) – ML 94 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. zuccariniana) – .jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. zuccariniana) – ML 402 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma (syn. M. zuccariniana) – ML 402 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – ML 156 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – ML 156 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – ML 227 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – ML 306 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – ML 404 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – ML 478 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – ML 478 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – ML 574 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – Photo Bert Hahnraths 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – Photo Bert Hahnraths.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – Photo Norman Dennis 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – Photo – Marion LENNOZ.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco 1.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma fm. priessnetzii – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma fruits – Photo Stan Oome 2.jpg


Mammillaria Magnimamma/Mammillaria magnimamma fruits – Photo Stan Oome 3.jpg


Mammillaria Mainiae/Mammillaria mainiae – Photo Hugo De Cock 1.jpg


Mammillaria Mainiae/Mammillaria mainiae – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Mainiae/Mammillaria mainiae – Photo Hugo De Cock 3.jpg


Mammillaria Mainiae/Mammillaria mainiae – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Mammillaris/Mammillaria mammilaris (habitat Curaçao) – Photo – Tom Twijnstra 1.jpg


Mammillaria Mammillaris/Mammillaria mammilaris (habitat Curaçao) – Photo – Tom Twijnstra 2.jpg


Mammillaria Mammillaris/Mammillaria mammillaris – Origine Ets. Kuentz – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Mammillaris/Mammillaria mammillaris – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Mammillaris/Mammillaria mammillaris – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Mammillaris/Mammillaria mammillaris – Photo et Plante Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Manana/Mammillaria manana – photo David Rush and Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Marcosii/Mammillaria marcosii – ML 658 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Marcosii/Mammillaria marcosii – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Marcosii/Mammillaria marcosii – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Marcosii/Mammillaria marcosii – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Marksiana/Mammillaria marksiana (Origine Hans Boon) – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Marksiana/Mammillaria marksiana – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Marksiana/Mammillaria marksiana – Photo et plante Franck Martin 1.jpg


Mammillaria Marksiana/Mammillaria marksiana – Photo et plante Franck Martin 2.jpg


Mammillaria Marksiana/Mammillaria marksiana flower – photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Mathildae/Mammillaria mathildae – ML 287 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Mathildae/Mammillaria mathildae – ML 287 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Mathildae/Mammillaria mathildae – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Matudae/Mammillaria matudae – DH245-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Matudae/Mammillaria matudae – Photo Norman Dennis 1.jpg


Mammillaria Matudae/Mammillaria matudae – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Matudae/Mammillaria matudae – Photo – Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Matudae/Mammillaria matudae – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Matudae/Mammillaria matudae – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Matudae/Mammillaria matudae – Photo Murielle Strauss.jpg


Mammillaria Mazatlanensis/Mammillaria mazatlanensis ssp mazatlanensis ( syn littoralis )- Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Mazatlanensis/Mammillaria mazatlanensis ssp mazatlanensis (syn. M. occidentalis)- Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Mazatlanensis/Mammillaria mazatlanensis ssp mazatlanensis – Photo Norman Dennis 1.jpg


Mammillaria Mazatlanensis/Mammillaria mazatlanensis ssp mazatlanensis – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Mazatlanensis/Mammillaria mazatlanensis ssp mazatlanensis – Photo Norman Dennis 3.jpg


Mammillaria Mazatlanensis/Mammillaria mazatlanensis ssp mazatlanensis – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Mazatlanensis/Mammillaria mazatlanensis ssp patonii – Photo Gerard Denis.jpg


Mammillaria Melaleuca/Mammillaria melaleuca – ML 669 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Melaleuca/Mammillaria melaleuca – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Melaleuca/Mammillaria melaleuca – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Melaleuca/Mammillaria melaleuca – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp linaresensis – Photo Hugo de Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp melanocentra – Photo Flo Santo.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp melanocentra – Photo Murielle Strauss.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis (syn. M. rubrograndis) – ML 125 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis (syn. M. rubrograndis) – ML 125 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis (syn. M. rubrograndis) – ML 423 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis (syn. M. rubrograndis)- ML 432 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis – Photo Manfred Stober 2.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis – Photo Manfred Stober 3.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis – Photo Manfred Stober 4.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis – Photo Manfred Stober.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp rubrograndis – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Melanocentra/Mammillaria melanocentra ssp. melanocentra – Photo Dag Panco – 1960.jpg


Mammillaria Mercadensis/Mammillaria mercadensis – L696 – SW9320-93 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Mercadensis/Mammillaria mercadensis – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Meyranii/Mammillaria meyranii (syn M. meyranii v. michoacana) – ML 646 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Meyranii/Mammillaria meyranii – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia (syn M. drogeana) – DH545-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia (syn. M. droegeana) – ML 479 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia (syn. M. droegeana) – ML 479 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia (syn. M. microheliopsis) – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia – ML 285 – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia – ML 285 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia – ML 285 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia – ML 285 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia – Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia – Photo Josef Matousek.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia – Photo Franck Martin.jpg


Mammillaria Microhelia/Mammillaria microhelia – Photo Willy 2.jpg


Mammillaria Miegeana/Mammillaria miegeana – L612 – DH230-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Miegeana/Mammillaria miegeana – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Mieheana/Mammillaria mieheana (globosa) – DH576-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Mieheana/Mammillaria mieheana – Origine Cerutti – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Minnichii/Mammillaria minnichii n.n. – ML 191 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana (syn. M. cowperae) – ML 576 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana (syn. M. cowperae) – ML 576 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana (syn. M. cowperae) – P456 – Photo Tom Twijnstra.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana (syn. M. cowperae) – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana – L1334 – MG792-2-97 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana – L1366 – MG792-3-96 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana – ML 606 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana – ML 606-1 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana – ML 606-2 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana – Photo Dag Panco.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana – Photo Norman Dennis 1.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana – Photo Norman Dennis 2.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana – Photo Norman Dennis 3.jpg


Mammillaria Moelleriana/Mammillaria moelleriana – Photo Norman Dennis 5.jpg


Mammillaria Morganiana/Mammillaria morganiana – ML 487 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Morganiana/Mammillaria morganiana – ML 487 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Morganiana/Mammillaria morganiana – ML 655 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Morganiana/Mammillaria morganiana – ML 659 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Morganiana/Mammillaria morganiana – ML 659 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Morganiana/Mammillaria morganiana – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Muehlenpfordtii/Mammillaria muehlenpfordtii – ML 144 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Muehlenpfordtii/Mammillaria muehlenpfordtii – ML 286 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Muehlenpfordtii/Mammillaria muehlenpfordtii – ML 327 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Muehlenpfordtii/Mammillaria muehlenpfordtii – ML 652 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Muehlenpfordtii/Mammillaria muehlenpfordtii – ML 82 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Muehlenpfordtii/Mammillaria muehlenpfordtii – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Multidigitata/Mammillaria multidigitata – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Multidigitata/Mammillaria multidigitata – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Multidigitata/Mammillaria multidigitata – Photo Franck Martin – Collection du Jardin Exotique de Monaco.jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax (syn. M. casoi) – .jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax (syn. M. casoi) – ML 185 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax (syn. M. casoi) – ML 254 Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax (syn. M. erythra) – ML 271 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax (syn. M. huajuapensis) – .jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax (syn. M. huajuapensis) – ML 348 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax (syn. M. huajuapensis) – Photo Giuseppe Ruini.jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax (syn. M. huajuapensis) -Photo Bert Hahnraths.jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax – ML 274 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax – ML 56 – Photo Michel Lacoste.jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax – Photo Norman Dennis .jpg


Mammillaria Mystax/Mammillaria mystax SB 1081 – Photo Francesco Marzocca.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei (syn M. duwei) – Photo Luc.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei (syn M. duwei) – Photo et plante Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei (syn. M. duwei) (Origine Kuentz) – Photo Francois.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei (syn. M. duwei) – ML 331 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei (syn. M. duwei) – ML 331 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei (syn. M. duwei)- Photo Christophe Blanchy.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei – Photo Flo Santo 2.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei – Photo Flo Santo.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei – Photo Hugo De Cock 2.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei – Photo Paolo.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei – Photo Willy.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp duwei clump – 13 cm bulb pot – Photo Norman Dennis.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp nana (syn M. monancistracantha) – ML325 – SS575-98 – Photo Aymeric de Barmon.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp nana (syn M. trichacantha ) – Photo Hugo De Cock.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp nana (syn. M. monancistracantha) – ML 329 – Photo Michel Lacoste 1.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp nana (syn. M. monancistracantha) – ML 329 – Photo Michel Lacoste 2.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp nana (syn. M. monancistracantha) – ML 329 – Photo Michel Lacoste 3.jpg


Mammillaria Nana/Mammillaria nana ssp